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Volume Editors: Anna Motta and Federico M. Petrucci
This book explores how introductory methods shaped school practice and intellectual activity in various fields of thought of the post-Hellenistic Age and Late Antiquity. The isagogical crossroads—the intersection of philosophical, philological, religious and scientific introductory methods—embody a fascinating narrative of the methods regulating ancient readers' approach to authoritative texts and disciplines. The strongly innovative character of this book consists exactly in the attempt to explore isagogical issues in a wide-ranging and comprehensive perspective—from philosophy to religion, from medicine to exact sciences—with the aim of exploiting connections, reciprocal influences, and interactions shaping the intellectual environment of the post-Hellenistic Age and Late Antiquity.
Documents from Antiquity to the 16th Century in the Historical West (Bactria to the Atlantic)
Editor: Dimitri Gutas
From antiquity to the 16 th century, translation united culturally the peoples in the historical West (from Bactria to the shores of the Atlantic) and fueled the production and circulation of knowledge. The Hellenic scientific and philosophical curriculum was translated from and into, to mention the most prevalent languages, Greek, Syriac, Middle Persian, Arabic, Hebrew, and Latin.
To fill a lack in existing scholarship, this volume collects the documents that present the insider evidence provided in contemporary accounts of the motivations and purposes of translation given in the personal statements by the agents in this process, the translators, scholars, and historians of each society. Presented in the original languages with an English translation and introductory essays, these documents offer material for the study of the historical contextualization of the translations, the social history of science and philosophy in their interplay with traditional beliefs, and the cultural policies and ideological underpinnings of these societies.

Contributors
Michael Angold, Pieter Buellens, Charles Burnett, David Cohen, Gad Freudenthal, Dag Nikolaus Hasse, Anthony Kaldellis, Daniel King, Felix Mundt, Ignacio Sánchez, Isabel Toral, Uwe Vagelpohl, and Mohsen Zakeri.
Volume Editors: Daniel Vázquez and Alberto Ross
The way Plato discusses time and its relation to the cosmos has puzzled and divided his readers from the very beginning. This originated rich and diverse readings that shaped and contributed to the cosmological discussion of the Hellenistic and Late Antiquity periods. Modern scholars too, have offered many and often opposed views on the matter.

This book assembles an international team of scholars to move forward the study of Plato’s conception of time, to find fresh insights for interpreting his cosmology, and to reimagine the ancient Platonic tradition.
Volume Editors: Gordon McOuat and Larry Stewart
Where did we do science in the Enlightenment and why? This volume brings together leading historians of Early Modern science to explore the places, spaces, and exchanges of Enlightenment knowledge production. Adding to our understanding of the “geographies of knowledge”, it examines the relationship between “space” and “place”, institutions, “objects”, and “ideas”, showing the ways in which the location of science really matters.

Contributors are Robert Iliffe, Victor Boantza, Margaret Carlyle, Jasmine Kilburn-Toppin, Trevor H. Levere, Alice Marples, Gordon McOuat, Larry Stewart, Marie Thébaud-Sorger, and Simon Werrett.
The Anthology of the Works of Ugo Spirito captures the trajectory of Ugo Spirito’s complex body of thought that spanned more than fifty years, from 1921 to 1977. While confronting difficult contemporary problems related to philosophy and science, liberalism and socialism, fascism and communism, and other economic and ideological aspects such as corporativism and democracy, Spirito revealed a persistent desire to reach truth and the absolute. Yet, he also voiced his failure to remain faithful to any philosophical or political system considered definitive and unquestionable. Unable to reach incontrovertibility, he consistently dissected the prevailing contemporary ideas and systems, including his own beliefs, developing at the same time the ‘antinomic’ approach, a method of critical analysis that undermined any truth reputed irrefutable. Today, Spirito stands as one of most anti-conformist Italian thinkers for he challenged the certainties of modern thought.
Coenraad Jacob Temminck and the Emergence of Systematics (1800–1850) is the first study to examine in detail the life and work of Coenraad Jacob Temminck (1778–1858), the Dutch naturalist who was the first director of ’s Rijks Museum van Natuurlijke Historie (National Museum of Natural History) in Leiden, The Netherlands. This study situates Temminck’s activities in the context of European natural history during the early to the mid-nineteenth century. Three issues which defined the era are discussed in more detail: the growing European colonial territories, the rise of scientific meritocracy, and the emergence of systematics as a discipline. Temminck’s biography elucidates how and why systematics developed, and why its status within the natural sciences has been a matter of discussion for more than a century.
Hegels Wissenschaft der Logik als Paradigma moderner Subjektivität
Volume Editors: Folko Zander and Klaus Vieweg
Die Wissenschaft der Logik kann ohne Zweifel als das Hauptwerk Hegels mit epochemachender Bedeutung gelten. Die Beiträge dieses Bandes machen deutlich, dass es sich um eine moderne Logik handelt, die gegen das Märchen vom sogenannten ‚nachmetaphysischen‘ Zeitalter eine die vormalige Metaphysik aufhebende neue Metaphysik bietet und damit eine revolutionäre Zäsur in der Philosophiegeschichte darstellt. Es wird nachgewiesen, dass Hegels Logik ein sich schlüssig entfaltendes System der Bestimmungen des reinen Denkens und mit dem Verständnis des Begriffs als Freien das Paradigma moderner Subjektivität liefert – im klaren Unterschied zu den im Formalismus erstarrten Kalkülen und der toten Rechenmaschinerien analytischer Logiken.
The Science of Logic can undoubtedly be considered Hegel's major work of epoch-making significance. The contributions of this volume make it clear that it is a modern logic which, against the fairy tale of the so-called 'post-metaphysical' age, offers a new metaphysics which sublates the former metaphysics and thus represents a revolutionary break in the history of philosophy. It is demonstrated that Hegel's logic provides a coherently unfolding system of the determinations of pure thought and, with the understanding of the concept as free, the paradigm of modern subjectivity - in clear contrast to the calculi ossified in formalism and the dead calculating machinery of analytic logics.
Interdisciplinary Reflections
Editor: Jan G. Michel
Scientific progress depends crucially on scientific discoveries. Yet the topic of scientific discoveries has not been central to debate in the philosophy of science. This book aims to remedy this shortcoming. Based on a broad reading of the term “science” (similar to the German term “Wissenschaft ”), the book convenes experts from different disciplines who reflect upon several intertwined questions connected to the topic of making scientific discoveries.
Among these questions are the following: What are the preconditions for making scientific discoveries? What is it that we (have to) do when we make discoveries in science? What are the objects of scientific discoveries, how do we name them, and how do scientific names function? Do dis-coveries in, say, physics and biology, share an underlying structure, or do they differ from each other in crucial ways? Are other fields such as theology and environmental studies loci of scientific discovery? What is the purpose of making scientific discoveries? Explaining nature or reality? Increasing scientific knowledge? Finding new truths? If so, how can we account for instructive blunders and serendipities in science?
In the light of the above, the following is an encompassing question of the book: What does it mean to make a discovery in science, and how can scientific discoveries be distinguished from non-scientific discoveries?
Author: Zhaoyuan WAN
WAN Zhaoyuan analyses how Chinese intellectuals conceived of the relationship between ‘science’ and ‘religion’ through in-depth examination of the writings of Kang Youwei, a prominent political reformer and radical Confucian thinker, often referred to by his disciples as the ‘Martin Luther of Confucianism’.
Confronted with the rise of scientism and challenged by the Conflict Thesis during his life among adversarial Chinese New Culture intellectuals, Kang maintains a holistic yet evolving conception of a compatible and complementary relationship between scientific knowledge and ‘true religion’ exemplified by his Confucian religion ( kongjiao). This close analysis of Kang’s ideas contributes to a richer understanding of the history of science and religion in China and in a more global context.
Author: Doru Costache
In this volume, Costache endeavours to map the world as it was understood and experienced by the early Christians. Progressing from initial fears, they came to adopt a more positive view of the world through successive shifts of perception.
This did not happen overnight. Tracing these shifts, Costache considers the world of the early Christians through an interdisciplinary lens, revealing its meaningful complexity. He demonstrates that the early Christian worldview developed at the nexus of several perspectives. What facilitated this process was above all the experience of contemplating nature. When accompanied by genuine personal transformation, natural contemplation fostered the theological interpretation of the world as it had been known to the ancients.