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Edited by Tina (A.C.) Besley

Tina Besley has edited this collection which examines and critiques the ways that different countries, particularly Commonwealth and European states, assess the quality of educational research in publicly funded higher education institutions. Such assessment often ranks universities, departments and even individual academics, and plays an important role in determining the allocation of funding to support university research. Yet research is only one aspect of academic performance alongside teaching and service or administration components. The book focuses on the theoretical and practical issues that accompany the development of national and international systems of research assessment, particularly in the field of education. In our interconnected, globalised world, some of the ideas of assessment that have evolved in one country have almost inevitably travelled elsewhere especially the UK model. Consequently the book comprises an introduction, eighteen chapters that discuss the situation in ten countries, followed by a postscript. It gathers together an outstanding group of twenty-five prominent international scholars with expertise in the field of educational research and includes many with hands-on experience in the peer review process. The book is designed to appeal to a wide group of people involved as knowledge workers and knowledge managers—academics, students and policy makers - in higher education and interested in assessment and accountability mechanisms and processes.

Buying your Way into Heaven

Education and Corruption in International Perspective

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Edited by Stephen P. Heyneman

Education is commonly thought to be a haven for the young. No matter how unstable the polity, no matter how dismal the prospects for the economy, education investments are often treated as sacrosanct. This is one reason for the popularity of education as part of foreign aid. Who could object to providing more opportunity for young people to study? Recently however, it has been discovered that education systems can be as corrupt as other parts of government and the economy; and that values of fairness and impartiality, once thought to be universal characteristics of education systems, can be supplanted by the interests of specific individuals, families and ethnic groups. Education corruption has now been found in all regions of the world, but it manifests itself in different ways. How do these differ from one region to another? What should be done to minimize education corruption? And what should be done to protect universities and employers in areas situated where there is little corruption from the products of those parts of the world where education corruption is the norm. This book will explain the meaning of education corruption and how it works; it will provide illustrations from Asia, Africa, Southeastern Europe and the former Soviet Union, and it will propose actions and policies on the part of regional and international agencies to counter-act what is now likely to become a new and unexpected global crisis.

A Carpenter's Daughter

A Working-Class Woman in Higher Education

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Renny Christopher

A Carpenter’s Daughter is the story of the difficulties and rewards of the educational system for one who was not meant to go through it. The single most reliable predictor of whether someone will earn a BA is whether at least one of their parents has one-yet, today, there are an increasing number of first-generation college students. A Carpenter’s Daughter is both a memoir of the author’s experiences growing up, going to school, and becoming an academic and a thoughtful commentary on the meaning of class in American culture. By connecting her own story with ideas from scholarly works on class and identity, Christopher shows how her individual experiences reflect common struggles that people of working-class background face when their education, profession, income, and lifestyles change. This work reminds us forcefully that "moving up" isn't necessarily good and that changing one’s class isn't as simple as going to class or even becoming the teacher of the class.—Sherry Linkon, author of Teaching Working Class The work is stellar, merging the tangled and complex webs of social mobility through education in ways that leave lots of loose ends dangling just the way it should. No pretty bows adorning carefully wrapped packages here. No straight and narrow trajectory toward a mainstream version of success. Instead, readers will be pulled along by nuanced narratives portraying the warped nature of society’s construction of success and a careful crafting of the book in its entirety as a disjointed text presenting shards of a life that can never be visible in a tidied-up tale.—Stephanie Jones, University of Georgia

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Edited by Hans de Wit, Pawan Agarwal, Mohsen Elmahdy Said, Molatlhegi T. Sehoole and Muhammad Sirozi

Student mobility is the most important factor in the internationalization of higher education. In this book, existing assumptions will be questioned: that mobility is primarily South-North and North-North, and that South-South flows are rather marginal; that the economic rationale has become so dominant that there are nearly no other motives to be found anymore; and that the growing presence of national and international providers of higher education, and opportunities for distance education, reduce the need for international student mobility. The dynamics of international student circulation will be analyzed on the basis of four countries (Egypt, India, Indonesia and South Africa), which are perceived to be primarily on the sending side of student mobility, and Europe and the USA, which are perceived to be primarily but not exclusively on the receiving side. These case studies will be placed in the context of broader developments in the internationalization of higher education, and related to definitions, methodological issues and global data, as used by UNESCO, OECD and others. This study has been undertaken by five scholars from different parts of the world in the context of the 2005-2006 New Century Scholars Programme 'Higher Education in the Twenty- First Century', of the Fulbright Programme. The book will be of relevance for both researchers and practitioners on globalization and the internationalization of higher education.

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Peter Roberts and Michael A. Peters

This book addresses key developments in higher education and research policy over the past decade. The authors pay particular attention to policy changes in New Zealand following the formation of a Labour-Alliance coalition government in 1999. From 1999 to 2008, a version of ‘Third Way’ politics has been applied in the New Zealand context. A key government goal has been to advance New Zealand as a ‘knowledge society and economy’, and education at the tertiary level has been seen as crucial in achieving this. Neoliberalism, Higher Education and Research considers the relationship between neoliberalism and the Third Way, discusses international trends in knowledge capitalism, examines performance-based research funding, critiques the rhetoric of ‘quality’ and ‘relevance’ in recent higher education policy, and assesses possibilities for critical citizenship and intellectual life in the 21st century. Much can be learned from the New Zealand experience in reflecting on policy developments in other countries, and this book will be of interest to all who ponder the future of knowledge and education in a globalised world.

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Edited by Ray Land, Jan H.F. Meyer and Jan Smith

Threshold Concepts within the Disciplines brings together leading writers from various disciplines and national contexts in an important and readable volume for all those concerned with teaching and learning in higher education.
The foundational principle of threshold concepts is that there are, in each discipline, ‘conceptual gateways’ or ‘portals’ that must be negotiated to arrive at important new understandings. In crossing the portal, transformation occurs, both in knowledge and subjectivity. Such transformation involves troublesome knowledge, a key concern for contributors to this book, who identify threshold concepts in their own fields and suggest how to deal with them.
Part One extends and enhances the threshold concept framework, containing chapters that articulate its qualities, its links to other social theories of learning and other traditions in educational research.
Part Two encompasses the disciplinary heart of the book with contributions from a diversity of areas including computing, engineering, biology, design, modern languages, education and economics. In the many empirical case studies educators show how they have used the threshold concept framework to inform and evaluate their teaching contexts. Other chapters emphasise the equally important ‘being and becoming’ dimension of learning.
Part Three suggests pedagogic directions for those at the centre of the education project with contributions focusing on the socialisation of academics and their continuing quest to be effective teachers.
The book will be of interest to disciplinary teachers, educational researchers and educational developers. It also is of relevance to issues in quality assurance and professional accreditation.

The War Against the Professions

The Impact of Politics and Economics on the Idea of University

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Judith J. Slater, David M. Callejo Pérez and Stephen M. Fain

The modern American university has, for more than a century, been the frontier where those who aspired to social and economic advancement ventured. Initially, the guides for the aspirants were the professors, who having earned the trust of both the general public and practitioners, provided the necessary foundation for entry into the profession. It was understood that what took place in the academy was an introductory experience as all professions require some form of supervised practical experience prior to being admitted into the profession. Research done by members of the academy served as the primary source of knowledge advancing the professions. Finally, those who were engaged in these acts of knowledge production were actively involved establishing pre-professional curriculum, teaching and evaluation, and they were held in high regard for this work.
The final quarter of the twentieth-century marked a shift in the general attitude toward the professorate and the academy. Trust was replaced with accountability and the high regard once enjoyed was undermined by suspicion. The traditional model of the academy once seen as a community of scholars was replaced by a new corporate mind-set. Production became more important than inquiry. These shifts resulted in a university where students were trained in response to the needs of others who defined the frontier for them. This shift responds to the mitra of the day.

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Edited by Roger L. Geiger, Carol L. Colbeck, Roger L. Williams and Christian K. Anderson

Public research universities are an integral part of American society. They play the leading role in educating future leaders in agriculture, engineering, the arts and sciences, humanities, business, education, and other professions. Public research universities generate the new products, processes, inventions, discoveries, insights, and interpretations that advance the human condition. The dominant centers of higher education in many states, public research universities are increasingly looked upon as major engines of economic development. And, through outreach, they harness their human and intellectual capital to serve their sponsoring societies. Yet state investment in public higher education is faltering and the role of public higher education is an area of ongoing debate. This flagging support, along with the growing perception that higher education is a private benefit rather than a public good, has put public research universities at a crossroads. With chapters by leading scholars, this book tackles these challenging issues—on learning resources; on competition; on the public and private benefits of public research universities; and on how best to create an environment for engaged learning. It brings into one collection informed arguments on the key issues facing the American public research university and serves as a valuable resource to students, scholars, and policy makers who are concerned about the future of these national assets.

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Edited by Philip G. Altbach, Leslie A. Bozeman, Natia Janashia and Laura E. Rumbley

The field of higher education studies has expanded dramatically in recent years. This book provides a unique and comprehensive guide, including an inventory of 199 centers, programs, and institutes in the field, a essay analyzing the emergence and current status of higher education as an area of study, and a listing of 191 journals focusing on higher education. Together, these three resources constitute the more comprehensive overview of the field available anywhere. Philip G. Altbach’s essay ‘Research and training in higher education’ discusses the origins of the field, the central issues of concern in the research literature, and trends among centers and institutes focusing on higher education worldwide. The inventory, which constitutes most of the book, provides information on the centers and programs, including the names of staff members, focus of work, and relevant addresses and websites. The expansion in the number of journals in the field is illustrated in the journals listing, which provides information about editors, substantive focus, and addresses of journals throughout the world. This book is a unique resources and a benchmark for an emerging field.

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Edited by Nelly P. Stromquist

Globalization has profoundly affected the university. It has shaped what is being learned, the use of technologies in the classroom, the connectivity between professors and institutions nationally and worldwide, the conditions of academic work, the relationship between knowledge production and the market, and the lives and interactions of students and faculty.
This book concentrates on a key figure in university life: the professoriate. It probes its conditions in a comparative perspective, bringing to the fore research findings from six countries with different historical trajectories, social visions, and degrees of insertion in capitalist modes of production: Denmark, South Africa, Mexico, Brazil, Russia, and Peru. Through each national study, common issues emerge, yet their particular contextual natures point to distinct developments. The contribution of this book resides in the coherence of all six studies, focusing on the impacts of globalization and systematically linking the massification of higher education to the emergence of detached, vulnerable professionals who face increasingly weak employment conditions, limited possibilities for advancement and governance, and a diminished professional identity—but who are also benefiting from increased cross-national contacts and easier access to knowledge.
The book will appeal to several audiences. Graduate level students in courses of international development, globalization, gender studies, sociology of education, anthropology of education, and comparative higher education will find in the book’s content fertile terrain for reflection and discussion. Professionals in comparative and international education, higher education, and educational research in general will find comparative insights to widen their understanding of higher education in contemporary society. Policy-makers and advisors to government agencies will find lessons applicable to their own countries.