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Edited by Adam Izdebski and Michael Mulryan

Environment and Society in the Long Late Antiquity brings together scientific, archaeological and historical evidence on the interplay of social change and environmental phenomena at the end of Antiquity and the dawn of the Middle Ages, covering the period ca. 300-800 AD. It gives a new impetus to the study of the environmental history of this crucial period of transition between two major epochs in premodern history. The volume contains both systematic overviews of the previous scholarship and available data, as well as a number of interdisciplinary case studies. It covers a wide range of topics, including the histories of landscape, climate, disease and earthquakes, all intertwined with social, cultural, economic and political developments.

Contributors are Daniel Abel-Schaad , Francesca Alba-Sánchez, Flavio Anselmetti, José Antonio López-Sáez, Daniel Ariztegui, Brunhilda Brushulli, Yolanda Carrión Marco, Alexandra Chavarría, Petra Dark, Carmen Fernández Ochoa, Martin Finné, Asuunta Florenzano, Ralph Fyfe,Didier Galop, Benjamin Graham, John Haldon, Kyle Harper, Richard Hodges, Adam Izdebski, Katarina Kouli, Inga Labuhn, Tamara Lewit, Anna Maria Mercuri, Alessia Masi, Lucas McMahon, Lee Mordechai, Mario Morellón, Timothy Newfield, Almudena Orejas Saco del Valle, Leonor Peña-Chocarro, Sebastián Pérez-Díaz, Eleonora Regattieri, Stephen Rippon, Neil Roberts, Laura Sadori, Abigail Sargent, Gaia Sinopoli, Paolo Squatriti, Giovanni Stranieri, Raymond van Dam, Bernd Wagner, Mark Whittow, Penelope Wilson, Jessie Woodbridge.

Human Interaction with the Environment in the Red Sea

Selected Papers of Red Sea Project VI

Edited by Dionysius A. Agius, Emad Khalil, Eleanor Scerri and Alun Williams

This volume contains a selection of fourteen papers presented at the Red Sea VI conference held at Tabuk University, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia in 2013. It sheds light on many aspects related to the environmental and biological perspectives, history, archaeology and human culture of the Red Sea, opening the door to more interdisciplinary research in the region. It stimulates a new discourse on different human adaptations to, and interactions with, the environment.

With contributions by Andre Antunes, K. Christopher Beard, Ahmed Hussein, Emad Khalil, Solène Marion de Procé, Abdirachid Mohamed, Ania Kotarba-Morley, Sandra Olsen, Andrew Peacock, Eleanor Scerri, Pierre Schneider, Marijke Van Der Veen and Chiara Zazzaro.

Venice and Its Neighbors from the 8th to 11th Century

Through Renovation and Continuity

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Edited by Sauro Gelichi and Stefano Gasparri

Venice and Its Neighbors from the 8th to 11th Century offers an account of the formation and character of early Venice, drawing on archaeological evidence from Venice and related sites, and written sources. The volume covers topics including: Venice’s role within the Byzantine exarchate of Ravenna during the 7th century; its independence in the mid-8th century; and its position as a dominant European and Mediterranean power. The work also discusses the birth of neighbouring communities of the northern Adriatic zone relevant to the rise of Venice.
Contributors are Francesco Borri, Silvia Cadamuro, Alessandra Cianciosi, Elisa Corrò, Stefano Gasparri, Sauro Gelichi, Cecilia Moine, Annamaria Pazienza, Sandra Primon, and Chiara Provesi.

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Johann Christoph Bürgel

Edited by Fabian Käs

Das vorliegende Buch widmet sich den Lebensumständen und der Berufsethik der arabischen Ärzte des Mittelalters. Auf der Grundlage zahlreicher biographischer, protreptischer, deontologischer und isagogischer Schriften untersucht Bürgel verschiedenste Aspekte der medizinischen Ausbildung, der Berufsausübung und der Rolle von Ärzten in der islamischen Gesellschaft. Besonderes Augenmerk gilt dabei der Bewahrung und Weiterentwicklung der antiken griechischen Berufsethik. Ein weiterer Schwerpunkt liegt auf den Wechselbeziehungen zwischen wissenschaftlicher Medizin und islamischer Religion.

The present book investigates conditions of life and professional ethics of the Arab physicians in the Middle Ages. Based on a multitude of biographical, protreptic, deontological, and isagogic texts, Bürgel analyzes diverse aspects of medical education, professional conduct, and the role of doctors in Islamicate societies. Special attention is given to the survival and further development of ancient Greek professional ethics. Another focus is on the interrelations between scientific medicine and Islamic religion.



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Edited by John M. Steele

Astronomical and astrological knowledge circulated in many ways in the ancient world: in the form of written texts and through oral communication; by the conscious assimilation of sought-after knowledge and the unconscious absorption of ideas to which scholars were exposed.
The Circulation of Astronomical Knowledge in the Ancient World explores the ways in which astronomical knowledge circulated between different communities of scholars over time and space, and what was done with that knowledge when it was received. Examples are discussed from Mesopotamia, Egypt, the Greco-Roman world, India, and China.

The Star of Bethlehem and the Magi

Interdisciplinary Perspectives from Experts on the Ancient Near East, the Greco-Roman World, and Modern Astronomy

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Edited by George H. van Kooten and Peter Barthel

This book is the fruit of the first ever interdisciplinary international scientific conference on Matthew's story of the Star of Bethlehem and the Magi, held in 2014 at the University of Groningen, and attended by world-leading specialists in all relevant fields: modern astronomy, the ancient near-eastern and Greco-Roman worlds, the history of science, and religion. The scholarly discussions and the exchange of the interdisciplinary views proved to be immensely fruitful and resulted in the present book. Its twenty chapters describe the various aspects of The Star: the history of its interpretation, ancient near-eastern astronomy and astrology and the Magi, astrology in the Greco-Roman and the Jewish worlds, and the early Christian world – at a generally accessible level. An epilogue summarizes the fact-fiction balance of the most famous star which has ever shone.

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Konstantinos I. Arvanitakis

This work attempts a psychoanalytic listening to the ‘oral’ Homeric epics in an effort to extract, as it were, from the ancient text certain elements of psychoanalytic understanding that are of relevance to contemporary psychoanalysis. There is, in addition, a consideration of related philosophical and linguistic issues that are linked to the basic psychoanalytic concepts that emerge from such a listening.
The main themes treated rotate around the central axis of time as it is expressed in the Homeric epics. Thus, questions of transition, loss, mourning, tolerance, identity, metaphor and tragic fragmentation are addressed as they relate to the ancient text. The process of metabasis along contrasting psychic states of being is discussed as it provides the frame for the construction of the basic interval of time and of the flux of human identity.
Although psychoanalysis from its early beginnings has shown – largely owing to Freud’s positing the Oedipus complex as the nuclear conflict – a distinct interest in classical Antiquity, the area of the great Homeric Epics has been singularly neglected as a chosen focus of psychoanalytic attention. It is as if the Homeric Epics belonged to a prehistoric pre-oedipal world which, for a long time, was not the dominant concern of psychoanalysis. The merit of this book lies in the fact that it fills part of this lacuna in psychoanalytic studies.

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Edited by Karl A. E.. Enenkel and Paul J. Smith

This volume tries to map out the intriguing amalgam of the different, partly conflicting approaches that shaped early modern zoology. Early modern reading of the “Book of Nature” comprised, among others, the description of species in the literary tradition of antiquity, as well as empirical observations, vivisection, and modern eyewitness accounts; the “translation” of zoological species into visual art for devotion, prayer, and religious education, but also scientific and scholarly curiosity; theoretical, philosophical, and theological thinking regarding God’s creation, the Flood, and the generation of animals; new attempts with respect to nomenclature and taxonomy; the discovery of unknown species in the New World; impressive Wunderkammer collections, and the keeping of exotic animals in princely menageries. The volume demonstrates that theology and philology played a pivotal role in the complex formation of this new science.

Contributors include: Brian Ogilvie, Bernd Roling, Erik Jorink, Paul Smith, Sabine Kalff, Tamás Demeter, Amanda Herrin, Marrigje Rikken, Alexander Loose, Sophia Hendrikx, and Karl Enenkel.

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R. James Long

Complementing the growing list of editions and translations which have appeared in the series Aristoteles Semitico-Latinus, this is the first critical edition of Adam of Bockenfield’s commentary on the pseudo-Aristotelian treatise on plants. The leading Arts master at Oxford in the middle decades of the thirteenth century, Adam crafted a comprehensive and highly organized commentary, which enjoyed wide circulation on the continent. Professor Long’s introduction also explores the relationship between Adam’s commentary and the gloss that was the established classroom text at Oxford.