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A History of Russo-Japanese Relations

Over Two Centuries of Cooperation and Competition

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Edited by Dmitry Streltsov and Nobuo Shimotomai

This publication is the result of a three-year research project between eminent Russian and Japanese historians. Offering an in-depth analysis of the history of relations between Russia and Japan from the eighteenth century until the present day, the format of the publication as a parallel history presents views and interpretations from Russian and Japanese perspectives that showcase the differences and the similarities in their joint history. The fourteen core sections, organized along chronological lines, provide assessments on the complex and sensitive issues of bilateral Russo-Japanese relations, including the territory problem as well as economic exchange.
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Edited by Karl A.E. Enenkel and Jan de Jong

This volume explores the early modern manuals on travelling ( Artes apodemicae), a new genre of advice literature that originated in the sixteenth century, when it became communis opinio among intellectuals that travelling was an important means of acquiring knowledge and experience, and that an extended tour abroad was a vital, if not indispensable part of humanist, academic and political education. In this volume, the formation of this new genre, between 1550 and 1700, is studied in its historical, social and cultural context. Furthermore, the volume examines the impact of this new genre on the acquisition and collection of knowledge in the early modern period, empirical or otherwise.

Contributors include: Justin Stagl, Karl Enenkel, Jan Papy, Thomas Haye, Robert Seidel, Gabor Gelléri, Bernd Roling, Harald Hendrix, Jan L. de Jong, Kerstin Maria Pahl, Johanna Luggin, Marc Laureys, and Justina Spencer.
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Ismail Lala

Can we know God or does he reside beyond our ken? In Ibn ʿArabī and ʿAbd al-Razzāq al-Qāshānī’s Metaphysics of the Divine, Ismail Lala conducts a forensic analysis of the nature of God and His interaction with the creation. Looking mainly at the exegetical works of the influential mystic, Muḥyī al-Dīn ibn ʿArabī (d. 638/1240), and one of his chief disseminators, ʿAbd al-Razzāq al-Qāshānī (d. 736/1335?), Lala employs the term huwiyya, literally “He-ness,” as an aperture into the metaphysical worldview of both mystics. Does Al-Qāshānī agree with Ibn ʿArabī’s conception of God? Does he agree with Ibn ʿArabī on how God relates to us and how we relate to Him? Or is this where Sufi master and his disciple part ways?
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Valentina Lepri

Knowledge Transfer and the Early Modern University focuses on the teaching and cultural activities of the Akademia Zamojska, one of the most renowned universities of Central-Eastern Europe in the Early Modern Age. The Akademia Zamojska played its own part in the debate on the methodology of politics as a discipline, also offering an original contribution to the development of the concept of ‘political prudence’ which was to become so popular in the universities of Central Europe in this period. The institution embodied a largely successful attempt to knit up closer connections between the world of intellectual culture and that of political praxis.
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Kreative Gegensätze

Der Streit um den Nutzen der Philosophie an der mittelalterlichen Pariser Universität

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Marcel Bubert

In Kreative Gegensätze Marcel Bubert analyses the debates among medieval scholastics on the social usefulness of learned knowledge in their specific social and cultural contexts. In particular, he shows how the skepticism towards the scholars as well as the tensions between the University of Paris, the French royal court, and the citizens of Paris had profound effects on the scientific community, and led to very different views on the utility of philosophy. Some Masters responded to the expectations of society by emphasizing the autonomy of philosophical cognition. Others departed radically from this notion of science “for its own sake”, and created decidedly “practical” concepts of knowledge. The examination of these contentious relations shows how the dynamics of mutual demarcation within this “constellation” became intellectually prolific by way of generating highly original and innovative responses to the question of the utility of philosophy.
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Liberalism, Constitutional Nationalism, and Minorities

The Making of Romanian Citizenship, c. 1750–1918

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Constantin Iordachi

The book documents the making of Romanian citizenship from 1750 to 1918 as a series of acts of emancipation of subordinated groups (Greeks, Jews, Gypsies/Roma, Armenians, Muslims, peasants, women, and Dobrudjans). It emphasizes the fusion between nationalism and liberalism, and the emancipatory impact national-liberalism had on the transition from the Old Regime to the modern order of the nation-state. While emphasizing liberalism’s many achievements, the analysis critically scrutinizes the liberal doctrine of legal-political ‘capacity’ and the dark side of nationalism, marked by tendencies toward exclusion. The study highlights the challenges nascent liberal democracies face in the process of consolidation and the enduring appeal of illiberalism in periods of upheaval, represented mainly by nativism. The book’s innovative interdisciplinary approach to citizenship in the Ottoman and post-Ottoman Balkans, and the richness of the sources employed appeal to a diverse readership.
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Northern Myths, Modern Identities

The Nationalisation of Northern Mythologies Since 1800

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Edited by Simon Halink

This anthology of essays, Northern Myths, Modern Identities, explores the various ways in which ancient mythologies have been cultivated in the cultural construction of ethnic, national and supra-national identities from 1800 to the present. How were Old Norse, Finno-Ugric and Frisian myths employed as rhetorical devices in national narratives? And how did (and do) these new interpretations convey a sense of ‘northernness’? This volume approaches these issues from an interdisciplinary and international perspective, and brings together case studies from Scandinavia, the Baltic region, Friesland, Britain, the United States and even Japan. Thus, it provides a unique insight into the reception history and uses of northern myths in the present, and their role in the creation of modern identities.

Contributors are: Tim van Gerven, Gylfi Gunnlaugsson, Simon Halink, Sumarliði R. Ísleifsson, Otto S. Knottnerus, Joep Leerssen, Daisy Neijmann, Han Nijdam, Robert A. Saunders, Katja Schulz, Tom Shippey, Carline Tromp, and Kendra Willson.
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Edited by Pedro Querido and María Ibáñez-Rodríguez

This volume brings together essays that examine a vast gamut of different contemporary cultural manifestations of fear, anxiety, horror, and terror. Topics range from the feminine sublime in American novels to the monstrous double in horror fiction, (in)security at music festivals, the uncanny in graphic novels, epic heroes' Being-towards-death and authenticity, atrocity and history in Central European art, the theme of old age in absurdist literature, and iterations of the "home invasion" subgenre in post-9/11 popular culture. This diversity of insights and methodologies ensures a kaleidoscopic look at a cluster of phenomena and experiences that often manage to both be immediately and universally recognizable and defy straightforward categorization or even description. Contributors are Emily-Rose Carr, Ghada Saad Hassan, Woodrow Hood, María Ibáñez-Rodríguez, Nicole M. Jowsey, Marta Moore, Pedro Querido and Ana Romão.
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Public Diplomacy at Home

Domestic Dimensions

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Huijgh Ellen

This book is about the domestic dimension of public diplomacy, which must be understood within the context of public diplomacy’s evolution over time. In the virtually connected world of today, newcomers such as supranational organizations, sub-states and Asian countries have had less difficulty than Western nation-states including a domestic dimension in public diplomacy. Doing so does not separate the domestic and international components; rather, it highlights that there is a holistic/integrative approach to public involvement at home and abroad. In Huijgh’s comprehensive analysis, including case studies from North America, Europa and the Asia-Pacific, public diplomacy’s international and domestic dimensions can be seen as stepping stones on a continuum of public participation that is central to international policymaking and conduct.
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Ahmed Oulddali

Dans cet ouvrage, Ahmed Oulddali étudie les idées psychologiques et épistémologiques qui sous-tendent l’exégèse spéculative de Faḫr al-Dīn al-Rāzī. Connu pour être l’un des rares théologiens musulmans à avoir proposé une interprétation philosophique du Coran, Rāzī se révèle ici un penseur novateur, profondément convaincu de la nécessité de prendre appui sur les sciences et les méthodes rationnelles pour appréhender la révélation. Son rejet formel du littéralisme et ses multiples emprunts à la philosophie d’Avicenne apparaissent comme la conséquence d’une conception de la connaissance dans laquelle la raison joue un rôle déterminant. Basée sur une documentation très riche, comprenant de nombreuses sources arabes, la présente étude offre une vue d’ensemble des enjeux philosophiques, théologiques et exégétiques auxquels répond la pensée de Rāzī. In Reason and Revelation in Islam, Ahmed Oulddali presents the psychological and epistemological ideas which underlie Faḫr al-Dīn al-Rāzī’s speculative exegesis. Known as one of the few Muslim theologians to have proposed a philosophical interpretation of the Qurʾān, Rāzī appears here as an innovative thinker, deeply convinced of the need to rely on rational methods to understand revelation. His formal rejection of literalism and his multiple borrowings from Avicenna’s philosophy are explained as a consequence of a conception of knowledge in which reason plays a decisive role. Richly infused with illustrative texts and original translations from Arab sources, Oulddali’s book offers an overview of the philosophical, theological and exegetical issues to which the thinking of Rāzī responds.