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Santayana’s political ideas, as contained in Dominations and Powers and dispersed throughout his other works, have not been given the attention they deserve. This is the first comprehensive study of Santayana’s political hermeneutics as embedded in his general philosophy and intimately connected to his cultural criticism. Managing necessity and harmonizing diversity, negative anthropology, an Apollonian individualism and naturalistic humanism, are only a few of the interpretative categories used to elucidate the dense, ambiguous and ironic ruminations of Santayana and reveal their timeliness. Discussion of other thinkers—from Plato to Ricoeur—brings to light the essentially dialogical character of his work.
Editors / Translators: James Colbert and Oliva Blanchette
Gaston Fessard, S.J. (1897-1978), was a major mid-twentieth century French intellectual. He was a Hegel expert, but also wrote on issues of the day ranging from the Vichy regime to Christian-Marxist dialogue. The product of several decades of reflection, Fessard’s work on the Dialectic of the Spiritual Exercises of St. Ignatius of Loyola is the only one of its kind, a careful and penetrating study into the structure and tension of life-changing choices that Ignatius had in mind in his four week spiritual exercises. The Exercises insist on the way of making a spiritual Election, or choice in keeping with God’s will for oneself and for the Christian community at a particular moment in one’s existence.
Mill’s Principle of Utility: Origins, Proof, and Implications is a defense of John Stuart Mill’s utilitarianism with a particular emphasis on his proof of the principle of utility. Supplemented by a comprehensive historical background as well as salient philosophical assumptions and implications, its primary contribution is an analysis, interpretation, and defense of the controversial proof, which has yet to attract a scholarly consensus on how it works and whether it succeeds. The overarching aim of the book is the vindication of Mill’s reasoning in the proof and the restoration of his reputation as one of the clearest thinkers of his time.
The Anthology of the Works of Ugo Spirito captures the trajectory of Ugo Spirito’s complex body of thought that spanned more than fifty years, from 1921 to 1977. While confronting difficult contemporary problems related to philosophy and science, liberalism and socialism, fascism and communism, and other economic and ideological aspects such as corporativism and democracy, Spirito revealed a persistent desire to reach truth and the absolute. Yet, he also voiced his failure to remain faithful to any philosophical or political system considered definitive and unquestionable. Unable to reach incontrovertibility, he consistently dissected the prevailing contemporary ideas and systems, including his own beliefs, developing at the same time the ‘antinomic’ approach, a method of critical analysis that undermined any truth reputed irrefutable. Today, Spirito stands as one of most anti-conformist Italian thinkers for he challenged the certainties of modern thought.
Karel Kosík (1926–2003) was one of the most remarkable Czech Marxist philosophers of the twentieth century. His reputation as a creative thinker is owed largely to his philosophical ‘blockbuster’ Dialectics of the Concrete, first published in Czechoslovakia in 1963. In reintroducing Kosík’s philosophy to English-speaking readers, we show that Kosík’s work is important not only as a leading intellectual document of the Prague Spring, but also as an original theoretical contribution with international impact that sheds light on the meaning of labour and praxis, cognition and economic structure, and revolution and the crises of modernity.

Contributors include: Ian Angus, Siyaves Azeri, Vít Bartoš, Jan Černý, Joseph Grim Feinberg, Diana Fuentes, Gabriella Fusi, Tomáš Hermann, Tomáš Hříbek, Xiaohan Huang, Peter Hudis, Petr Kužel, Ivan Landa, Michael Löwy, Jan Mervart, Anselm K. Min, Tom Rockmore, Francesco Tava, and Xinruo Zhang.
This book highlights the legacy of the Lvov-Warsaw School in broadly understood contemporary philosophy of language. Fundamental methodological issues, important topics in syntax, semantics and pragmatics (such as modern Categorial Grammar, theories of truth, game-theoretical semantics, and argumentation theory) are tracked down to their origins in the Lvov-Warsaw School, and – the other way round – modern renderings of the ideas expressed by Kazimierz Ajdukiewicz, Tadeusz Kotarbiński, Stanisław Leśniewski, Jan Łukasiewicz, Alfred Tarski, Kazimierz Twardowski, and other members of the School are presented. Among contributors there are philosophers, logicians, formal linguists and other specialists from France, Italy, Poland, and Spain.
Perspektiven der Philosophie. Neues Jahrbuch eröffnet Forschern, denen die philosophische Begründung des Denkens wichtig ist, eine Publikationsmöglichkeit. Wir verstehen uns nicht als Schulorgan einer philosophischen Lehrmeinung, sondern sehen unsere Aufgabe darin, an der Intensivierung des wissenschaftlichen Philosophierens mitzuwirken. Besonders fördern wir den wissenschaftlichen Nachwuchs und laden ihn zur Mitarbeit ein.

Mit Beiträgen von: Michael Boch, Klaus Düsing, Dagmar Fenner, Christian Fernandes, Dimitri Ginev, Rolf Kühn, Thorsten Lerchner, Stefan Nürnberg, Rudi Ott, Nora Schleich, Harald Seubert, Anja Solbach, Andreas Thomas und Giovanni Tidona.
Through a discussion with current perspectives in philosophy of history – especially with a critical approach to Paul Ricœur’s work – and a rigorous reading of Karl Marx’s oeuvre, Karl Marx, Historian of Social Times and Spaces proposes an interpretation of Marx's concept and method of historical knowledge. In this sense the examination of Marx's concepts of social space and social time serve to highlight the possibilities of his work in terms of the explanation of the dynamics of complex multilinear development of human societies and of capitalism in particular.
Translator: Nathaniel Thomas
The German-Austrian social theorist and philosopher Leo Kofler (1907–1995) represents what Oskar Negt once called ‘unmutilated, living Marxism’. Throughout his life he dealt with issues of history and modernity, Marxist philosophy and the critique of ideology, philosophical anthropology and aesthetics. In this volume, author and Kofler biographer Christoph Jünke elucidates the contours of his philosophy of praxis, traces an arc from the socialist classics to postmodernism, and outlines the socialist humanist thinker’s enduring relevance. The book also includes six essays by Leo Kofler published in English for the first time.

The main work was first published in German as Leo Koflers Philosophie der Praxis: Eine Einführung in sein Denken by Laika Verlag, 2015, ISBN 978-944233-33-8. Copyright by Laika Verlag.
Author: Uno Kōzō
Editor / Translator: Ken C. Kawashima
Kōzō Uno’s Theory of Crisis presents an unparalleled and systematic demonstration of the inevitability of crisis under the capitalist mode of production. Based on a radical re-interpretation of Marx’s Capital, Uno’s theory of crisis emphasizes ‘excess capital alongside surplus populations’ and ‘the commodification of labour power’ at the heart of Marx’s theory of crisis, and additionally provides a concise overview of capitalist crises from the stage of mercantilism to the imperialist stage of capitalism.
Included are two Appendix essays by Uno, which disentangle theoretical difficulties related to the theory of crisis in Marx’s Capital, and two original and contemporary essays by Professors Makoto Itoh and by Ken Kawashima and Gavin Walker.
This book was originally published in Japanese as Kyōkō-ron by Iwanami Shoten, 1953.