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Narratives of Teaching for Social Justice and Community
This book incorporates art-based, partnership-oriented inquiry into social justice discourses and advances qualitative research strategies through the medium of three theoretical frameworks: phenomenology, critical ethnographic research, and poststructuralist theories. Maxine Greene's aesthetic theories motivated to create the ARtS initiative and the author explores the possibility of enhancing children’s understanding of active citizenship and community. It illustrates narratives from children in an urban context while they developed a sense of constructive community and active citizenship in an afterschool program called the ARtS (aesthetic, reflexive thoughts, & sharing) initiative.

As a qualitative methodology text, Three Approaches to Qualitative Research through the ARtS explicates theoretical tenets and research strategies in art-based research. This book shows three examples of how to connect a theoretical framework with the analysis of ethnographic data. A nexus between theory and practice enables researchers and practitioners to understand the value of aesthetic-inspired programs to foster democratic citizenship and to advance equity issues. Social justice-oriented teacher educators, qualitative researchers, and artists will explore and learn how the ARtS initiative recognizes the power of art and multiple research methodologies in imagining and representing a community differently and advancing social justice in a challenging time.
Girls and Young Women Speaking Back through the Arts to Address Sexual Violence
Much has been written in Canada and South Africa about sexual violence in the context of colonial legacies, particularly for Indigenous girls and young women. While both countries have attempted to deal with the past through Truth and Reconciliation Commissions and Canada has embarked upon its National Inquiry on Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls, there remains a great deal left to do. Across the two countries, history, legislation and the lived experiences of young people, and especially girls and young women point to a deeply rooted situation of marginalization. Violence on girls’ and women’s bodies also reflects violence on the land and especially issues of dispossession. What approaches and methods would make it possible for girls and young women, as knowers and actors, especially those who are the most marginalized, to influence social policy and social change in the context of sexual violence?

Taken as a whole, the chapters in Disrupting Shameful Legacies: Girls and Young Women Speaking Back through the Arts to Address Sexual Violence which come out of a transnational study on sexual violence suggest a new legacy, one that is based on methodologies that seek to disrupt colonial legacies, by privileging speaking up and speaking back through the arts and visual practice to challenge the situation of sexual violence. At the same time, the fact that so many of the authors of the various chapters are themselves Indigenous young people from either Canada or South Africa also suggests a new legacy of leadership for change.

Emancipatory Pedagogy
People throughout the world have creative minds with unlimited potential for change. The Road to Independence: Emancipatory Pedagogy offers ways to empower people through education so that we can live and prosper together in a sustainable world. The emancipatory pedagogy of innovation and entrepreneurial education is presented as a road to independence: as a way to enable everyone to reach their inherent potential.
This book presents case studies, stories, and research findings from innovation and entrepreneurial education that illuminate the real lives and work of teachers and students from different cultures.
Designing Critical and Creative Learning with Indigenous Youth: A Personal Journey traces the events leading to the creation of Unlocking Silent Histories (USH) and outlines the program’s foundational and methodological principles.
The book opens with an explanation of the author’s struggles with the theory-practice tension, a conflict that has inhibited the widespread adoption and actualization of socially just learning engagements. She then offers her rationale for taking a leave from academia to concentrate fully on developing a critical pedagogy-informed learning design facilitated by combining community-connected inquiry with video ethnography.
The substance of the text focuses on the identified foundational and methodological principles, explained through first-hand accounts of USH’s year-one participants. These youth-centered chapters assist in presenting an argument for employing culturally responsive and socially just educational engagements. At the same time, the chapters illustrate how drawing on youth voice can more broadly contribute to bridging theory and practice in communities that are often disconnected from the larger educational discourse.
The author does not intend to provide a scripted implementation process within USH or of educational in general. Rather she uses first-hand youth accounts in this cultural context to give the reader a lived experience of how a youth-directed, emergent learning path materializes when employing a model that draws on local knowledge and invite youth voice.
USH, an educational non-profit organization created to amplify the voices and identities of indigenous youth through the art of documentary film making, employs an innovative pedagogy that draws upon native knowledge, culture, and voice to create a locally-informed learning design.