Open Access

Attributing Excellence in Medicine

The History of the Nobel Prize

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Edited by Nils Hansson, Thorsten Halling and Heiner Fangerau

Attributing Excellence in Medicine discusses the aura around the prestigious Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine. It analyzes the social processes and contingent factors leading to recognition and reputation in science and medicine. This volume will help the reader to better understand the dynamics of the attribution of excellence throughout the 20th century.

Contributors are Massimiano Bucchi, Fabio De Sio, Jacalyn Duffin, Heiner Fangerau, Thorsten Halling, Nils Hansson, David S. Jones, Gustav Källstrand, Ulrich Koppitz, Pauline Mattsson, Katarina Nordqvist, Scott H. Podolsky, Thomas Schlich, and Sven Widmalm.
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Artistic Reconfigurations of Rome

An Alternative Guide to the Eternal City, 1989-2014

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Kaspar Thormod

In Artistic Reconfigurations of Rome Kaspar Thormod examines how visions of Rome manifest themselves in artworks produced by international artists who have stayed at the city’s foreign academies. Structured as an alternative guide to Rome, the book represents an interdisciplinary approach to creating a dynamic visual history that brings into view facets of the city’s diverse contemporary character. Thormod demonstrates that when artists successfully reconfigure Rome they provide us with visions that, being anchored in a present, undermine the connotations of permanence and immovability that cling to the ‘Eternal City’ epithet. Looking at the work of these artists, the reader is invited to engage critically with the question: what is Rome today? – or perhaps better: what can Rome be?
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« La chose de Waterloo »

Une bataille en littérature

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Edited by Damien Zanone

« La Chose de Waterloo » : l’expression inventée par Victor Hugo dit bien la difficulté qu’il y a à qualifier la bataille du 18 juin 1815. Qu’est-elle devenue au fur et à mesure de ses incessantes évocations depuis deux cents ans dans les textes les plus divers (livres d’histoire, Mémoires, roman, poésie, théâtre) ? L’ouvrage veut comprendre les ressorts de cette incantation prolongée qui, à force de narrer toujours les mêmes événements, en précise et en brouille tout à la fois le souvenir. La question est approchée à travers l’étude des représentations littéraires les plus célèbres de la bataille (Stendhal, Hugo), mais aussi de textes beaucoup plus rares.

Victor Hugo's expression « La Chose de Waterloo » emphasizes the two hundred year quandary of adequately describing the battle, held on June 18th 1815. What are the various ways in which a variety of texts (history books, memoirs, novels, poetry, plays) have tried to evoke this event? This book tries to understand the mechanisms of this phenomenon which, by telling the same events over and over, makes them more precise and less clear at the same time. The question is approached through the study of some of the most famous literary representations of the battle (Stendhal, Hugo), but also through less well-known texts.

Avec des contributions de/contributors:
Andrea Del Lungo, Philippe Dufour, Jean-Marc Hovasse, Jean-Marc Largeaud, Boris Lyon-Caen, Catherine Mariette, Claude Millet, Jacques Neefs, Michael Rosenfeld, Tiphaine Samoyault, Nathalie Saudo-Welby, Nicole Savy, Pierre Schoentjes, Catriona Seth, Alain Vaillant, Damien Zanone.
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Edited by Tomas Balkelis and Violeta Davoliūtė

Population Displacement in Lithuania in the XXth Century: Experiences, Identities and Legacies is an edited volume written by historians from several countries offering a series of ground-breaking case studies on forced migration in Lithuania during and between the two World Wars. Starting with the premise that the mass movement of peoples during and after the Second World War needs to be understood in relation to the population displacement of the First World War, the authors draw on theoretical perspectives ranging from entangled histories, cultural theory and studies of nationalism to trace the ethnic, social and cultural transformation of Lithuanian society caused by the displacement of Lithuanians, Poles, Jews and Germans.

Contributors are: Tomas Balkelis, Daiva Dapkutė, Violeta Davoliūtė, Andrea Griffante, Ruth Leiserowitz, Klaus Richter, Vasilijus Safronovas, Vitalija Stravinskienė, Arūnas Streikus and Theodore R. Weeks.
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Medical Practice, 1600-1900

Physicians and Their Patients

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Edited by Martin Dinges, Kay Peter Jankrift, Sabine Schlegelmilch and Michael Stolberg

Drawing in particular on physicians’ casebooks, Medical Practices, 1600-1900 studies the changing nature of ordinary medical practice in early modern Europe. Combining case studies on individual German, Austrian and Swiss practitioners with a comparative analysis across the centuries, it offers the first comprehensive and systematic overview of the major aspects of premodern practitioners daily work and business – from diagnostic and therapeutic approaches and the kinds of patients treated to financial issues, record keeping and their place in contemporary society.
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Arts and a Nation

The Role of Visual Arts and Artists in the Making of the Latvian Identity, 1905-1940

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Suzanne Pourchier-Plasseraud

Focusing on the role of arts in the construction of national identity, Suzanne Pourchier-Plasseraud has chosen to study the case of a country lacking an ancient state history of its own, Latvia. This book analyses the part played by the visual arts in transmuting the cultural concept of a nation, advocated by a small intelligentsia, into a widespread claim for independence. By the end of the 19th century, fretting under Russian political domination and German economic and cultural supremacy, the Latvians turned back to their own language, culture and folklore, with a special interest for their dainas, their timeless common heritage rooted into a mythical golden age. Latvian artists thus found themselves entrusted with the mission of creating a national iconographic representation and a specifically Latvian art, freed from Russian and German influences. The author shows how the links between the cultural and political spheres evolved between 1905 and 1940, including during the period of authoritarian government preceding WWII. An enlightening contribution to understanding how art and history can be turned into social and political instruments, this book reaches far beyond the Latvian case to a European and even global scope.

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Irena Veisaitė

Tolerance and involvement

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Yves Plasseraud

Irena Veisaitė is held in deep esteem throughout her country. This volume is an attempt to relate the difficult journey of her remarkable life against the backdrop of the complex history of Lithuania and its Litvaks (Lithuanian Jews).
After being rescued by Christian Lithuanian families and having survived the Holocaust Irena Veisaitė devoted herself to study and creative work. She was a memorable lecturer, respected theatre critic, associate film director, and also founder and chairman of the Open Society Fund (Soros Foundation) which made an invaluable contribution to the process of democratisation in Lithuania.
Irena Veisaitė made it her life’s work to speak up for dialogue and mutual understanding and believes that even in the most difficult circumstances it is possible to preserve one’s humanity. Having lived through some of the major atrocities of the twentieth century, her insistence on the need for tolerance has inspired many.
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Edited by Per Bäckström and Benedikt Hjartarson

Decentring the Avant-Garde presents a collection of articles dealing with the topography of the avant-garde. The focus is on different responses to avant-garde aesthetics in regions traditionally depicted as cultural, geographical and linguistic peripheries. Avant-garde activities in the periphery have to date mostly been described in terms of a passive reception of new artistic trends and currents originating in cultural centres such as Paris or Berlin. Contesting this traditional view, Decentring the Avant-Garde highlights the importance of analysing the avant-garde in the periphery in terms of an active appropriation of avant-garde aesthetics within different cultural, ideological and historical settings. A broad collection of case studies discusses the activities of movements and artists in various regions in Europe and beyond. The result is a new topographical model of the international avant-garde and its cultural practices.
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Edited by Philomena Essed and Isabel Hoving

Dutch Racism is the first comprehensive study of its kind. The approach is unique, not comparative but relational, in unraveling the legacy of racism in the Netherlands and the (former) colonies. Authors contribute to identifying the complex ways in which racism operates in and beyond the national borders, shaped by European and global influences, and intersecting with other systems of domination. Contrary to common sense beliefs it appears that old-fashioned biological notions of “race” never disappeared. At the same time the Netherlands echoes, if not leads, a wider European trend, where offensive statements about Muslims are an everyday phenomenon. Dutch Racism challenges readers to question what happens when the moral rejection of racism looses ground.
The volume captures the layered nature of Dutch racism through a plurality of registers, methods, and disciplinary approaches: from sociology and history to literary analysis, art history and psychoanalysis, all different elements competing for relevance, truth value, and explanatory power. This range of voices and visions offers illuminating insights in the two closely related questions that organize this book: what factors contribute to the complexity of Dutch racism? And why is the concept of racism so intensely contested? The volume will speak to audiences across the humanities and social sciences and can be used as textbook in undergraduate as well as graduate courses.
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European Encounters

Intellectual Exchange and the Rethinking of Europe 1914-1945

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Edited by Carlos Reijnen and Marleen Rensen

European Encounters explores the making and remaking of ideas of Europe between 1914 and 1945 as a result of intellectual encounters and intellectual exchange. Against the background of the first half of the twentieth century European intellectuals feverishly chased new and uncharted territories, most often across national borders. Their encounters with other intellectuals, or ideas, cultures, concepts and practices produced new understandings of Europe and triggered projects for Europe’s future. West-European writers turned to Russian literature, Catholic politicians from Northern Europe embraced corporatist and fascist solutions from Mediterranean Europe, scientists pointed at science and their network as sources of peace and reconciliation and others committed themselves to the European federalism of the Pan-Europa Movement. This volume unravels the encounters and exchanges that lie at the roots of this attempt at rethinking Europe.