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Edited by Adeline Patard, Rea Peltola and Emmanuelle Roussel

The volume proposes original semantic analyses on items marking grammatical aspect. The contributions deal with structurally divergent languages, setting to the fore some less studied forms coding aspect, revisiting or challenging certain conventionalized views on aspectual categories and shedding light on interactions between aspect and modality, another multifaceted semantic category. In doing so, the volume is intended to emphasize the diversity of aspectual systems and the fuzzy semantics of grammatical aspect and help the reader to make their own mind on a topic traditionally viewed as a subcategory of verbal aspect together with lexical aspect.

Contributors are Denis Apothéloz, Trang Phan and Nigel Duffield, Galia Hatav, Jens Fleischhauer and Ekaterina Gabrovska, Stephen M. Dickey, Adeline Patard, Laura Baranzini, Jaroslava Obrtelova.
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Rosa Maria Calcaterra

Richard Rorty’s “neo-pragmatism” launched a powerful challenge to entrenched philosophical certainties of modernity, articulating a powerful picture of normativity as a distinctive activity of human beings. This “contingentism,” with its emphasis on indeterminacy, ambiguity, uncertainty, and chance, depicts normativity as a practical human possibility rather than a metaphysical bottleneck which we must overcome at the cost of repudiating the concrete ways we grant epistemic and ethical meaning to our activities. The book is a critical survey of Rorty’s philosophy, in light of contemporary theoretical debates around language, truth, justification, and naturalism, as well as his own resourceful attempts to renew philosophy from within by using the conceptual tools and argumentative techniques of both analytic philosophy and pragmatism.
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Edited by Maciej Witek and Iwona Witczak-Plisiecka

Normativity and Variety of Speech Actions embraces papers focused on the performative dimension of language. While all texts in the volume recognize speech primarily as a type of action, the collection is indicative of the multifaceted nature of J.L. Austin’s original reflection, which invited many varied research programmes. The problems addressed in the volume are discussed with reference to data culled from natural conversation, mediated political discourse, law, and literary language, and include normativity, e.g. types of norms operative in speech acts, speaker’s intentions and commitments, speaker-addressee coordination, but also speech actions in discursive practice, in literal and non-literal language, performance of irony, presupposition, and meaningful significant silence.

Contributors are: Brian Ball, Cristina Corredor, Anita Fetzer, Milada Hirschová, Dennis Kurzon, Marcin Matczak, Marina Sbisà, Iwona Witczak-Plisiecka, Maciej Witek, and Mateusz Włodarczyk.
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How to Make Our Signs Clear

C. S. Peirce and Semiotics 

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Edited by Martin Švantner and Vít Gvoždiak

How to Make Our Signs Clear is the result of an international cooperation between European and Brazilian Peircean scholars (I. A. Ibri, E. Višňovský, C. Paolucci and others) and strives to dispel simplifications of Peirce´s semiotic as well as to collect various insights into it and into its consequences for philosophy, especially philosophy of language, pragmatism and epistemology. The central theme of this book is the notion of the sign as a specific triadic relational unit, treated from various perspectives and applied to various fields of philosophy: semeiotic knowledge grows up from the discussions, common interests and possible conflicts between the readers of Peirce´s works. This book does not offer a general overview of Peirce´s theory of signs, but rather various analyses of consequences of some capacities of his semiotic.
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The Sequential Imperative

General Cognitive Principles and the Structure of Behaviour

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William Edmondson

In The Sequential Imperative William Edmondson explains how deep study of linguistics – from phonetics to pragmatics – can be the basis for understanding the organization of behaviour in any organism with a brain. The work demonstrates that Cognitive Science needs to be anchored in a linguistic setting. Only then can Cognitive Scientists reach out to reconsider the nature of consciousness and to appreciate the functionality of all brains.

The core functionality of the brain – any brain, any species, any time – is delivery and management of the unavoidable bi-directional transformation between brain states and activity – the Sequential Imperative. Making it all work requires some general cognitive principles and close attention to detail. The book sets out the case in broad terms but also incorporates significant detail where necessary.
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Prelude to Baltic Linguistics

Earliest Theories about Baltic Languages (16th century)

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Pietro U. Dini

This book is a study of the relatively unknown field of Baltic linguistic historiography associated with the 16th century. This has been the saeculum mirabile of Baltic philology, not only on account of the first books having appeared during that period, but also due to the diverse linguistic ideas about the Baltic languages which were circulating during Renaissance Palaeocomparativism: the Slavic and the closely connected Illyrian theory, the Latin theory (with its variants: the semi-Latin, the neo-Latin, and the Wallachian), also the Quadripartite theory. Minor but significant linguistic ideas are also discussed here, for example the emergence of a Hebrew theory and the Greek theory about Old Prussian. The synoptic juxtaposition of the different ideas shows very well the state of knowledge in Europe about the languages which later would be called ‘Baltic’ and the modernity of those ideas within European Renaissance linguistic debate leading to the rise of comparative linguistic genealogy.
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The Proto-Germanic n-stems

A study in diachronic morphophonology

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Guus Kroonen

The n-stems are an intriguing part of Proto-Germanic morphology. Unlike any other noun class, the n-stems have roots that are characterized by systematic consonant and vowel alternations across the different Germanic dialects. This monograph represents a diachronic investigation of this root variation. It traces back the Germanic n-stems to their Indo-European origin, and clarifies their formal characteristics by an interaction of sound law and analogy. This book therefore is not just an attempt to account for the typology of the Germanic n-stems, but also a case study of the impact that sound change may have on the evolution of morphology and derivation.
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Les modalités en français

La validation des représentations

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Laurent Gosselin

Le langage permet de communiquer des représentations, mais toujours énoncées selon un mode de validation/invalidation particulier, comme nécessaires, possibles, probables, douteuses, souhaitables, regrettables, obligatoires, redoutées, etc. Ce sont là les modalités linguistiques (au sens large). Elles sont exprimées par des marqueurs grammaticaux, des constructions syntaxiques, par l’ensemble des lexèmes, qui sont porteurs de divers types d’évaluations ; ou elles sont inférées sur la base de connaissances encyclopédiques et/ou discursives.
Cet ouvrage présente une théorie générale des modalités, appliquée au français moderne, sous la forme d’un système de règles. Dans ce cadre, sont proposées des solutions nouvelles pour résoudre des problèmes classiques de philosophie du langage (sémantique de croire/savoir, opacité référentielle, etc.) et de grammaire française (valeur de la négation, de l’interrogation, emploi du subjonctif, etc.).
Quoique le point de vue soit proprement linguistique, les relations avec les domaines connexes (pragmatique, sémiotique, rhétorique, analyse des discours, philosophie du langage, logique …) sont systématiquement précisées, dans le but d’éclairer cette dimension essentielle du jugement que constitue la validation des représentations.
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Robin D. Rollinger

One of the most important students of Franz Brentano was Anton Marty, who made it his task to develop a philosophy of language on the basis of Brentano’s analysis of mind. It is most unfortunate that Marty does not receive the attention he deserves, primarily due to his detailed and distracting polemics. In the analysis presented here his philosophy of language and other aspects of his thought, such as his ontology (which ultimately diverges from Brentano’s), are examined first and foremost in their positive rather than critical character. The analysis is moreover supplemented by translations of four important works by Marty, including his entire work On the Origin of Language. These are in fact the first English translations of any substantial writings by him. The resulting picture that emerges from the analysis and translations is that Marty has much to say that proves to be of enduring interest for the philosophy of language on a range of topics, especially the meanings of statements, of emotive expressions, and of names as regards both their communicative and their ontological aspects. The volume will be of interest not only to philosophers and historians of philosophy, but also to historians of linguistics and psychology.
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Bells Chiming from the Past

Cultural and Linguistic Studies on Early English

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Edited by Isabel Moskowich-Spiegel and Begoña Crespo-García

To understand the characteristics of present-day English language and culture we must have some understanding of the earlier stages of language use. Bells Chiming from the Past investigates the early development of English and covers different aspects of English medieval studies, from traditional philological concerns, to the most recent perspectives of modern linguistics applied to early English texts. Most of the papers are based on empirical research in English Historical Linguistics, and will contribute substantially to our theoretical and descriptive understanding of English varieties, both written and spoken.
The book focuses on the relationship and interaction of language and culture during the Middle English period. Some of the articles are clearly linguistically-oriented, but most could be included under a wider philological perspective since they study both language and the cultural milieu in which linguistic events took place.
Bells Chiming from the Past is aimed at an international readership and makes a desirable addition to the field of Historical Linguistics, featuring as it does contributions from an array of well-known professionals from different academic and scientific institutions.