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Case Studies in the Construction of High Achievement
What is it like to be YOUNG, GIFTED AND WORKING CLASS in contemporary England? How do working class family values support high educational achievement? What do researchers and policy makers have to learn about giftedness from working class families?
These provocative questions are explored in this ground-breaking book. Most studies of giftedness focus on the characteristics of individuals, and draw upon psychological frameworks to understand them. Participants in most gifted education programmes are recruited disproportionately from the higher social classes. Sceptical of the concept of giftedness, Mazzoli Smith and Campbell question conventional methodologies, using a narrative approach to understand how four families of working class origins, each with a gifted child, construct their values in relation to education and social class. They explore the influence of their family histories, cultural values and life styles upon educational engagement and achievement.
The authors show that gifted education policies are poorly matched to the values of these families and argue that much research into giftedness has been flawed by social and cultural discrimination. They propose an agenda for change in research paradigms in the giftedness field, which should be characterized by interdisciplinarity and more culturally relative conceptions of giftedness.
Supervising Practices for Postgraduate Research in Art, Architecture and Design offers insights into supervisory practices in creative and design-based research by academics at Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology (RMIT) University, Australia. The book focuses on practices of supervising candidates who are undertaking postgraduate research in art, architecture, design and creative writing. It addresses a decisive shift in the academy towards an emphasis on applied practice-led research undertaken through project-based investigations. This model articulates an effective means to conduct research on knowledge both embodied in, and discovered through creative and design practices. Such knowledge can be understood in the context of broad socio-cultural changes in which creative and applied practice is defining and leading cultural, scientific, technological and creative economies.
The contributors to this book investigate a range of supervisory strategies and wider concerns to do with knowledge and its formations. They focus on diverse pedagogical models and methodologies of supervising practices through applied practice-led research, exhibitions, ethics, writing, theory and practice, language and design. The authors are experienced supervisors of creative and practice-led research who have engaged in scholarly reflections on selective aspects of their supervisory practices with the aim of providing insight to others regarding what they do, and how and why they do it. The overall aim of this collection is to open up dialogue and debate around emerging modes of postgraduate research and supervisory practice in universities of the twenty-first century.
Using Drama to Create Possibilities for Change
Acting on HIV offers a sustained and relatively systematic inquiry into drama as an approach to discussion of HIV/AIDS and related attitudes and behaviors. A distinctive feature of the research that is presented in Acting on HIV is the emphasis on the potential for and value of using drama to promote vital social change in addition to individual behaviour change. It has a strong theoretical foundation and seeks to interrogate the ethical, theoretical and practical complexities of using drama to address issues HIV & AIDS. The research that is communicated through the book is original and timely and will make a significant, trans-disciplinary contribution to scholarly conversations about the role/s and significance of drama in addressing issues of HIV & AIDS. Acting on HIV will have appeal to scholars working within drama and performance studies and those involved in interdisciplinary work or working in the fields of social work, education, sociology, psychology, cultural and media studies, gender studies, criminology, and critical human and social sciences generally including studies of HIV, sexuality and public health among others. Furthermore, the book targets community practitioners, teachers and researchers interested in drama for social change; arts based research methods and drama in education.
Pedagogies against the State
In this book the notions of real learning and equality are approached as processes of becoming leading to the figuration of new worlds through local curations of learning and practice. Though its main theses are mainly grounded in the context of art practice and education they have a much wider application to other (perhaps all) contexts of learning through the notions of pedagogies against the state and pedagogies of the event. Learning is conceived as a political act rather than, for example, an incremental process of psychological or sociological development. Most chapters of the book deal with a series of tensions between tradition and the new; between art in education and contemporary art; between ontologies of practice and epistemologies of assessment; between socio-cultural notions of difference and an egalitarian notion of the Same, between an ethics of reality, of established values, principles and practices and an ethics of the real; between the different ontological domains of the artist and the teacher which are brought together in the constituency of the artist-teacher, between knowledge and not-knowing, between know¬ledge and truth. The intention is not to resolve such tensions as such attempted resolution will always be incomplete, rather they are discussed in the spirit of an imperative to decide what kind of future we want for pedagogical spaces of teaching and learning. The text draws upon key ideas from the philosophical work of Alain Badiou, Judith Butler, Jacques Ranciere, Slavoj Zizek, Jacques Lacan and others and these are applied to pedagogical spaces in order to initiate a debate about teaching and learning. The book raises some important questions relating to subjectification, ethics, multiculturalism and the struggles inherent to the tensionalities of becoming an artist-teacher.
How to Embed Creativity into the Curriculum
Educating Music Teachers for the 21st Century discusses a range of teacher education programmes in music across Europe and Latin America reflecting about the shifting conditions, causes and factors in which pre-service teachers construct their musical and educational knowledge. It presents seven case studies carried out in Argentina, Brazil, Mexico, Portugal, Spain, and Sweden in order to understand the general and specific elements of new thinking in music education, and the ways these relate to the profound changes all of these countries are experiencing, within the era of cultural globalisation.
In this way, this book does not only analyse specific programmes but also seeks to explore a range of issues relating to the education of music teachers that is of interest both to scholars working within music education and music teacher training, and to a wider educational audience of readers interested in such topics as changing youth cultures, globalisation, educational evaluation and teacher education.
The Elements of Creativity and Giftedness in Mathematics, edited by Bharath Sriraman and KyeongHwa Lee, covers recent advances in mathematics education pertaining to the development of creativity and giftedness.
The book is international in scope in the “sense” that it includes numerous studies on mathematical creativity and giftedness conducted in the U. S. A, China, Korea, Turkey, Israel, Sweden, and Norway in addition to cross-national perspectives from Canada and Russia. The topics include problem -posing, problem-solving and mathematical creativity; the development of mathematical creativity with students, pre and in-service teachers; cross-cultural views of creativity and giftedness; the unpacking of notions and labels such as high achieving, inclusion, and potential; as well as the theoretical state of the art on the constructs of mathematical creativity and giftedness. The book also includes some contributions from the first joint meeting of the American Mathematical Society and the Korean Mathematical Society in Seoul, 2009. Topics covered in the book are essential reading for graduate students and researchers interested in researching issues and topics within the domain of mathematical creativity and mathematical giftedness. It is also accessible to pre-service and practicing teachers interested in developing creativity in their classrooms, in addition to professional development specialists, mathematics educators, gifted educators, and psychologists.
Key Concepts in Theatre/Drama Education provides the first comprehensive survey of contemporary research trends in theatre/drama education. It is an intriguing rainbow of thought, celebrating a journey across three fields of scholarship: theatre, education and modes of knowing. Hitherto no other collection of key concepts has been published in theatre /drama education. Fifty seven entries, written by sixty scholars from across the world aim to convey the zeitgeist of the field. The book’s key innovation lies in its method of writing, through collaborative networking, an open peer-review process, and meaning-making involving all contributors. Within the framework of key-concept entries, readers will find valuable judgments and the viewpoints of researchers from North and South America, Europe, Asia, Africa, New Zealand and Australia. The volume clearly shows that drama/theatre educators and researchers have created a language, with its own grammar and lucid syntax. The concepts outlined convey the current knowledge of scholars, highlighting what they consider significant. Entries cover interdependent topics on teaching and learning, aesthetics and ethics, curricula and history, culture and community, various populations and their needs, theatre for young people, digital technology, narrative and pedagogy, research methods, Shakespeare and Brecht, other various modes of theatre and the education of theatre teachers.
This book uses a nine-year experience of teaching world mythology to art students in order to discuss why and how such ancient stories provide significance today. Myth’s weird images and metaphors recall Wyrd (Word), the goddess of the cauldron. Students can be guided into the cauldron of mythic language to feel the stirring of new awareness of what it really means to be human. Psychologically, myth offers insights into family relations, memory, imagination, and otherness. Ecological insights from myth teach the connection among human-animal-plant relations and the organicism of all life forms. Cosmological insights from myth surprisingly echo findings in new science, with its emphasis on quantum mechanics, force fields, black holes, subatomic particles, chaos, and the possibilities of time travel. Two areas often considered completely opposite—myth and science—actually reflect one another, since both propose theories, albeit in different ways. Myth cannot be laughed away as “mere” fabula, since, like science and psychology, it has long explored adventures into unseen, unknown worlds that yield necessary knowledge about the place of humans in the scheme of things big and small.
The “more” of myth will be of interest to teachers and students of curriculum studies, to those seeking to go beyond Oedipus and Gutenberg, and to readers who know that all forms of life (including fingernails and rocks) are wondrous, diverse, alive, capable, purposive, and necessary.
Teacher Inquiries on Creative Tactics, Strategies, Graphics Organizers, and Visual Journals in the K-12 Classroom
This is a book for teachers, by teachers, from elementary school to university level classrooms. It is about the use of creative instructional strategies in K-12 class­room settings, and the transformations the teachers made in their journeys from being traditional practitioners to “becoming pedagogical” in their approaches to teaching and learning across the curriculum.
Over twenty teachers conducted research in their classrooms on the implementation of creative strategies, tactics, graphics organizers, and visual journals in teaching and learning. They have written their inquiries in a narrative style, informed by various forms of arts based educational research. Their research is approachable and usable by other teachers who are interested in becoming reflective-reflexive practitioners. Many of the strategies, tactics, and graphics organizers are described by Barrie Bennett in his widely used textbook, Beyond Monet: The Artful Science of Instructional Intelligence. However, through their journeys of becoming teacher-learner-researchers, many discovered numerous, creative variations of Bennett’s work as it was implemented in their classrooms.
While there are many professional books that provide ideas on collaborative learning and creative teaching approaches, there is very little published research on the efficacy of these concepts in the K-12 classroom. These inquiries provide practical insights into how inspired teachers can conduct research on improving their own practice as well as on greatly improving their students’ learning.