Browse results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 39 items for :

  • Biblical Studies x
  • Upcoming Publications x
  • Just Published x
  • Nach Ebene eingrenzen: All x
Clear All
Multidisciplinary Studies in Honour of Theo Maarten van Lint
From pilgrimage sites in the far west of Europe to the Persian court; from mystic visions to a gruesome contemporary “dance”; from a mundane poem on wine to staggering religious art: thus far in space and time extends the world of the Armenians.
A glimpse of the vast and still largely unexplored threads that connect it to the wider world is offered by the papers assembled here in homage to one of the most versatile contemporary armenologists, Theo Maarten van Lint.
This collection offers original insights through a multifaceted lens, showing how much Armenology can offer to Art History, History, Linguistics, Philology, Literature, and Religious Studies. Scholars will find new inspirations and connections, while the general reader will open a window to a world that is just as wide as it is often unseen.
Author:
The story of Tobit builds on various themes derived from myth, legend and folktale. Tobiah’s journey recalls Homer’s Odyssey, the suffering of the righteous brings to mind the legend of Job, and the narrative around a disgraced and then rehabilitated official evokes the story of Ahiqar. The author of Tobit seeks to exploit his readers’ knowledge of these stories in order to convey his message more effectively: he encourages them to trust in divine providence that intervenes on behalf of the faithful.
This volume, based on essays previously published in Italian, charts Tobit’s narrative sources through comparative literary analysis, firmly placing the story in the genre of the didactic and edifying religious novel.
Proceedings of the Fifteenth International Symposium of the Orion Center for the Study of the Dead Sea Scrolls and Associated Literature, Cosponsored by the University of Vienna Institute for Jewish Studies and the Schechter Institute of Jewish Studies
Biblical manuscripts from the Dead Sea and the Cairo Genizah have added immeasurably to our knowledge of the textual history of the Hebrew Bible. The papers collected in this volume compare the evidence of the biblical DSS with manuscripts from the Vienna Papyrus Collection, connected with the Cairo Genizah, as well as late ancient evidence from diverse contexts.
The resulting picture is one of a dialectic between textual plurality and fixity: the eventual dominance of the consonantal Masoretic Text over the textual plurality of the Second Temple period, and the secondary diversification of that standardized text through scribal activity.
Author:
This volume re-introduces Paul into the study of midrash. Though Paul writes and interprets scripture in Greek and the Tannaim in Hebrew, and despite grave methodological difficulties in claiming direct and substantial cultural contact between these literary traditions, this book argues that Paul is a crucial source for the study of rabbinic midrash and vice versa. Fisch offers fresh perspectives on reading practices that Paul and the Tannaim uniquely share; on Paul’s concept of nomos, and its implications on the reconstructed history of the Tannaitic twofold-Torah, Oral and Written; on the relationship between allegory and midrash as hermeneutical systems; and on competing conceptualizations of ideal readers.
The digital world pervades the everyday lives of most people, and online tools have become an essential part of academic research in many disciplines. This reality is true also for biblical studies and related disciplines, areas that work with complex literary traditions, multiple manuscript cultures, and many methodological approaches to the problems at the centre of our discussions. This book shines a light on multiple new and emerging approaches to big disciplinary questions in biblical studies and beyond by highlight projects that are using digital tools, crafting computer-assisted approaches, and re-thinking the resources fundamental to the history of research.
Sources de la transmission manuscrite en Islam : livres, écrits, images is a Festschrift offered to Marie-Geneviève Guesdon, curator of Arabic manuscripts at the BNF, codicologist and specialist in Arabic manuscript books, on the occasion of her retirement.
It brings together fourteen original contributions for which the collections of the BNF provided an essential source. Handwritten transmission in Islam over the long period is the central axis of the volume. New hypotheses are emerging, both on questions of transmission by shaykhs or scribe-painters and the circulation of ideas, texts and knowledge, as well as on the status and attribution of writings, the making of books, and the history of libraries.

Sources de la transmission manuscrite en Islam : livres, écrits, images sont des mélanges offerts à Marie-Geneviève Guesdon, conservatrice des manuscrits arabes à la BNF, codicologue et spécialiste du livre manuscrit arabe, à l’occasion de son départ à la retraite. Il réunit quatorze contributions originales dont les collections de la BnF forment une source essentielle. La transmission écrite en Islam sur la longue période est l’axe central du volume. De nouvelles hypothèses emergent, aussi bien sur les questions de transmission par les shaykhs ou les scribes-peintres, de circulation des idées, des textes et des savoirs que de statut et d’attribution des écrits, de fabrication du livre et d’histoire des bibliothèques.

Avec: Annie Berthier, Zouhour Chaabane, Khalid Chakor-Alami, François Déroche, Alain J. Desreumaux, Anne-Marie Eddé, Abdelouahad Jahdani, Khaled Kchir, Françoise Micheau, Anne Regourd, Francis Richard, Muriel Roiland, Jacqueline Sublet, Tal Tamari, Saadou Traoré, Annie Vernay-Nouri Annie Berthier, Zouhour Chaabane, Khalid Chakor-Alami, François Déroche, Alain J. Desreumaux, Anne-Marie Eddé, Abdelouahad Jahdani, Khaled Kchir, Françoise Micheau, Anne Regourd, Francis Richard, Muriel Roiland, Jacqueline Sublet, Tal Tamari, Saadou Traoré, Annie Vernay-Nouri
Streams of Tradition in Mark, Matthew, and Luke
This Synoptikon brings together the Synoptic Gospels, freshly translated, comparing them with materials selected from previous volumes in this series. The aim is to serve commentators who engage the Gospels critically and with the awareness that a consideration of their Judaic environments is crucial. Placing the texts within that setting evokes particular streams of tradition that interacted so as to produce the Gospels. These are set out in distinctive typefaces, so that readers may assess the depth of the Synoptic tradition as well as the breadth of its development.
In a seminal study, Cur cantatur?, Anders Ekenberg examined Carolingian sources for explanations of why the liturgy was sung, rather than spoken. This multidisciplinary volume takes up Ekenberg’s question anew, investigating the interplay of New Testament writings, sacred spaces, biblical interpretation, and reception history of liturgical practices and traditions. Analyses of Greek, Latin, Coptic, Arabic, and Gǝʿǝz sources, as well as of archaeological and epigraphic evidence, illuminate an array of topics, including recent trends in liturgical studies; manuscript variants and liturgical praxis; Ignatius of Antioch’s choral metaphor; baptism in ancient Christian apocrypha; and the significance of late ancient altar veils.
A Textual Reconstruction of Chapters 1–7
The first half of the book of Daniel contains world-famous stories like the Writing on the Wall. These stories have mostly been transmitted in Aramaic, not Hebrew, as has the influential apocalypse of Daniel 7. This Aramaic corpus shows clear signs of multiple authorship. Which different textual layers can we tease apart, and what do they tell us about the changing function of the Danielic material during the Second Temple Period? This monograph compares the Masoretic Text of Daniel to ancient manuscripts and translations preserving textual variants. By highlighting tensions in the reconstructed archetype underlying all these texts, it then probes the tales’ prehistory even further, showing how Daniel underwent many transformations to yield the book we know today.