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Jane Austen Speaks Norwegian

The Challenges of Literary Translation

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Marie N. Sørbø

What can translations reveal about the global reception of any authorship? In Jane Austen Speaks Norwegian: The Challenges of Literary Translation, Marie Nedregotten Sørbø compares two novels and six translations of them. The discussion is entirely in English, as all Norwegian versions are back-translated. This study therefore lends itself to comparisons with other languages, and aims to fill its place as one component in a worldwide field of research; how Jane Austen is understood and transmitted. Moreover, this book presents a selection of pertinent issues for any translator, including abbreviation and elaboration, style and vocabulary, and censorship. Sørbø gives vivid examples of how literary translation happens, and how it serves to interpret and refashion literature for new readerships.
No Access

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Edited by Diana Brydon, Peter Forsgren and Gonlüg Fur

Brydon, Forsgren, and Fur’s Concurrent Imaginaries, Postcolonial Worlds demonstrates the value of reading for concurrences in situating discussions of archives, voices, and history in colonial and postcolonial contexts. Starting with the premise that our pluriversal world is constructed from concurrent imaginaries yet the role of concurrences has seldom been examined, the collection brings together case studies that confirm the productivity of reading, looking, and listening for concurrences across established boundaries of disciplinary or geopolitical engagement. Contributors working in art history, sociology, literary, and historical studies bring examples of Nordic colonialism together with analyses of colonial practices worldwide. The collection invites uptake of the study of concurrences within the humanities and in interdisciplinary fields such as postcolonial, cultural, and globalization studies.
No Access

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Douglas Robinson

Aleksis Kivi (1834-1872) is Finland’s greatest writer. His great 1870 novel The Brothers Seven has been translated 59 times into 34 languages. Is he world literature, or not? In Aleksis Kivi and/as World Literature Douglas Robinson uses this question as a wedge for exploring the nature and nurture of world literature, and the contributions made by translators to it.

Drawing on Deleuze and Guattari’s notion of major and minor literature, Robinson argues that translators have mainly “majoritized” Kivi—translated him respectfully—and so created images of literary tourism that ill suit recognition as world literature. Far better, he insists, is the impulse to minoritize—to find and celebrate the minor writer in Kivi, who “ sends the major language racing.”
No Access

Water in Social Imagination

from Technological Optimism to Contemporary Environmentalism

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Edited by Jane Costlow, Yrjö Haila and Arja Rosenholm

Water in Social Imagination considers how human communities have known, imagined and shaped water – and how water has shaped both material culture and the imagination. Essays from diverse perspectives offer histories of water at different scales – from community water wells and sacred springs to Siberian rivers and the regulated space of the Baltic Sea. From early modernization through Soviet style technological optimism to contemporary environmentalism, water’s ideological uses are multiple. With sustained attention not just to state policy and the technologies of high modernity, but to creative resistance to utilitarian imaginations, these essays insist on fluidities of meaning, ambiguities that derive both from water’s physical mutability and from its dual nature as life necessity and agent of destruction.
No Access

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Edited by Tania Ørum and Jesper Olsson

A Cultural History of the Avant-Garde in the Nordic Countries 1950-1975 is the first publication to deal with the postwar avant-garde in the Nordic countries. The essays cover a wide range of avant-garde manifestations in arts and culture: literature, the visual arts, architecture and design, film, radio, television and the performative arts.
It is the first major historical work to consider the Nordic avant-garde in a transnational perspective that includes all the arts and to discuss the role of the avant-garde not only within the aesthetic field but in a broader cultural and political context: The cultural politics, institutions and new cultural geographies after World War II, new technologies and media, performative strategies, interventions into everyday life and tensions between market and counterculture.
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Edited by Elke Huwiler, Elisabeth Meyer and Arend Quak

Der Band enthält 13 Studien zum Schauspiel des Mittelalters und der Frühen Neuzeit. Dabei werden einerseits theoretische Betrachtungen, etwa zum Unterschied zwischen Osterfeier und Osterspiel oder zur Bedeutung der Musik für die Spiele, vorgelegt. Andererseits wird auf spezifische Spiele eingegangen, wie etwa auf das Heidelberger Passionsspiel von 1514, das Lübener Osterspielfragment, das älteste schwedische Spiel 'De uno peccatore', das Theophilusspiel, das Berliner Weihnachtsspiel von 1589 und Sebastian Brants 'Tugent Spyl'. Aber auch die Rezeption der Komödien des Terenz, die Entwicklung des Fasnachtspiels, das Puppenspiel in den Bearbeitungen des Maugis d'Aigremont sowie der Inseldiskurs und dessen Einfluss etwa auf Shakespeares 'The Tempest' werden behandelt.

Die Beiträge stammen von Bernd Bastert, Bart Besamusca, Cornelia Herberichs, Johannes Janota, Cobie Kuné, Tanja Mattern, Volker Mertens, Christian Moser, Arend Quak, Werner Röcke, Eckehard Simon, Clara Strijbosch und Elke Ukena-Best.

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The Dream of the North

A Cultural History to 1920

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Peter Fjågesund

Northern Europe and North America have dominated the world stage for more than two centuries. Using a wide range of sources, this book provides the first coherent account from a multi-national perspective of the ideas and perceptions that, from the Renaissance onwards, fuelled the North’s rise to prominence, and enabled it to rival the traditional cultural and political hegemony of the South. This includes not only the fascinating conquest of the polar regions, but also the religious upheaval of the Reformation, the changing view of nature engendered by Romanticism, and, not least, the revival of ancient Nordic and Celtic culture. Finally, the book offers an indispensable historical background to current events in the Far North, where the past and the future meet in a complex web of dramatic environmental concerns, the exploitation of natural resources, and the strategies of politics and commerce.
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The Life and Thought of Lev Karsavin

"Strength made perfect in weakness…"

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Dominic Rubin

“At last, Russia has begun to speak in a truly original voice.” So said Anatoly Vaneev, a Soviet dissident who became Karsavin’s disciple in the Siberian gulag where the philosopher spent his last two years. The book traces the unusual trajectory of this inspiring voice: Karsavin started his career as Russia’s brightest historian of Catholic mysticism; however, his radical methods – which were far ahead of their time – shocked his conservative colleagues. The shock continued when Karsavin turned to philosophy, writing flamboyant and dense essays in a polyphonic style, which both Marxists and religious traditionalists found provocative. There was no let-up after he was expelled by Lenin from Soviet Russia: in exile, he became a leading theorist in the Eurasian political movement, combining Orthodox theology with a left-wing political orientation. Finally, Karsavin found stability when he was invited to teach history in Lithuania: there he spent twenty years reworking his philosophy, before suffering the German and Soviet invasions of his new homeland, and then deportation and death. Clearing away misunderstandings and putting the work and life in context, this book shows how Karsavin made an original contribution to European philosophy, inter-religious dialogue, Orthodox and Catholic theology, and the understanding of history.
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Edited by Wolfgang Behschnitt, Sarah De Mul and Liesbeth Minnaard

Literature, Language, and Multiculturalism in Scandinavia and the Low Countries presents a ground-breaking comparative approach to the study of multicultural literature. Focusing on the development of migration literature in Sweden, Denmark, Flanders, and the Netherlands, the volume argues that the political and institutional preconditions for the development of ‘multicultural’ literatures are still given within the frame of the nation-state. As a consequence, both the field of ‘migration literature’ and the (multi-)lingual quality of literary texts are shaped differently in each state and in each language area. The volume delineates the development of multicultural literature in Scandinavia and the Low Countries as a function of the specific language situations in these countries as well as the various political, institutional, and discursive contexts.
This book not only offers a comprehensive theoretical and methodological analysis of multilingualism and multicultural literature, but also provides overviews sketching the discourse on multiculturalism, language and the development of the literary field in Sweden, Denmark, the Netherlands, and Flanders. Besides it presents a broad range of in-depth analyses of selected literary texts from each of these countries.
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Baltic Eugenics

Bio-Politics, Race and Nation in Interwar Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania 1918-1940

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Edited by Björn M. Felder and Paul J. Weindling

The history of eugenics in the Baltic States is largely unknown. The book compares for the first time the eugenic projects of Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania and the related disciplines of racial anthropology and psychiatry, and situates them within the wider European context. Strong ethno-nationalism defined the nation as a biological group, which was fostered by authoritarian regimes established in Lithuania in 1926, and in Estonia and Latvia in 1934. The eugenics projects were designed to establish a nation in biological terms. Their aims were to render the nation ethnically, genetically and racially homogeneous. The main agenda was a non-democratic state that defined its population in biological terms. Eugenic policies were to regenerate the nation and to reconstruct it as a “pure” and “original” race, Such schemes for national regeneration contained strong elements of secular religion.