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This volume is about the morphosyntactic encoding of feelings and emotions in Latin. It offers a corpus-based investigation of the Latin data, benefiting from insights of the functional and typological approach to language. Chiara Fedriani describes a patterned variation in Latin Experiential constructions, also revisiting the so-called impersonal constructions, and shows how and why such a variation is at the root of diachronic change. The data discussed in this book also show that Latin constitutes an interesting stage within a broader diachronic development, since it retains some ancient Indo-European features that gradually disappeared and went lost in the Romance languages.
In Methods in Latin Computational Linguistics, Barbara McGillivray presents some of the most significant methodological foundations of the emerging field of Latin Computational Linguistics. The reader will find an overview of the computational resources and tools available for Latin and three corpus case studies covering morpho-syntactic and lexical-semantic aspects of Latin verb valency, as well as quantitative diachronic explorations of the argument realization of Latin prefixed verbs. The computational models and the multivariate data analysis techniques employed are explained with a detailed but accessible language. Barbara McGillivray convincingly shows the challenges and opportunities of combining computational methods and historical language data, and contributes to driving the technological change that is affecting Historical Linguistics and the Humanities.
A Critical Edition of the Poem and its Latin Glosses
Les Eschéz d’Amours may be the last great medieval allegory to find its way into a modern edition. In the tradition of the Roman de la Rose, the Eschéz surveys matters of love, politics, economics, music, medicine, and chess through the lens of classical and Scholastic learning. In addition to the first 16,293 (of over 30,000) verses newly edited out of the manuscripts, the editors present a complete apparatus of literary, historical and linguistic essays that place the poem in the context of the scholarly and courtly life of late 14th century Paris. The important Latin glosses of the Venice manuscript of the Eschéz follow in an edition of their own, with critical notes and translation.
The Evolution of Early Greek Epic Diction in the Light of Oral Theory
For over 2500 years many of the most learned scholars of the Greek language have concerned themselves with the topic of etymology. The most productive source of difficult, even inexplicable, words was Homer’s 28,000 verses of epic poetry. Steve Reece proposes an approach to elucidating the meanings of some of these difficult words that finds its inspiration primarily in Milman Parry’s oral-formulaic theory. He proposes that during the long period of oral transmission acoustic uncertainties, especially regarding word boundaries, were continually occurring: a bard uttered one collocation of words, but his audience thought it heard another. The consequent resegmentation of words and phrases is the probable cause of some of the etymologically inexplicable words in our Homeric texts.