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Spaces of Longing and Belonging

Territoriality, Ideology and Creative Identity in Literature and Film

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Edited by Brigitte le Juez and Bill Richardson

Spaces of Longing and Belonging contains theoretical and interpretative studies of spatiality centered on a variety of literary and cultural contexts. It offers new and complementary insights into creative uses of spatiality in artistic texts and generally into the field of spatiality as a cultural phenomenon, especially, although not exclusively, in terms of literary space. Ranging over questions of aesthetics, politics, sociohistorical concerns, issues of postcoloniality, transculturality, ecology and features of interpersonal spaces, among others, the essays provide a considerable collection of innovative scholarship on crucial questions relating to literary spatiality generally, as well as detailed analyses of particular works and authors. The volume includes ground-breaking theoretical investigations of crucial dimensions of spatiality in a context of increased global awareness.
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Edited by Rallie Murray and Stefanie Schnitzer

Our world has become inundated with images of a reality in which ‘evil’ thrives, and ‘good’ seems to be a naïve, utopian fantasy. ‘Good’ is reserved for superheroes and children’s stories, while the ‘real world’ is driven by greed, violence, and hatred. If we are so consumed with evil, then is there any point to writing about it? Perhaps the more important question is ‘why should we ever stop writing about it?’. Towards that end, this volume is intended to act as a catalyst to an ongoing destabilization of mental (philosophical) and social (political, historical) regimes of ‘evil’ in thought and practice. It is compiled with the intention of saying something new about a very old topic, as a reminder that this is an unfinished conversation which stretches back millennia and has a deeply tangible impact on the worlds within which we live today. Contributors are Peter Brian Barry, Lima Bhuiyan, Diedra L. Clay, Zachary J. Goldberg, Sophia Kanaouti, Stefanie Schnitzer Mills, Rallie Murray, Asli Tekinay and Claudio Vescia Zanini.
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Edited by Tracy Ann Hayes, Theresa Edlmann and Laurinda Brown

This book is a collection of papers from an international inter-disciplinary conference focusing on storytelling and human life. The chapters in this volume provide unique accounts of how stories shape the narratives and discourses of people’s lives and work; and those of their families and broader social networks. From making sense of history; to documenting biographies and current pedagogical approaches; to exploring current and emerging spatial and media trends; this book explores the possibilities of narrative approaches as a theoretical scaffold across numerous disciplines and in diverse contexts. Central to all the chapters is the idea of stories being a creative and reflexive means to make sense of people’s past, current realities and future possibilities. Contributors are Prue Bramwell-Davis, Brendon Briggs, Laurinda Brown, Rachel Chung, Elizabeth Cummings, Szymon Czerkawski, Denise Dantas, Joanna Davidson, Nina Dvorko, Sarah Eagle, Theresa Edlmann, Gavin Fairbairn, Keven Fletcher, Sarah Garvey, Phyllis Hastings, Tracy Ann Hayes, Welby Ings, Stephanie Jacobs, Dean Jobb, Caroline M. Kisiel, Maria-Dolores Lozano, Mădălina Moraru, Michael R. Ogden, Nancy Peled, Valerie Perry, Melissa Lee Price, Rasa Račiūnaitė-Paužuolienė, Irena Ragaišienė, Sara Shafer, Remko Smid, Paulette Stevens, Cheryl Svensson, Mary O’Brien Tyrrell, Shunichi Ueno, Leona Ungerer, Sarah White, Wai-ling Wong and Bridget Anthonia Makwemoisa Yakubu.
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Pacifism, Politics, and Feminism

Intersections and Innovations

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Edited by Jennifer Kling

Pacifism, Politics, and Feminism: Intersections and Innovations discusses a) how feminist analyses allow for and encourage the re-conceptualization of concepts and ideas once thought familiar from traditional ethical and political philosophy, and b) traditional political topics and issues through pacifist and feminist lenses. The chapters that focus on the former explore the possibility of “queering” such concepts as autonomy, violence, resistance, peace, religion, and politics, while the chapters that focus on the latter bring feminist and pacifist sensibilities and arguments to bear on classic political questions such as when and how violence and war are justified, the appropriateness of various responses to climate change, and the correct way to engage with such topics and themes in educational, institutional settings. Contributors are David Boersema, Barrett Emerick, Tamara Fakhoury, Jane Hall Fitz-Gibbon, William C. Gay, Jennifer Kling, John Lawless, Megan Mitchell, and Harry van der Linden.
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Perspectives on Happiness

Concepts, Conditions and Consequences

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Edited by Søren Harnow Klausen, Bryon Martin, Mustafa Cihan Camci and Sarah Bushey

Happiness is a challenging, multifaceted topic, which obviously calls for an interdisciplinary approach. This work is a collection of papers which explore the phenomenon of happiness from a variety of angles, and from both theoretical and practical perspectives. They deal with the general nature and conditions of happiness, methods and measures for studying happiness, the consequences of happiness policies and discourses and the significance of specific factors, like landscapes or educational environments, for happiness. Some of the papers investigate the thoughts of ancient, 19th-century or 20th-century philosophers. Others employ theories and techniques from contemporary psychology to get a firmer grip on the elusive phenomenon of happiness. Contributors include Ranjeeta Basu, Valeriu Budeanu, Sarah Bushey, Mustafa Cihan Camci, Emily Corrigan-Kavanagh, Carolina Escobar-Tello, Julia Hotz, Søren Harnow Klausen, Kathy Pui Ying Lo, Andrea-Mariana Marian, Bryon Martin, Andrew Molas, Sean Moran, Liza Ortiz, Shelomi Panditharatne, Sheila M. Rucki, Jane Russel-O’Connor and Marie Thomas.
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Edited by Peter Bray

This book is a scholarly collection of interdisciplinary perspectives and practices that examine the positive potential of attending to the voices and stories of those who live and work with illness in real world settings. Its international contributors offer case studies and research projects illustrating how illness can disrupt, highlight and transform themes in personal narratives, forcing the creation of new biographies. As exercises in narrative development and autonomy, the evolving content and expression of illness stories are crucial to our understanding of the lived experience of those confronting life changes. The international contributors to this volume demonstrate the importance of hearing, understanding and effectively liberating voices impacted by illness and change. Contributors include Tineke Abma, Peter Bray, Verusca Calabria, Agnes Elling, Deborah Freedman, Alexandra Fidyk, Justyna Jajszczok, Naomi Krüger, Annie McGregor, Pam Morrison, Miranda Quinney, Yomna Saber, Elena Sharratt, Victorria Simpson-Gervin, Hans T. Sternudd, Mirjam Stuij, Anja Tramper, Alison Ward and Jane Youell.
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Patricia San José Rico

How do contemporary African American authors relate trauma, memory, and the recovery of the past with the processes of cultural and identity formation in African American communities?
Patricia San José analyses a variety of novels by authors like Toni Morrison, Gloria Naylor, and David Bradley and explores these works as valuable instruments for the disclosure, giving voice, and public recognition of African American collective and historical trauma.
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Erotic Subjects and Outlaws

Sketching the Borders of Sexual Citizenship

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Edited by Serena Petrella

This book examines the intricacies of emergent sexual citizenship. Designed for academics and broader audiences alike, the collection covers the theorization of sexual citizenship, the exploration of case studies in law, the relationship between sexual citizenship and bio-politics, and finally the erotic dissidence of sexual outlaws. The borders of sexual citizenship are traced, as authors investigate what it means to be ‘inside,’ as erotic subjects, or outside, as ‘sexual outlaws.’ The issues of inclusion and exclusion are approached through diverse methodological and analytical lenses: some articles are theoretical and philosophical, others are empirically based, presenting the findings of sociological and ethnographic research projects; some are textual analyses, of religious texts, film texts, and of legal discourse. Contributors are Abidemi Fasanmi, René Hirsch, Elene Lam, Jaclyn Lanthier, Todd G. Morrison, Nick J. Mulé, Elly-Jean Nielsen, Serena Petrella, Olivia Schuman and Deww Zhang.
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Testimony and Trauma

Engaging Common Ground

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Edited by Christina Santos, Adriana Spahr and Tracy Crowe Morey

This book offers a collection of reflective essays on current testimonial production by researchers and practitioners working in multifaceted fields such as art and film performance, public memorialization, scriptotherapy, and fictional and non-fictional testimony. The inter-disciplinary approach to the question of testimony offers a current account of testimony’s diversity in the twenty-first century as well as its relevance within the fields of art, storytelling, trauma, and activism. The range of topics engage with questions of genre and modes of representation, ethical and political concerns of testimony, and the flaws and limitations of testimonial production giving testament to some of the ethical concerns of our present age. Contributors are Alison Atkinson-Phillips, Olga Bezhanova, Melissa Burchard, Mateusz Chaberski, Candace Couse, Tracy Crowe Morey, Marwa Sayed Hanafy, Rachel Joy, Emma Kelly, Timothy Long, Elizabeth Matheson, Antonio Prado del Santo, Christine Ramsay, Cristina Santos and Adriana Spahr.
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Fashion and Contemporaneity

Realms of the Visible

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Edited by Laura Petican

This book represents the voices of scholars, fashion designers, bloggers and artists, who speak to the pervasive nature of fashion in matters of politics, history, economics, sociology, religion, culture, art and identity. Dialogically open, the volume offers a broad apprehension of visual matter in the global contemporary context with fashion at its core, exploring its metamorphosing, media-oriented and ‘disordered’ modes of being in the early twenty-first century. The book’s contributors consider topics of universal import stemming from the realm of fashion, its dissemination and impact, from institutional, corporate, collective and individual perspectives, reflecting on the morphing, interchanging and revolutionary quality of the visual realm as the basis for continued research in fashion studies. Contributors are Shari Tamar Akal, Jess Berry, Naomi Braithwaite, Claire Eldred, Sarah Heaton, Hilde Heim, Demetra Kolakis, Sarah Mole, Lynn S. Neal, Laura Petican, Cecilia Winterhalter, Manrutt Wongkaew.