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Series:

Edited by Bernard Feltz, Marcus Missal and Andrew Cameron Sims

Neuroscientists often consider free will to be an illusion. Contrary to this hypothesis, the contributions to this volume show that recent developments in neuroscience can also support the existence of free will. Firstly, the possibility of intentional consciousness is studied. Secondly, Libet’s experiments are discussed from this new perspective. Thirdly, the relationship between free will, causality and language is analyzed. This approach suggests that language grants the human brain a possibility to articulate a meaningful personal life. Therefore, human beings can escape strict biological determinism.

How Language Informs Mathematics

Bridging Hegelian Dialectics and Marxian Models

Series:

Dirk Damsma

In How Language Informs Mathematics Dirk Damsma shows how Hegel’s and Marx’s systematic dialectical analysis of mathematical and economic language helps us understand the structure and nature of mathematical and capitalist systems. More importantly, Damsma shows how knowledge of the latter can inform model assumptions and help improve models.

His book provides a blueprint for an approach to economic model building that does away with arbitrarily chosen assumptions and is sensitive to the institutional structures of capitalism. In light of the failure of mainstream economics to understand systemic failures like the financial crisis and given the arbitrary character of most assumptions in mainstream models, such an approach is desperately needed.

Medical Glossaries in the Hebrew Tradition: Shem Tov Ben Isaac, Sefer Almansur

With a Supplement on the Romance and Latin Terminology

Series:

Gerrit Bos, Guido Mensching and Julia Zwink

The Sefer Almansur contains a pharmacopeia of about 250 medicinal ingredients with their Arabic names (in Hebrew characters), their Romance (Old Occitan) and occasionally Hebrew equivalents. The pharmacopeia, which describes the properties and therapeutical uses of simple drugs featured at the end of Book Three of the Sefer Almansur. This work was translated into Hebrew from the Arabic Kitāb al-Manṣūrī (written by al-Rāzī) by Shem Tov ben Isaac of Tortosa, who worked in Marseille in the 13th century.

Gerrit Bos, Guido Mensching and Julia Zwink supply a critical edition of the Hebrew text, an English translation and an analysis of the Romance and Latin terminology in Hebrew transcription. The authors show the pharmaceutical terminological innovation of Hebrew and of the vernacular, and give us proof of the important role of medieval Jews in preserving and transferring medical knowledge.

Series:

Edited by Gloria Corpas Pastor and Isabel Durán-Muñoz

Trends in E-Tools and Resources for Translators and Interpreters offers a collection of contributions from key players in the field of translation and interpreting that accurately outline some of the most cutting-edge technologies in this field that are available or under development at the moment in both professional and academic contexts.
Particularly, this volume provides a wide picture of the state of the art, looking not only at the world of technology for translators but also at the hitherto overlooked world of technology for interpreters. This volume is accessible and comprehensive enough to be of benefit to different categories of readers: scholars, professionals and trainees.

Contributors are: Pierrette Bouillon, Gloria Corpas Pastor, Hernani Costa, Isabel Durán-Muñoz, Claudio Fantinuoli, Johanna Gerlach, Joanna Gough, Asheesh Gulati, Veronique Hoste, Amélie Josselin, David Lewis, Lieve Macken, John Moran, Aurelie Picton, Emmanuel Planas, Éric Poirier, Victoria Porro, Celia Rico Pérez, Christian Saam, Pilar Sánchez-Gijón, Míriam Seghiri Domínguez, Violeta Seretan, Arda Tezcan, Olga Torres, and Anna Zaretskaya.

Arabic Type-Making in the Machine Age

The Influence of Technology on the Form of Arabic Type, 1908–1993

Series:

Titus Nemeth

Arabic is the third most widely used script in the world, and gave rise to one of the richest manuscript cultures of mankind. Its representation in type has engaged printers, engineers, businesses and designers since the 16th century, and today most digital devices render Arabic type. Yet the evolution of the printed form of Arabic, and its development from metal to pixels, has not been charted before. Arabic Type-Making in the Machine Age provides the first comprehensive account of this history using previously undocumented archival sources. In this richly illustrated volume, Titus Nemeth narrates the evolution of Arabic type under the influence of changing technologies from the perspective of a practitioner, combining historical research with applied design considerations.

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Edited by Luciano L'Abate and Laura Sweeney

Writing as a medium of professional help and healing in the various interventional tiers of self-help, education, promotion, prevention, and psychotherapy, and rehabilitation has expanded exponentially since the introduction of computers and the Internet in the last generation. This volume does three things. Firstly, it brings together research on different types of writing and distance writing that have been, or need to be, used by mental health professionals. Secondly, it critically evaluates the therapeutic effectiveness of these writing practices, such as automatic writing, programmed writing poetry therapy, diaries, expressive writing and more. And thirdly, in addition to evaluating the effectiveness of various writing practices, the volume will examine how research-based writing approaches will influence the delivery of mental health services now and in the future, including the implications of these approaches.

Series:

Oliver Wendt

This book provides readers with vast knowledge of practical applications, theoretical models, services and evidence-based solutions in the areas of assistive technology (AT) and augmentative and alternative communication (AAC). It aims to equip practicing clinicians, educators and students with the necessary background to use AT and AAC with their clients. This book also sheds light on the many different roles and functions of AT and AAC for a large variety of clinical populations, and suggests solutions the reader can implement immediately. Although a particular focus is set on communication disorders, described applications and resources also apply to individuals with developmental disabilities and sensory impairments. In addition to outlining most recent low and high technology, this book makes a particularly strong effort to teach general principles and guidelines for successful AT and AAC interventions regardless of what particular technology is used. This resource is a crucial addition to the bookshelf of any professional dealing with AT and/or AAC, including speech-language pathologists, special educators, occupational therapists, physical therapists, early intervention specialists, students in professional programs, users of AT or AAC, their families, and applied researchers. This is a must read for novices and seasoned professional alike.

Series:

Rajinder Koul

Augmentative and Alternative Communication for Adults with Aphasia is a text written for practising clinicians, undergraduate and graduate students, assistive technologists and other stakeholders who are interested in learning more about the communication needs and options for people with aphasia. Although there are several book chapters dedicated to aphasia in currently available textbooks in augmentative and alternative communication (AAC), this is the first book dedicated entirely to AAC and aphasia. The book aims to: Provide an overview of aphasia and various treatment approaches. Provide a comprehensive review of AAC intervention approaches for persons with aphasia. Evaluate the efficacy of AAC intervention approaches that use technology, such as speech generating devices, and non-technological AAC approaches as part of a treatment package. Examine the ways in which techniques and strategies can be applied to persons with aphasia. Better understand how both direct stakeholders (i.e., persons with aphasia) as well as indirect stakeholders (e.g., close and extended family members, friends, paid caregivers) feel about the effectiveness of AAC intervention in persons with aphasia.

Series:

Edited by Ahti-Veikko Pietarinen

This is the first book to collect research on game-theoretic tools in the analysis of language with particular reference to semantics and pragmatics. Games are significant, because they pertain equally to pragmatics and semantics of natural language. The book provides an overview of the variety of ways in which game theory is used in the analysis of linguistic meaning and shows how games arise in pragmatic as well as semantic investigations. The book is a balanced combination of philosophical, linguistic, logical and mathematical argumentation. The book has an introductory and a concluding chapter, written by the editor, to give a gentle introduction to the topics covered in the book and to provide wider conclusions and prospects arising from the individual essays.
The major topics covering the field of game theory and linguistic meaning included in the book are: language games, Wittgenstein evolutionary language games communication games, Grice games of partial information equilibrium semantics game-theoretic semantics logical modelling, and generalised quantifiers the semantics/pragmatics distinction. It includes international contributions from known leaders in the field. It is part of the Current Research in Semantics/Pragmatics Interface series.