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Volume Editor: C.X. George Wei
Considering the important impact of Asian cultures on international relations, we conducted a multifaceted analysis and authentic summary of the Asian experiences and patterns of dealing with foreign relations from an Asian insider’s perspective, aiming to find out where the diverging or converging diplomatic ways of the West and the East came from and what the positive diplomatic values and practices originated from Asian traditions are.
Focusing on China, volume one thoroughly analyses the nature, political culture and mechanism of the tribute system from ancient time to the modern era within and beyond China. Volume two studies the culture and diplomacy of various individual Asian nations except for China, both in general and in particular cases, with an interdisciplinary approach.

考慮到亞洲文化對國際關係之影響的特殊重要性, 我們從一個亞洲局内人的角度, 對亞洲處理對外關係的經歷和模式進行了多方面的分析和真實可信的總結, 以發現在哪裏東西方的外交方式出現了分歧或聚合, 以及什麽是源於亞洲傳統的具有積極意義之外交價值觀. 卷一集中于中國, 徹底分析了朝貢體系的本質, 政治文化及其從古至近代以及在中國境外的延申和演變.
卷二以跨學科的方式, 探討了除中國以外亞洲各國不同的文化和外交, 既有綜合分析, 也有個案研究.
Part I: The Pre-Islamic Period
Editor: Valerie Hansen
This is the first of two collections by top scholars working on the history of the Silk Road. This collection’s main focus is the first millennium CE when the Silk Road trade was at its height. Most of the entries are organized chronologically and geographically, concentrating on the sites (like Niya and Loulan) which flourished in the third and fourth centuries, then Turfan and Samarkand (500-800), and closes with the period after 800, when Tang China withdrew its troops from the region and the local peoples reverted to a largely barter economy. Coverage ends in 1000, when the first cities on the western edge of the Taklamakan converted to Islam. Introductory texts provide general overviews of the trade (including classic pre- and post-war studies), followed by a brief survey of the ancient trade routes. Of particular interest in this collection are the Silk Road’s most famous group of travellers, the Sogdians, a people from the region of Samarkand (in today's Uzbekistan) thanks to Chinese archaeologists who have recently uncovered several tombs that allow us to see how the Sogdians gradually adjusted to Chinese culture, decorating their tombs with detailed scenes of everyday life.
Networks of Malay-Indonesian and Middle Eastern 'Ulamā' in the Seventeenth and Eighteenth Centuries
Author: A. Azra
Author: Traude Gavin
Author: Ellen Raven
Volume two, containing circa 2000 records selected from the annotated bibliographic database on South and Southeast Asian art and archaeology (formerly Annual Bibliography of Indian Archaeology) found at www.abia.net. Compiled by an international team of specialists brought together in a project of The International Institute for Asian Studies (IIAS) in Leiden. Features all forms of scholarly publications, ranging from survey works to small but important articles in monographs and journals, published world wide between 1997 and 2001.
Subjects include pre- and protohistory, historical archaeology, ancient art history, modern art history, material culture, epigraphy and palaeography, numismatics and sigillography (seals). Covered are South Asia and its culturally related regions (Afghanistan, Uzbekistan, Tajikistan and Tibet) and Southeast Asia (including related regions in South China and the Pacific). The detailed bibliographic descriptions (which faithfully reproduce the original diacritics), controlled keywords and many elucidating annotations make this reference work into an indispensable guide to recent scholarly work on the prehistory and arts of South/Southeast Asia.
Exploring Political, Cultural and Commercial Interaction in the Indian Ocean World, 1200-1800
Volume Editors: Jos Gommans and Jacques Leider
Situated at the periphery of both South and Southeast Asia, the maritime frontier of Burma (Arakan, Lower Burma and Tenasserim) has long been neglected area of study. In spite of its location at the outskirts of powerful Asian polities such as Taungngu Burma, Ayutthaya and Mughal India, it served as an important cultural and commercial crossroads connecting all the regions surrounding the Bay of Bengal. For the first time in Burmese studies, this volume explores the interactive elements of Coastal Burma's civilization by bringing together a unique array of scholars, both historians and art historians, both anglophones and francophones, both South Asianists and Southeast Asianists. The result is a creative and colorful pastiche that pays tribute to Burma's distinctive political, cultural and commercial place in the Indian Ocean world.
True Democrat, Fighter for Humanity, 1909-1966
Author: Rosihan Anwar
Author: Gerrit Knaap
In the historiography of Southeast Asia of the early modern period maritime trade has always been an important topic. A good opportunity for learning more about early modern shipping and trade is by making use of the few surviving harbourmasters' registrations of private traffic in fifteen major ports in Java around the year 1775. In this book these records, registering more than 20,000 ship movements, are analysed and interpreted in their broader context. The traffic in the shallow waters along the coast of Java appears to have experienced a rising tide of Dutch presence.
Author: C.D. Grijns