Browse results

You are looking at 1 - 2 of 2 items for :

  • Educational Technology x
  • Art Education x
  • Status (Books): Published x
Clear All Modify Search
Editor: Eyvind Elstad
For more than three decades, researchers, policy makers and educationalists have all harboured great expectations towards the use of technology in schools. This belief has received a hard knock after an OECD 2015 report has shown that computers do not improve pupil results: Investing heavily in school computers and classroom technology does not improve pupils’ performance, and frequent use of computers in schools is more likely to be associated with lower results. Educational technology has raised false expectations! The prevailing view of educational technology has shifted. Nevertheless, hardly anyone wishes for a situation in which pupils do not use technology in the service of learning: education is supposed to prepare for the future, and it is evident that technology is one of the answers to the challenges of the future. Many school professionals, however, feel uncertain how schools should tackle challenges relating to the distractions that hamper in-depth learning, easy cut-and-paste solutions and online offensiveness that occur while pupils are at school. The initiative to provide a tablet or PC for each pupil is continuing despite a lack of evidence that it is beneficial to learning. School professionals and policy makers are seeking answers to the question of how schools ought to relate to challenges created by the use of technology in the school.
This book is an attempt to raise questions and start a debate. It presents new research relevant to a better understanding of the challenges and opportunities inherent in educational technology and strategies are discussed in relation to handling these challenges. Rather than presenting ready solutions, the book attempts to provoke debate and to contribute to a firmer grasp on reality. The chapters in this volume offer an up-to-date discussion. The authors do not present a common front on the complex question of the proper use of technology in the school but instead present a diversity of arguments and viewpoints.
Editor: Eyvind Elstad
Technology has become ubiquitous in nearly every contemporary situation, while digital media have acquired considerable importance in the lives of young people. Alongside their interest in digital media, schooling constitutes a core component of the life of children and adolescents. Youth’s use of digital media creates tensions between traditions and expectations of renewal within the school. The once-sharp divide between school and leisure time is eroding. How will the school as an institution relate to this comprehensive process of change known as the digital revolution? How can the school build a bridge between the world of youth and school material to enable students to learn in a new digital age? This endeavor is named polycontextual bridging in this book. What are the good examples of polycontextual bridging? What novel educational goals can be achieved by net-related activities when incorporated into the school, and how can out-of-school learning be successfully framed by educational purposes? These questions are addressed from different perspectives by several scholars in this book. The chapters in this volume offer the most thorough, up-to-date discussion on the challenges of technology use in school education. In tackling the critical issues created by technology, this book provides an important resource for student teachers, teachers, education scholars and those interested in a critical examination of digital expectations and experiences in school education.
This book is motivated by a pressing need to come to grips with the dilemmas caused by an apparent clash of learning cultures in the individual classroom, in the schools, in the education of teachers, and in the institutions of teacher education. The book is also a tribute to Gavriel Salomon and his research on the cognitive effects of media’s symbol systems, media and learning, and the design of cognitive tools and technology-afforded learning environments. The book also contains his masterpiece “It’s not just the tool, but the educational rationale that counts”. Further, three internationally recognized experts—Howard Gardner, David Perkins, and Daniel Bar-Tal—describe Salomon’s remarkable academic contributions.
This book is an attempt to explicate, illustrate, and critically examine the idea of polycontextual bridging between youth’s leisure cultures and school material to enable students to learn in a new digital age. The authors do not present a common front on the complex question of the proper use of information and communication technology in the school but instead present a diversity of arguments and viewpoints. The book is an attempt to raise questions and start a debate.