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Der Tod der schönen Antike
1862 erscheint Gustave Flauberts Roman Salammbô. Ort und Handlung sind in ferner Vergangenheit angesiedelt. Karthago ist ein blinder Fleck auf der Landkarte der historischen Überlieferung. Gerade deswegen wählt Flaubert diese Stadt.
Nordafrikanische Landschaften, Stadtansichten der Seerepublik Karthago, pompöser Reichtum und kulturelle Artifizialität in Speisen, Sitten und Kleidung, monumentale Schlachten, grausame Bilder des Krieges und der ausschweifenden Gewalt an Mensch und Tier bilden die Szenen des neuen Romans. »Leute von schlechtem Geschmack« sind nach Flaubert solche, die »verschönern, reinigen und sich illusionieren, die verändern, kratzen und wegnehmen« und gleichwohl meinen, sie seien Klassiker. Die Aufsprengung der normativen Antike-Ansicht bedeutet für Flaubert, Klischees und abgenutzte Phrasen aufzubrechen neue Sprachformen zu erfinden. Er eröffnet damit den Blick auf eine archaische Antike und auf das Phänomen der Gewalt in der Moderne.
Volume Editors: Clifford Davidson and Sophie Oosterwijk
This edition of Lydgate’s Dance of Death offers a detailed comparison of the different text versions, a new scholarly edition and translation of Marchant’s 1485 French Danse Macabre and an art-historical analysis of its woodcuts.
It addresses the cultural context and historical circumstances of Lydgate’s poem and its model, the mural of 1424-25 with accompanying French poem in Paris, as well as their precursors, notably the Vado mori poems and the Legend of the Three Living and the Three Dead. It discusses authorship, the personification and visualisation of Death, and the wider dissemination of the Dance. The edited texts include commentaries, notes and a glossary.
Variations on Racinian Excuses
Author: Edward Forman
This comparative literary study re-evaluates the reciprocal relationship between tragic drama and current approaches to guilt and extenuation. Focussing on Racine but ranging widely, it sheds original light on tragic archetypes (Phaedra, Oedipus, Clytemnestra, Medea and others) through the lenses of performance theory and modern attitudes towards blame.
Tragic drama and legal systems both aim to evaluate the merits of excuses provided on behalf of perpetrators of catastrophic acts. Edward Forman wittily and provocatively explores modern judicial concepts – diminished responsibility, provocation, trauma, ignorance, scapegoating – through the responses of characters in tragedy. Attention is paid to the way in which classical plays (ancient Greek and seventeenth-century French) have been re-interpreted in performance in the light of modern perceptions of human responsibility and helplessness.
The sixteenth-century French poets Pierre de Ronsard and Guillaume Du Bartas enjoyed a wide, immediate and long-lasting, but varied and mixed reception throughout early modern Europe. Ronsard and Du Bartas in Early Modern Europe is the first book-length volume to explore the transnational reception histories of both poets in conjunction with each other. It takes into account the great variety of their readerships, including translators, imitating poets, poetical theorists, illustrators and painters, both male and female (Marie de Gournay, Anne Bradstreet), some of them illustrious (Tasso, King James VI and I of Scotland and England, Opitz…), others less known, even obscure, but worth to be saved from oblivion (such as the French Marc-Antoine Chalon, the English Mary Roper, and the Dutch poet Philibert van Borsselen). This volume offers a fascinating insight into the different reception modes in Europe and their underlying political, religious and literary identities.

Contributors include: Peter Auger, Denis Bjaï, Karel Bostoen †, Philippe Chométy, Paola Cosentino, Violaine Giacomotto-Charra, Alisa van de Haar, Pádraic Lamb, Anne-Pascale Pouey-Mounou, Elisabeth Rothmund, Paul J. Smith, and Caroline Trotot.
In Transcultural Migration in the Novels of Hédi Bouraoui: A New Ulysses, Elizabeth Sabiston analyses the dominant theme of transcultural migration, or immigration, in Hédi Bouraoui’s fiction. His protagonists reflect his passion for endless travel, and are Ulysses-figures for the postmodern age. Their travels enable them to explore the “Otherness of the Other,” to understand and “migrate” into them.
Bouraoui’s World Literature is rooted in the traversées of his characters across a number of clearly differentiated regions, which nonetheless share a common humanity. The ancient migrations of Ulysses, fuelled by violence and war, are paralleled to the modern displacements of entire cultures and even nations. Bouraoui’s works bridge cultures past and present, but they also require the invention of language to convey a postmodern world in flux.
Volume Editors: Kate Averis, Eglė Kačkutė, and Catherine Mao
Transgression(s) in Twenty-First-Century Women's Writing in French analyses the literary transgressions of women’s writing in French since the turn of the twenty-first century in the works of major figures, such as Annie Ernaux and Véronique Tadjo, of the now established writers of the ‘nouvelle génération’, such as Marie Darrieussecq and Virginie Despentes, and in some of the most exciting and innovative authors from across the francosphère, from Nine Antico to Maïssa Bey and Chloé Delaume.
Pushing the boundaries of current thinking about normative and queer identities, local and global communities, family and kinship structures, bodies and sexualities, creativity and the literary canon, these authors pose the potential of reading and writing to also effectuate change in the world beyond the text.

Transgression(s) in Twenty-First-Century Women's Writing in French étudie les transgressions littéraires dans l’écriture des femmes en français depuis le début du XXIe siècle. L’analyse porte sur les oeuvres de figures majeures, telles qu’Annie Ernaux et Véronique Tadjo, d’auteures bien établies de la ‘nouvelle génération’, parmi lesquelles Marie Darrieussecq et Virginie Despentes, et de certaines des auteures les plus innovantes de la francosphère, de Nine Antico à Maïssa Bey en passant par Chloé Delaume. Repoussant les frontières de la pensée dominante sur les identités normatives ou queer, les communautés locales ou globales, les structures familiales ou de parenté, les corps ou les sexualités, la créativité ou le canon littéraire, ces auteures développent un potentiel de lecture et d’écriture porteur de changements au-delà du texte. Contributors /avec des contributions de: Ounissa Ait Benali, Jean Anderson, Kate Averis, Marzia Caporale, Dawn M. Cornelio, Sandra Daroczi, Sophie Guignard, Élise Hugueny-Léger, Irène Le Roy Ladurie, Siobhán McIlvanney, Michèle A. Schaal, Marta Segarra, Marinella Termite, Lyn Thomas, Antonia Wimbush
Author: Meryl Altman
Beauvoir in Time situates Simone de Beauvoir's The Second Sex in the historical context of its writing and in later contexts of its international reception, from then till now. The book takes up three aspects of Beauvoir's work more recent feminists find embarrassing: "bad sex," "dated" views about lesbians, and intersections with race and class. Through close reading of Beauvoir's writing in many genres, alongside contemporaneous discourses (good and bad novels in French and English, outmoded psychoanalytic and sexological authorities, ethnographic surrealism, the writing of Richard Wright and Franz Fanon), and in light of her travels to the U.S. and China, the author uncovers insights more recent feminist methodologies obscure, showing that Beauvoir is still good to think with today.
Volume Editors: Klaus Beekman and Antje von Graevenitz