Volume Editors: Seyfi Kenan and Selçuk Aksin Somel
Dimensions of Transformation is a memoriam dedicated to Metin Kunt who grappled with this issue during nearly half a century long of his academic life. It offers original articles on examples of structural changes throughout Ottoman history in administrative, cultural, religious, and economic realms. This volume includes eighteen original chapters written by a group of historians specializing in various aspects of transformation in the Ottoman Empire. The introductory chapter provides an in-depth analysis of social changes in history along with its conceptual, sociological and philosophical dimensions. A significant part of the articles of this volume focus on concrete examples of actors and agents who played various roles at different stages of political, social and cultural evolution and change from medieval age to modernity. Certain contributions reflect a multitude of aspects of transformative processes and thus provide the reader a broad perspective for understanding the complexities of historical transformations and transitions.

Contributors are Antonis Anastasopoulos, Iris Agmon, Tülay Artan, Karl K. Barbir, Fatih Bayram, Suraiya Faroqhi, Cornell H. Fleischer, Pál Fodor, Mehmet Kalpaklı, Cemil Koçak, B. Harun Küçük, Aslı Niyazioğlu, Mehmet Öz, Kaya Şahin, Derin Terzioğlu, Ekin Tuşalp-Atiyas, Christine Woodhead, N. Zeynep Yelçe, Elizabeth A. Zachariadou.
Apocalypticism, Messianism, and Utopianism through the Ages
In times of crises, be it about climate change, the pandemic corona virus, or democratic struggles, there is an unwaning interest worldwide in the end of times and related themes such as apocalypticism, messianism, and utopianism. This concerns scholarship and society alike, and is by no means limited to the religious field.
The present volume collates essays from specialists in the study of apocalyptic and eschatological subjects. With its interdisciplinary approach, it is designed to overcome the existing Euro-centrism and incorporate a broader perspective to the topic of end time expectations in the Christian Middle Ages as well as in East Asia and Africa.
Contributors include: Gaelle Bosseman, Wolfram Brandes, Matthias Gebauer, Jürgen Gebhardt, Vincent Goossaert, Klaus Herbers, Matthias Kaup, Bernardo Bertholin Kerr, Thomas Krümpel, Richard Landes, Zhao Lu, Rolf Scheuermann, and Julia Eva Wannenmacher.
In Monumental Sounds, Matthew G. Shoaf examines interactions between sight and hearing in spectacular church decoration in Italy between 1260-1320. In this "age of vision," authorities' concerns about whether and how worshipers listened to sacred speech spurred Giotto and other artists to reconfigure sacred stories to activate listening and ultimately bypass phenomenal experience for attitudes of inner receptivity. New naturalistic styles served that work, prompting viewers to give voice to depicted speech and guiding them toward spiritually-fruitful auditory discipline. This study reimagines narrative pictures as site-specific extensions of a cultural system that made listening to God's word a meaningful practice. Close reading of religious texts, poetry, and art historiography augments Shoaf's novel approach to pictorial naturalism and art's multisensorial dimensions.