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Construction Processes and Transmission of Knowledge from Late Antiquity to Early Islam
Volume Editor: Piero Gilento
This edited volume examines the construction processes and the mechanisms of transmission of knowledge between the eastern and western Mediterranean lands from the late Roman period to the early centuries of Islam. The essays explore issues of material culture, craft techniques, technological and typological changes and cultural contacts in Syria, Jordan, North Africa and Spain. The volume includes case studies on prestigious architectural complexes, defensive systems and other structures located in major urban centres (Cyrrhus, Bosra, Jerash, Sousse, Kairouan and Cordoba), as well as minor sites and rural buildings. It offers a fresh contribution to the long-lasting historiographic debate on the transition from antiquity to the Middle Ages and how Early Islamic architecture fostered the structural assumptions for new building experiences in many Mediterranean regions.

Contributors: Antonio Almagro, Shaker Al Shbib, Stefano Anastasio, Ignacio Arce, Jean-Claude Bessac, Pascale Clauss-Balty, Piero Gilento, Mattia Guidetti, Pedro Gurriarán Daza, Roberto Parenti, Pauline Piraud-Fournet, María de los Ángeles Utrero Agudo, Jean-Pierre van Staëvel, Apolline Vernet, François Villeneuve.
Ambiguität, Liminalität und Konversion
Author: Tobias Frese
Frühmittelalterliche Bilder der Christophanie irritieren den Betrachter oftmals durch widersprüchliche Aussagen. Das Buch analysiert prominente Fallbeispiele in neuen Perspektiven.
Doppeldeutigkeiten in der mittelalterlichen Kunst wurden von der kunsthistorischen Forschung lange Zeit unterschätzt oder gänzlich ignoriert. Dies resultierte aus dem traditionellen Anliegen der ikonographischen Interpretationspraxis, christliche Bildinhalte möglichst eindeutig zu bestimmen. Motivische Widersprüchlichkeiten wurden zumeist als Ausnahmen disqualifiziert, auf pragmatische Gründe zurückgeführt oder als künstlerische Fehler abgetan. Im Buch wird anhand mehrerer Fallbeispiele dargelegt, dass diese Sicht der komplexen Bildlogik vieler prominenter Christusbilder des frühen Mittelalters nicht gerecht wird.
Volume Editor: Anti Selart
The Baltic Crusades in the thirteenth century led to the creation of the medieval Livonia. But what happened after the conquest? The contributors to this volume analyse the cultural, societal, economic and technological changes in the Baltic Sea region c. 1200–1350. The chapters focus on innovations and long-term developments which were important in integrating the area into medieval European society more broadly, while also questioning the traditional divide of the Livonian post-crusade society into native victims and foreign victors. The process of multilateral negotiations and adaptions created a synthesis which was not necessarily an outcome of the wars but also a manifestation of universal innovation processes in northern Europe.
Contributors are Arvi Haak, Tõnno Jonuks, Kristjan Kaljusaar, Ivar Leimus, Christian Lübke, Madis Maasing, Mihkel Mäesalu, Anti Selart, Vija Stikāne, and Andres Tvauri.
The Evolution of a Japanese Folk Deity from Hell Figure to Popular Savior
Author: Chihiro Saka
Flemish Art and Artists in Seventeenth-Century Madrid
In Painting Flanders Abroad: Flemish Art and Artists in Seventeenth-Century Madrid, Flemish immigrants and imported Flemish paintings cross the paths of Spanish kings, collectors, dealers, and artists in the Spanish court city, transforming the development and nature of seventeenth-century Spanish painting. Examining these Flemish transplants and the traces their interactions left in archival documents, collection inventories, art treatises, and most saliently Spanish “Golden Age” paintings, this book portrays Spanish society grappling with a long tradition of importing its favorite paintings while struggling to reimagine its own visual idiom. In the process, the book historicizes questions of style, quality, immigration, mobility, identity, and cultural exchange to define what the evolving and amorphous visual concept of “Flemishness” meant to Spanish viewers in an era long before the emergence of nationalism.
Judging Old Masters at Agnew’s and the National Gallery, c.1874-1916
Author: Alison Clarke
In Spaces of Connoisseurship, Alison Clarke explores the ‘who’, ‘where’ and ‘how’ of judging Old Master paintings in the nineteenth-century British art trade. She describes how the staff at family art dealers Thomas Agnew & Sons (“Agnew’s”) and London’s National Gallery took advantage of emerging technologies such as the railways and photography. Through encounters with pictures in a range of locations, both private and public, these art market actors could build up the visual memory and necessary expertise to compare artworks and judge them in terms of attribution, condition and beauty. Also explored are the display tactics adopted by both commercial outfit and art museum to showcase pictures once acquired. In a time of ever-spiralling art prices, this book tackles the question of why some paintings are preferred over others, and exactly how art experts reach their judgements.
Formgenealogien in der Gegenwartsarchitektur
Author: Jennifer Bleek
Die Studie verfolgt den Ansatz, das Architekturornament nicht im Rahmen einer Formgeschichte zu behandeln, sondern die Historie in den Werken selbst im Sinne einer anschaulichen Kunstgeschichte zu suchen.
Dabei finden kommunikative Potenziale des Ornaments Beachtung, wie beim Ministère de la Culture in Paris, das zwischen der Materialität des Details und dem vom Jugendstil geprägten Stadtraum vermittelt. Historische Referenzen treten etwa bei Herzog & de Meuron und Hild u K auf und bezeugen das hier zu definierende Geschichtsverständnis der gegenwärtigen Architektur. Fundierend auf Theorien von Fiedler und Wölfflin und bezugnehmend auf die Architekturmoderne wird für eine Begriffserweiterung des kontemporären Ornaments plädiert.
Practices and Rituals, Visual and Material Transfer
Volume Editors: Yukiyo Kasai and Henrik H. Sørensen
The ERC-funded research project BuddhistRoad aims to create a new framework to enable understanding of the complexities in the dynamics of cultural encounter and religious transfer in pre-modern Eastern Central Asia. Buddhism was one major factor in this exchange: for the first time the multi-layered relationships between the trans-regional Buddhist traditions (Chinese, Indian, Tibetan) and those based on local Buddhist cultures (Khotanese, Uyghur, Tangut) will be explored in a systematic way. The second volume Buddhism in Central Asia II—Practice and Rituals, Visual and Materials Transfer based on the mid-project conference held on September 16th–18th, 2019, at CERES, Ruhr-Universität Bochum (Germany) focuses on two of the six thematic topics addressed by the project, namely on “practices and rituals”, exploring material culture in religious context such as mandalas and talismans, as well as “visual and material transfer”, including shared iconographies and the spread of ‘Khotanese’ themes.
Author: Helen Sills
If, as Robert Craft remarked, ‘religious beliefs were at the core of Stravinsky’s life and work’, why have they not figured more prominently in discussions of his works?
Stravinsky’s coordination of the listener with time is central to the unity of his compositional style. This ground-breaking study looks at his background in Russian Orthodoxy, at less well-known writings of Arthur Lourié and Pierre Souvtchinsky and at the Catholic philosophy of Jacques Maritain, that shed light on the crucial link between Stravinsky’s spirituality and his restoration of time in music.
Recent neuroscience research supports Stravinsky’s eventual adoption of serialism as the natural and logical outcome of his spiritual and musical quest.
Little is known about the Christianization of east-central and eastern Europe, due to the fragmentary nature of the historical record. Yet occasionally, unexpected archaeological discoveries can offer fresh angles and new insights. This volume presents such an example: the discovery of a Byzantine-like church in Alba Iulia, Transylvania, dating from the 10th century - a unique find in terms of both age and function. Next to its ruins, another church was built at the end of the 11th century, following a Roman Catholic architectural model, soon to become the seat of the Latin bishopric of Transylvania.

Who built the older, Byzantine-style church, and what was the political, religious and cultural context of the church? How does this new discovery affect our perception of the ecclesiastical history of Transylvania? A new reading of the archaeological and historical record prompted by these questions is presented here, thereby opening up new challenges for further research.

Contributors are: Daniela Marcu Istrate, Florin Curta, Horia I. Ciugudean, Aurel Dragotă, Monica-Elena Popescu, Călin Cosma, Tudor Sălăgean, Jan Nicolae, Dan Ioan Mureșan, Alexandru Madgearu, Gábor Thoroczkay, Éva Tóth-Révész, Boris Stojkovski, Șerban Turcuș, Adinel C. Dincă, Mihai Kovács, Nicolae Călin Chifăr, Marius Mihail Păsculescu, and Ana Dumitran.