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Edited by Marc Hersant and Catherine Ramond

Comme la destinataire des Mémoires du cardinal de Retz, l’époque classique « aime les portraits ». Ils abondent dans les jeux mondains, les récits historiques, les Mémoires, les lettres. Ils occupent également une place importante dans les fictions narratives de la période, et notamment dans les romans. L’ouvrage collectif Les Portraits dans les récits factuels et fictionnels de l’époque classique, édité par Marc Hersant et Catherine Ramond, propose une confrontation systématique de ces deux pratiques d’écriture, une analyse de leurs similitudes et de leurs différences. Sous un angle peu étudié jusqu’à présent, il couvre un large champ de l’écriture du portrait, à partir de nombreux exemples allant de Brantôme à Stendhal.

Like the recipient of the Cardinal de Retz’ Memoirs, the early modern period “loves portraits”. They can be found in social games, historical narratives, Memoirs, and letters. They also occupy an important place in narrative fiction of that period, especially in novels. The collective volume Les Portraits dans les récits factuels et fictionnels de l’époque classique, edited by Marc Hersant and Catherine Ramond, proposes a systematic confrontation of these two writing practices, and analyzes their similarities and differences. From a hitherto little studied angle, the book covers a wide range of examples of portrait writing, from Brantôme to Stendhal.
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Edited by Carme Font Paz and Nina Geerdink

Economic Imperatives for Women’s Writing in Early Modern Europe delves into the early modern history of women’s authorship and literary production in Europe taking a material turn. The case studies included in the volume represent women writers from various European countries and comparatively reflect the nuances of their participation in a burgeoning commercial market for authors while profiting as much from patronage. From self-representation as professional writers to literary reception, the challenges of reputation, financial hardships, and relationships with editors and colleagues, the essays in this collection show from different theoretical standpoints and linguistic areas that gender biases played a far less limiting role in women’s literary writing than is commonly assumed, while they determined the relationship between moneymaking, self-representation, and publishing strategies.
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Vincent Robert-Nicoud

In The World Upside Down in 16th Century French Literature and Visual Culture Vincent Robert-Nicoud offers an interdisciplinary account of the topos of the world upside down in early modern France. To call something ‘topsy-turvy’ in the sixteenth century is to label it as abnormal. The topos of the world upside down evokes a world in which everything is inside-out and out of bounds: fish live in trees, children rule over their parents, and rivers flow back to their source. The world upside down proves to be key in understanding how the social, political, and religious turmoil of sixteenth-century France was represented and conceptualised, and allows us to explore the dark side of the Renaissance by unpacking one of its most prevalent metaphors.
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Edited by Paul Pelckmans

Les Fables de La Fontaine multiplient les échos savamment aménagés. Le présent recueil voudrait souligner qu’elles aménagent aussi toute une intertextualité interne: les douze Livres regroupent des textes qui avaient déjà circulé séparément et dont la mise en série, même si elle ne débouche sur aucune structure globale du recueil, crée quelquefois des irisations assez paradoxales. Les études ici rassemblées cherchent à définir les critères qui permettent de reconnaître ces sériages, que La Fontaine souligne rarement pour laisser à la sagacité du lecteur le plaisir de les repérer. On voudrait montrer aussi que certaines fables très connues prennent, à la faveur de ces voisinages, une couleur fort inattendue.

La Fontaine’s Fables cultivate a sophisticated art of subtle echoes. They also set up occasionally a discreet internal intertextuality: the twelve Books of the definitive edition group texts that had already circulated separately and create somewhere brief series with very surprising iridescences. The author’s of the present essays search to define benchmarks that may allow to recognize this series: La Fontaine mostly preferred not to stress them explicitly, it should be the reader’s pleasure to locate them! The essays show also that some very well-known fables present, when read in combination with their neighbour-texts, a completely unexpected physiognomy.

Avec les contributions de / contributors: Julien Bardot, Patrick Dandrey, Marc Escola, Sjef Houppermans, Yves Lepestipon, Paul.J.Smith, Tiphaine Rolland
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Edited by Jorge Bastos da Silva and Miguel Ramalhete Gomes

This volume highlights the connections that link both literary discourse and the discourse about literature to the conceptual or representational frameworks, practices, and cognitive results (the ‘truths’) of disciplines such as psychology, medicine, epistemology, anthropology, cartography, chemistry, and rhetoric. Literature and the sciences, embedded as they are in specific historical circumstances, thus emerge as fields of inquiry and representation which share a number of assumptions and are determined or constructed by several modes of cross-fertilization. The range of authors examined includes Richard Brome, Margaret Cavendish, Aphra Behn, Shaftesbury, Defoe, Swift, Richardson and Smollett, while emphasis is placed on how authors of literature regard the practices, practitioners and findings of science, as well as on how ‘mimesis’ intersects with scientific discourse.

Contributors are Bernhard Klein, Daniel Essig García, George Rousseau, Jorge Bastos da Silva, Kate De Rycker, Maria Avxentevskaya, Miguel Ramalhete Gomes, Mihaela Irimia, Richard Nate, and Wojciech Nowicki.
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Deanna Smid

In The Imagination in Early Modern English Literature, Deanna Smid presents a literary, historical account of imagination in early modern English literature, paying special attention to its effects on the body, to its influence on women, to its restraint by reason, and to its ability to create novelty. An early modern definition of imagination emerges in the work of Robert Burton, Francis Bacon, Edward Reynolds, and Margaret Cavendish. Smid explores a variety of literary texts, from Thomas Nashe’s The Unfortunate Traveler to Francis Quarles’s Emblems, to demonstrate the literary consequences of the early modern imagination. The Imagination in Early Modern English Literature insists that, if we are to call an early modern text “imaginative,” we must recognize the unique characteristics of early modern English imagination, in all its complexity.
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Mademoiselle de Montpensier

Writings, Châteaux, and Female Self-Construction in Early Modern France

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Sophie Maríñez

Mademoiselle de Montpensier: Writings, Châteaux, and Female Self-Construction in Early Modern France examines questions of self-construction in the works of Anne-Marie-Louise d’Orléans, Duchesse de Montpensier (1627-1693), the wealthiest unmarried woman in Europe at the time, a pro-women advocate, author of memoirs, letters and novels, and the commissioner of four châteaux and other buildings throughout France, including Saint-Fargeau, Champigny-sur-Veude, Eu, and Choisy-le-roi. An NEH-funded project, this study explores the interplay between writing and the symbolic import of châteaux to examine Montpensier’s strategies to establish herself as a woman with autonomy and power in early modern France.
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Violence de l'interprétation (XVIe-XVIIe s).

Le texte devant l'inquisition

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Edited by Anne Duprat

This collection of essays aims to measure the minimum scope for interpretation, with reference to texts produced under absolute constraints: those governing the trials of the Spanish Inquisition, as well as trials for witchcraft and libertinage, in polemical writings during the French wars of religion, or in the words of common law convicts in Italy and England.
Written by ten specialists in Early Modern literature and edited by Anne Duprat, these studies examine the violence inflicted on certain texts via the act of interpretation, and the means of resistance used in response. The essays illustrate how the violence of interpretation can also create the conditions necessary for the text to take on meaning.

Cet essai collectif propose de mesurer l’espace minimal nécessaire au déploiement d’une interprétation, à partir de textes produits sous une contrainte absolue : celle des procès d’Inquisition espagnols, mais aussi des procès pour sorcellerie ou libertinage, dans l’écriture polémique des guerres de religion en France, ou dans la parole de condamnés de droit commun en Italie et en Angleterre.
Produites par dix spécialistes de littérature des XVIe et XVIIe siècle, ces études réunies par Anne Duprat interrogent la violence qu’exerce l’interprétation sur certains textes, et les modes de résistance qu’ils déploient face à elle. Elles permettent de comprendre comment cette violence, qui fait dire à un texte ce qu’elle veut, peut aussi construire les conditions de possibilité de son sens.
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Edited by Andrea Hammel and Anthony Grenville

Exile and Everyday Life focusses on the everyday life experience of refugees fleeing National Socialism in the 1930s and 1940s as well as the representation of this experience in literature and culture. The contributions in this volume show experiences of loss, strategies of adaptation and the creation of a new identity and life. It covers topics such as Exile in Shanghai, Ireland, the US and the UK, food in exile, the writers Gina Kaus, Vicki Baum and Jean Améry, refugees in the medical profession and the creative arts, and the Kindertransport to the UK.