Browse results

No Access

Series:

Edited by Adeline Patard, Rea Peltola and Emmanuelle Roussel

The volume proposes original semantic analyses on items marking grammatical aspect. The contributions deal with structurally divergent languages, setting to the fore some less studied forms coding aspect, revisiting or challenging certain conventionalized views on aspectual categories and shedding light on interactions between aspect and modality, another multifaceted semantic category. In doing so, the volume is intended to emphasize the diversity of aspectual systems and the fuzzy semantics of grammatical aspect and help the reader to make their own mind on a topic traditionally viewed as a subcategory of verbal aspect together with lexical aspect.

Contributors are Denis Apothéloz, Trang Phan and Nigel Duffield, Galia Hatav, Jens Fleischhauer and Ekaterina Gabrovska, Stephen M. Dickey, Adeline Patard, Laura Baranzini, Jaroslava Obrtelova.
No Access

Meaningful Absence Across Arts and Media

The Significance of Missing Signifiers

Series:

Edited by Werner Wolf, Nassim Balestrini and Walter Bernhart

This volume focusses on a rarely discussed method of meaning production, namely via the absence, rather than presence, of signifiers. It does so from an interdisciplinary, transmedial perspective, which covers systematic, media-comparative and historical aspects, and reveals various forms and functions of missing signifiers across arts and media. The meaningful silences, blanks, lacunae, pauses, etc., treated by the ten contributors are taken from language and literature, film, comics, opera and instrumental music, architecture, and the visual arts. Contributors are: Nassim Balestrini, Walter Bernhart, Olga Fischer, Saskia Jaszoltowski, Henry Keazor, Peter Revers, Klaus Rieser, Daniel Stein, Anselm Wagner, Werner Wolf
No Access

Series:

Edited by Sebastian Hoffmann, Andrea Sand, Sabine Arndt-Lappe and Lisa Marie Dillmann

The contributions in this volume provide a kaleidoscope of state-of-the-art research in corpus linguistics on lexis and lexicogrammar. Central issues are the presentation of major corpus resources (both corpora and software tools), the findings (especially about frequency) which are simply not accessible without such resources, their theoretical implications relating to both lexical units and word meanings, and the practical – especially pedagogical – applications of corpus findings. This is complemented by a lexicographer’s view on the data structures implicit in the Oxford English Dictionary (OED). The volume, which has sprung from the 36th ICAME conference, held in at Trier University in May 2015, will be of relevance for theoretical and applied linguists interested in corpora, word usage, and the mental lexicon.
No Access

Series:

Edited by Jolanta Wawrzycka

In Reading Joycean Temporalities, Jolanta Wawrzycka gathered scholars who address James Joyce’s experimental treatment of narrative time in terms that go beyond the much-discussed monologue intérieur and stream of consciousness. Contributors examine Joyce’s attempts to render temporal simultaneity through inescapably spatial means of language, including his deployment of Lessing’s concepts of nacheinander and nebeneinander; analyse Joyce’s handling of modalities of time, (in)finitude and temporal disharmonies in time/sense; and tackle Joyce’s engagements with historical time, Homeric time, and with poetic “markers of time”. The essays re-contextualize modernist and postmodernist critical, theoretical, philosophical and narratological polemics on time/temporality, relativity, language, and memory, and offer insightful readings of Joyce’s “double-timing”, “writing of finitude”, “time without measure”, and psychological vs. mechanically measured time.

Contributors are: Valérie Bénéjam, Tim Conley, Erika Mihálycsa, Stephanie Nelson, Christine O’Neill, Cóilín Owens, Fritz Senn, Annalisa Volpone and Jolanta Wawrzycka.
No Access

Natural Language and Possible Minds

How Language Uncovers the Cognitive Landscape of Nature

Series:

Prakash Mondal

In Natural Language and Possible Minds: How Language Uncovers the Cognitive Landscape of Nature Prakash Mondal attempts to demonstrate that language can reveal the hidden logical texture of diverse types of mentality in non-humans, contrary to popular belief. The widely held assumption in mainstream cognitive science is that language being humanly unique introduces an anthropomorphic bias in investigations into the nature of other possible minds. This book turns this around by formulating a lattice of mental structures distilled from linguistic structures constituting the cognitive building blocks of an ensemble of biological entities/beings. This turns out to have surprising consequences for machine cognition as well. Challenging mainstream views, this book will appeal to cognitive scientists, philosophers of mind, linguists and also cognitive ethologists.
No Access

Series:

Edited by Carla Risseeuw and Marlein van Raalte

The concept of friendship is more easily valued than it is described: this volume brings together reflections on its meaning and practice in a variety of social and cultural settings in history and in the present time, focusing on Asia and the Western, Euro-American world.
The extension of the group in which friendship is recognized, and degrees of intimacy (whether or not involving an erotic dimension) and genuine appreciation may vary widely. Friendship may simply include kinship bonds—solidarity being one of its more general characteristics. In various contexts of travelling, migration, and a dearth of offspring, friendship may take over roles of kinship, also in terms of care.
No Access

Series:

Edited by Anna Brożek and Jacek Jadacki

Izydora Dąmbska (1904-1982) was a Polish philosopher; a student of Kazimierz Twardowski, and his last assistant. Her output consists of almost 300 publications. The main domains of her research were semiotics, epistemology and broadly understood methodology as well as axiology and history of philosophy. Dąmbska’s approach to philosophical problems reflected tendencies that were characteristic of the Lvov-Warsaw School. She applied high methodological standards but has never limited the domain of analyzed problems in advance.
The present volume includes twenty-eight translations of her representative papers. As one of her pupils rightly wrote: “Dąmbska’s works may help everyone [...] to think clearly. Her attitude of an unshaken philosopher may help anyone to hold oneself straight, and, if necessary, to get up after a fall”.
No Access

Tradition of the Lvov-Warsaw School

Ideas and Continuations

Series:

Edited by Anna Brożek, Alicja Chybińska, Jacek Jadacki and Jan Woleński

The volume aims to show the variety of research currents of the Lvov-Warsaw School and the ways in which these currents are developed today. The content of the book is divided into three parts. The first part provides an overview of the logico-semiotical achievements of the Lvov-Warsaw School. It also includes analyses of specific problems: categorial grammar, theory of truth, theory of reasoning and semiotic defects. The second part presents some metaphysical and ontological views of Twardowski, Kotarbiński, Ajdukiewicz, Bocheński and Lejewski. In the third part, specific features of psychological and sociological branches of the Lvov-Warsaw School are discussed.

Contributors include: Anna Brożek, Wojciech Buszkowski, Alicja Chybińska, Mariusz Grygianiec, Aleksandra Horecka, Stepan Ivanyk, Jacek Jadacki, Ryszard Kleszcz, Natalia Miklaszewska, Wioletta Miśkiewicz, Teresa Rzepa, Piotr Surma, Jan Woleński, and Marta Zaręba.
No Access

Series:

Edited by Emmanuelle Labeau and Qiaochao Zhang

This volume on TAME systems (Tense-aspect-mood-evidentiality) stems from the 10th Chronos conference that took place in Aston University (Birmingham, UK) on 18th-20th April 2011. The papers collated here are therefore a chosen selection from a stringent peer-review process. They also witness to the width and breadth of the interests pursued within the Chronos community. Besides the traditional Western European languages, this volume explores languages from Eastern Europe (Greek, Romanian, Russian) and much further afield such as Brazilian Portuguese, Korean or Mandarin Chinese. Little known languages from the Amazonian forest (Amondawa, Baure) or the Andes (Aymara) also come under scrutiny.

No Access

Innovation in Tradition

Tönnies Fonne’s Russian-German Phrasebook (Pskov, 1607)

Series:

Pepijn Hendriks

This study explores the history of the language of a manuscript known as Tönnies Fonne’s Russian-German phrasebook (Pskov, 1607). The phrasebook is not, as many scholars have assumed, the result of the efforts of a 19-year-old German merchant, who came to Russia to learn the language and who recorded the everyday vernacular in the town of Pskov from the mouths of his informants. Nor is it, as other claim, a mere compilation by him of existing material. Instead, the phrasebook must be regarded as the product of a copying, innovative, meticulous, German-speaking professional scribe who was acutely aware of regional, stylistic and other differences and nuances in the Russian language around him, and who wanted to deliver an up-to-date phrasebook firmly rooted in an established tradition. By careful textological analysis and by comparing the text with the earlier phrasebook of Thomas Schroue, this study lays bare the modus operandi of the scribe and shows how the scribe acted as an agent of change when a phrasebook was handed down from one generation to the other.