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Artistic Reconfigurations of Rome

An Alternative Guide to the Eternal City, 1989-2014

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Kaspar Thormod

In Artistic Reconfigurations of Rome Kaspar Thormod examines how visions of Rome manifest themselves in artworks produced by international artists who have stayed at the city’s foreign academies. Structured as an alternative guide to Rome, the book represents an interdisciplinary approach to creating a dynamic visual history that brings into view facets of the city’s diverse contemporary character. Thormod demonstrates that when artists successfully reconfigure Rome they provide us with visions that, being anchored in a present, undermine the connotations of permanence and immovability that cling to the ‘Eternal City’ epithet. Looking at the work of these artists, the reader is invited to engage critically with the question: what is Rome today? – or perhaps better: what can Rome be?
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Applied Arts in British Exile from 1933

Changing Visual and Material Culture

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Edited by Marian Malet, Rachel Dickson, Sarah MacDougall and Anna Nyburg

Yearbook Volume 19 continues an investigation which began with Arts in Exile in Britain 1933-45 (Volume 6, 2004). Twelve chapters, ten in English and two in German, address and analyse the significant contribution of émigrés across the applied arts, embracing mainstream practices such as photography, architecture, advertising, graphics, printing, textiles and illustration, alongside less well known fields of animation, typography and puppetry. New research adds to narratives surrounding familiar émigré names such as Oskar Kokoschka and Wolf Suschitzky, while revealing previously hidden contributions from lesser known practitioners. Overall, the volume provides a valuable addition to the understanding of the applied arts in Britain from the 1930s onwards, particularly highlighting difficulties faced by refugees attempting to continue fractured careers in a new homeland.

Contributors are: Rachel Dickson, Burcu Dogramaci, Deirdre Fernand, Fran Lloyd, David Low, John March, Sarah MacDougall, Anna Nyburg, Pauline Paucker, Ines Schlenker, Wilfried Weinke, and Julia Winckler.
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Edited by Benedikt Hjartarson, Andrea Kollnitz, Per Stounbjerg and Tania Ørum

A Cultural History of the Avant-Garde in the Nordic Countries 1925-1950 is the first publication to deal with the avant-garde in the Nordic countries in this period. The essays cover a wide range of avant-garde manifestations: literature, visual arts, theatre, architecture and design, film, radio, body culture and magazines. It is the first major historical work to consider the Nordic avant-garde in a transnational perspective that includes all the arts and to discuss the role of the avant-garde not only within the aesthetic field but in a broader cultural and political context: the pre-war and wartime responses to international developments, the new cultural institutions, sexual politics, the impact of refugees and the new start after the war.
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Intertextualité surréaliste dans la poésie de René Char

Apparitions et réapparitions de l’image d’Artine

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Julie S. Kleiva

Dans Intertextualité surréaliste dans la poésie de René Char, Julie S. Kleiva montre comment la figure d’Artine, initialement une représentante du surréalisme charienne, se transforme en une image complexe, polymorphe et considérablement présente à travers l’œuvre de René Char (1907-1988). En adoptant une approche intertextuelle, Kleiva soutient que la figure d’Artine représente la force déroutante au cœur de l’imagination poétique charienne. L’image revenante d’Artine favorise l’idée d’une continuité dans l’œuvre poétique de Char malgré la rupture articulée au milieu des années 30.

In Intertextualité surréaliste dans la poésie de René Char, Julie S. Kleiva demonstrates how the initially surrealist figure of Artine becomes a complex, polymorphus and, most importantly, significally present image throughout the work of the French poet René Char (1907-1988). By adopting an intertextual approach, Kleiva argues that the figure of Artine is a disturbing and confusing creative agency that corresponds to the core of Char’s poetry. The reappearing image of Artine serves to demonstrate that Char’s poetic rupture of the years from 1935-1937 has been exaggerated, and must be viewed as a development rather than a clean break.
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Nathalie Kremer

En tant que spectateurs de peinture, Diderot et Baudelaire furent aussi toujours et d’abord créateurs. Ce livre montre comment leurs écrits ouvrent la voie à une approche moderne de l’art, où les œuvres sont recréées librement par l’imagination du spectateur.
Ce que nous appelons la « traversée » de la peinture consiste en une approche émotive de l’image, qui se montre sensible aux effets puissants des lignes et des couleurs, dans ce qu’elles incitent à penser ou à rêver. La critique d’art naît ainsi autant de l’adhésion empathique que du détachement du regard à l’œuvre contemplée.
Le lecteur découvrira ici alors la façon dont Diderot et Baudelaire ont traversé la peinture de leur temps pour donner à lire de nouvelles images, inépuisables, à rêver, méditer et savourer en tous temps.

Diderot and Baudelaire were viewers of paintings, but they were first and foremost artistic creators. This book shows how their writings open the way to a modern conception of art, where the works of art are freely recreated in the imagination of the viewer.
What we can call ‘traversing the painting’ consists of an emotional approach to the image, an approach which is sensitive to the powerful effects of line and colour, and the thoughts and dreams that they inspire. Art criticism thus springs as much from empathetic engagement with the artwork as it does from detachment from it.
The reader of this book will discover the way in which Diderot and Baudelaire traversed the painting of their times, proposed new, timeless and inexhaustible visions to meditate on and marvel at.
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Emblems in Scotland

Motifs and Meanings

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Michael Bath

Emblems in the visual arts use motifs which have meanings, and in Emblems in Scotland Michael Bath, leading authority on Renaissance emblem books, shows how such symbolic motifs address major historical issues of Anglo-Scottish relations, the Reformation of the Church and the Union of the Crowns. Emblems are enigmas, and successive chapters ask for instance: Why does a late-medieval rood-screen show a jester at the Crucifixion? Why did Elizabeth I send Mary Queen of Scots tapestries showing the power of women to build a feminist City of God? Why did a presbyterian minister of Stirling decorate his manse with hieroglyphics? And why in the twentieth-century did Ian Hamilton Finlay publish a collection of Heroic Emblems?
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Edited by Tuuli Lähdesmäki

Time and Transformation in Architecture, edited by Tuuli Lähdesmäki, approaches architecture and the built environment from an interdisciplinary point of view by emphasizing in its theoretical discussions and empirical analysis the dimensions of time, temporality, and transformation—and their relation to human experiences, behavior, and practices. The volume consists of seven chapters that explore the following questions: How do architectural ideas, ideals, and meanings emerge, develop, and transform? How is architecture manifested in relation to time, time-space, and the social dimensions it entails and produces? The volume provides both multifaceted theoretical discussions on time and temporality in architecture and empirical case studies around the globe in which these theories and conceptualizations are tested and explored.

Contributors are Eiman Ahmed Elwidaa, André van Graan, June Jordaan, Joongsub Kim, Tuuli Lähdesmäki, Assumpta Nnaggenda-Musana, Sanja Rodeš and Smaranda Spânu.
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Vincent Robert-Nicoud

In The World Upside Down in 16th Century French Literature and Visual Culture Vincent Robert-Nicoud offers an interdisciplinary account of the topos of the world upside down in early modern France. To call something ‘topsy-turvy’ in the sixteenth century is to label it as abnormal. The topos of the world upside down evokes a world in which everything is inside-out and out of bounds: fish live in trees, children rule over their parents, and rivers flow back to their source. The world upside down proves to be key in understanding how the social, political, and religious turmoil of sixteenth-century France was represented and conceptualised, and allows us to explore the dark side of the Renaissance by unpacking one of its most prevalent metaphors.
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Art and Science in Word and Image

Exploration and Discovery

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Edited by Keith Williams, Sophie Aymes, Jan Baetens and Chris Murray

Art and Science in Word and Image investigates the theme of ‘riddles of form’, exploring how discovery and innovation have functioned inter-dependently between art, literature and the sciences.

Using the impact of evolutionary biologist D’Arcy Thompson’s On Growth and Form on Modernist practices as springboard into the theme, contributors consider engagements with mysteries of natural form in painting, photography, fiction, etc., as well as theories about cosmic forces, and other fields of knowledge and enquiry. Hence the collection also deals with topics including cultural inscriptions of gardens and landscapes, deconstructions of received history through word and image artworks and texts, experiments in poetic materiality, graphic re-mediations of classic fiction, and textual transactions with animation and photography.

Contributors are: Dina Aleshina, Márcia Arbex, Donna T. Canada Smith, Calum Colvin, Francis Edeline, Philippe Enrico, Étienne Février, Madeline B. Gangnes, Eric T. Haskell, Christina Ionescu, Tim Isherwood, Matthew Jarron, Philippe Kaenel, Judy Kendall, Catherine Lanone, Kristen Nassif, Solange Ribeiro de Oliveira, Eric Robertson, Frances Robertson, Cathy Roche-Liger, David Skilton, Melanie Stengele, Barry Sullivan, Alice Tarbuck, Frederik Van Dam.

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The Plant Contract

Art’s Return to Vegetal Life

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Prudence Gibson

The Plant Contract argues that visual and performance art can help change our perception of the vegetal world, and can return us to nature and thought. Via an investigation into the wasteland, robotany, feminist plants, and nature rights, this phytology-love story investigates how contemporary art is mediating the effects of plant-blindness, caused by human disassociation from the natural world. It is also a gesture of respect for the genius of vegetal life, where new science proves plants can learn, communicate, remember, make decisions, and associate. Art is a litmus test for how climate change affects human perception. This book responds to that test by expressing plant-philosophy to a wider public, through an interrogation of plant-art.