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Public Diplomacy at Home

Domestic Dimensions

Series:

Ellen Huijgh

This book is about the domestic dimension of public diplomacy, which must be understood within the context of public diplomacy’s evolution over time. In the virtually connected world of today, newcomers such as supranational organizations, sub-states and Asian countries have had less difficulty than Western nation-states including a domestic dimension in public diplomacy. Doing so does not separate the domestic and international components; rather, it highlights that there is a holistic/integrative approach to public involvement at home and abroad. In Huijgh’s comprehensive analysis, including case studies from North America, Europa and the Asia-Pacific, public diplomacy’s international and domestic dimensions can be seen as stepping stones on a continuum of public participation that is central to international policymaking and conduct.

Whiggish International Law

Elihu Root, the Monroe Doctrine, and International Law in the Americas

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Christopher R. Rossi

International law’s turn to history in the Americas receives invigorated refreshment with Christopher Rossi’s adaptation of the insightful and inter-disciplinary teachings of the English School and Cambridge contextualists to problems of hemispheric methodology and historiography. Rossi sheds new light on abridgments of history and the propensity to construct and legitimize whiggish understandings of international law based on simplified tropes of liberal and postcolonial treatments of the Monroe Doctrine. Central to his story is the retelling of the Monroe Doctrine by its supreme early twentieth century interlocutor, Elihu Root and other like-minded internationalists. Rossi’s revival of whiggish international law cautions against the contemporary tendency to re-read history with both eyes cast on the ideological present as a justification for misperceived historical sequencing.

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Edited by Gilles Carbonnier, Humberto Campodónico and Sergio Tezanos Vázquez

This issue of International Development Policy looks at recent paradigmatic innovations and related development trajectories in Latin America, with a particular focus on the Andean region. It examines the diverse development narratives and experiences in countries such as Bolivia, Colombia, Ecuador and Peru during a period of high commodity prices associated with robust growth, poverty alleviation and inequality reduction. Highlighting propositions such as buen vivir, this thematic issue questions whether competing ideologies and discourses have translated into different outcomes, be it with regard to environmental sustainability, social progress, primary commodity dependence, or the rights of indigenous peoples. This collection of articles aims to enrich our understanding of recent development debates and processes in Latin America, and what the rest of the world can learn from them.

Ownership Paradigms in American Civil Law Jurisdictions

Manifestations of the Shifts in the Legislation of Louisiana, Chile, and Argentina (16th-20th Centuries)

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Agustín Parise

In Ownership Paradigms in American Civil Law Jurisdictions Agustín Parise assists in identifying the transformations experienced in the legislation dealing with ownership in the Americas, thereby showing that current understandings are not uncontested dogmas.
This book is the result of research undertaken on both sides of the Atlantic, and covers the 16th to 20th centuries. Agustín Parise offers readers a journey across time and space, by studying three American civil law jurisdictions in three successive time periods. His book first highlights the added value that comparative legal historical studies may bring to Europe and the Americas. It then addresses, in chronological order, the three ownership paradigms (i.e., Allocation, Liberal, and Social Function) that he claims have developed in the Americas.

The Protectors of Indians in the Royal Audience of Lima

History, Careers and Legal Culture, 1575-1775

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Mauricio Novoa

In The Protectors of Indians in the Royal Audience of Lima: History, Careers and Legal Culture, 1575-1775 Mauricio Novoa offers an account of the institution that developed in the vice-royalty of Peru for the protection of Indians before the high courts of justice. Making use of historical materials, Novoa provides a comprehensive view on the formation of the legal elite in Lima during the colonial period; reviews the litigation undertaken by indigenous plaintiffs, and explains the legal culture that allowed the development of juristic doctrine around the Indian personal status.

Europe and the Americas

Transatlantic Approaches to Human Rights

Edited by Erik André Andersen and Eva Maria Lassen

In Europe and the Americas: Transatlantic Approaches to Human Rights, leading scholars of different disciplines offer new insight into transatlantic approaches to human rights. At a time when global challenges (economic crises, poverty, terrorism, mass migration and climate change) have a profound impact on the universal development of human rights and democracy, a common transatlantic understanding of human rights may prove instrumental in meeting these challenges.

Through conceptual discussions, by analysing different human rights topics in different periods and regions (Europe, the United States and Latin America), and by focusing on a diverse range of actors, from policy makers and judicial institutions to academics and civil society, the authors identify key developments of human rights within a transatlantic framework.

The Chinese Cornerstone of Modern Banking

The Canton Guaranty System and the Origins of Bank Deposit Insurance 1780-1933

Series:

Frederic Delano Grant, Jr.

Modern bank insurance is traced to its roots in The Chinese Cornerstone of Modern Banking: The Canton Guaranty System and the Origins of Bank Deposit Insurance 1780-1933. Frederic Delano Grant, Jr. provides new understandings of the Canton System, collective responsibility for debt at Canton, and the history of deposit insurance.

The Canton Guaranty System inspired radical reform in New York in 1829 – the ancestor of all modern deposit insurance. Yet it was never the success imagined, and soon failed. In the Opium War, the Chinese government as implicit guarantor was forced to pay its debts in full on 23 July 1843. The afflictions of the Chinese system, including moral hazard, too big to fail, and unenforced laws, remain familiar today.