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Author: Mona Samadi
Mona Samadi examines the sources of gender differences within the Islamic legal tradition and describes how Islamic law entitles individuals to justice according to their status, abilities and potential. In the case of men and women's capabilities, the underlying principle is that they are entitled to the same rights, as long as their capabilities are the same. In the legal construction of women's status, women have been prescribed lacking the same abilities and capabilities as men. As such, their status and rights differ, justifying men to be the maintainers of women.

By presenting the historical development of women's status and how women's legal status is debated in contemporary Muslim societies, Mona Samadi convincingly provides various methods for facilitating change within the Islamic legal theory framework.
Author: Ilse Verdiesen
The deployment of Autonomous Weapons gives rise to ongoing debate in society and at the United Nations, in the context of the Convention on Certain Conventional Weapons. Yet there little empirical research has been done on this topic. This volume fills that gap by offering an empirical study based on military personnel and civilians working at the Dutch Ministry of Defence. It yields insight into how Autonomous Weapons are perceived by the military and general public; and which moral values are considered important in relation to their deployment. The research approach used is the Value-Sensitive Design (VSD) method that allows for the consideration of human values throughout the design process of technology. The outcome indicates that military personnel and civilians attribute more agency (the capacity to think and plan) to an Autonomous Weapon than to a Human Operated Drone. In addition, it is clear that common ground exists between military and societal groups in their perception of the values of human dignity and anxiety. These two values arise often in the discourse, and addressing them is essential when considering the ethics of the deployment of Autonomous Weapons. The text of this volume is also offered in parallel French and German translation.
Author: Alan Scott Rau
The ultimate question that runs through all of our law of arbitration is the allocation of responsibility between state courts and arbitral tribunals : If private tribunals assume the power to bind others in a definitive fashion, we must ask, where does this authority come from ? Fundamentally different in this respect from a state judge, a private arbitrator may only derive his legitimacy from that exercise of private ordering and self-government which characterizes any voluntary commercial transaction. This work begins then with the dimensions of that “consent” which alone can justify arbitral jurisdiction. The discussion is then carried forward to explore how party autonomy in the contracting process may be expanded, giving rise to the voluntary reallocation of authority between courts and arbitrators. It concludes with the necessary inquiry into the autonomy with respect to the “chosen law” that will govern the agreement to arbitrate itself.
Author: Nathalie Rébé
In Artificial Intelligence: Robot Law, Policy and Ethics, Dr. Nathalie Rébé discusses the legal and contemporary issues in relation to creating conscious robots, and argues that AI’s physical and decision-making capacities to act on its own, means having to grant it a juridical personality.

The advancement in new technologies forces us to reconsider the role Artificial Intelligence (AI) will have in our society. Sectors such as education, transportation, jobs, sex, business, the military, medical and security will be particularly affected by the development of AI.

This book provides an analysis of cases and existing regulatory tools, which could be used by lawyers in future trials. Dr. Rébé also offers a new comprehensive framework to regulate Strong AI so that ‘it’ can safely live among humans.

This book is a response to two questions: first, should we ban or prohibit AI; and, secondly, if not, what should be the salient features of a legal or regulatory framework for AI?
Authors: Seokwoo Lee and Hee Eun Lee
The Republic of Korea was colonialized in the early 20th century, achieved its independence, and rose from the ashes of the Korean War to become an Asian power. Korea’s ascent coincides neatly with the advent of globalization and growing importance of international law in managing the increasing interactions between states and other non-state entities such as multinational corporations, non-governmental organizations, and international organizations like the United Nations.

The Making of International Law in Korea addresses the developments of international law in Korea from human rights concerns to law of the sea issues; from maritime delimitation and access to ocean resources to other non-security matters. Offered as a textbook for academics and students, the authors demonstrate the increasingly important role of international law in shaping international relations in Northeast Asia and Korea.
The Asian Yearbook of International Law is the first publication primarily dedicated to international law as seen from an Asian perspective. It provides a forum for the publication of articles in the field of international law written by experts from the region, and also other articles relating to Asian topics. Its aim is twofold: to promote the dissemination of knowledge of international law in Asia and to provide an insight into Asian views and practices, which will be especially useful to a non-Asian readership.
As a rule, each volume of the Asian Yearbook will contain Articles, Notes, State Practice, a Chronicle of Events and Incidents, United Nations Activities with Special Relevance to Asia, a Survey of Activities of the Asian-African Legal Consultative Committee, a Bibliography and a Documents section.
The Asian Yearbook of International Law is a major refereed publication dedicated to international law issues as seen primarily from an Asian perspective. This is a special publication of its kind edited by a team of leading international law scholars from across Asia. The Asian Yearbook of International Law provides a forum for the publication of articles in the field of international law, and other Asian international law topics, written by experts from the region and elsewhere. Its aim is twofold: to promote international law in Asia, and to provide an intellectual platform for the discussion and dissemination of Asian views and practices on contemporary international legal issues.
As a rule, each volume of the Asian Yearbook normally contains articles; notes; a section on State practice; an overview of the participation of Asian countries in multilateral treaties; a chronicle of events and incidents; surveys of the activities of international organizations which have special relevance to Asia, such as a survey of the activities of the Asian-African Legal Consultative Committee; and book review, bibliography and documents sections.
The Asian Yearbook of International Law is a major refereed publication dedicated to international law issues as seen primarily from an Asian perspective. This is a special publication of its kind edited by a team of leading international law scholars from across Asia. The Asian Yearbook of International Law provides a forum for the publication of articles in the field of international law, and other Asian international law topics, written by experts from the region and elsewhere. Its aim is twofold: to promote international law in Asia, and to provide an intellectual platform for the discussion and dissemination of Asian views and practices on contemporary international legal issues.
As a rule, each volume of the Asian Yearbook normally contains articles; notes; a section on State practice; an overview of the participation of Asian countries in multilateral treaties; a chronicle of events and incidents; surveys of the activities of international organizations which have special relevance to Asia, such as a survey of the activities of the Asian-African Legal Consultative Committee; and book review, bibliography and documents sections.
The Asian Yearbook of International Law is a major refereed publication dedicated to international law issues as seen primarily from an Asian perspective. This is the first publication of its kind edited by a team of leading international law scholars from across Asia. The Asian Yearbook of International Law provides a forum for the publication of articles in the field of international law, and other Asian international law topics, written by experts from the region and elsewhere. Its aim is twofold: to promote international law in Asia, and to provide an intellectual platform for the discussion and dissemination of Asian views and practices on contemporary international legal issues.
As a rule, each volume of the Asian Yearbook normally contains articles; notes; a section on State practice; an overview of the participation of Asian countries in multilateral treaties; a chronicle of events and incidents; surveys of the activities of international organizations which have special relevance to Asia, such as a survey of the activities of the Asian-African Legal Consultative Committee; and book review, bibliography and documents sections.