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An Azanian Trio

Three East African Arabic Historical Documents

Edited by James McL. Ritchie and Sigvard von Sicard

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The Manasseh Hill Country Survey Volume 5

The Middle Jordan Valley, from Wadi Fasael to Wadi ‘Aujah

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Adam Zertal Z"l and Shay Bar

The book presents the results of a complete detailed survey of the eastern region of Samaria, mainly the Middle Jordan Valley, within the territory of Israel/Palestine. It is Volume 5 of the Manasseh Hill Country Survey publications. This project, in progress since 1978, and covering 2500 sq. km, is a thorough, metre-by-metre mapping of the archaeological-historical area between the River Jordan and the Sharon Plain, and between Nahal 'Iron and the north-eastern point of the Dead Sea. This territory is one of the most important in the country from the Biblical and archaeological view; and the survey is a valuable tool for scholars of the Bible, archaeology, Near Eastern history and other aspects of the Holy Land.
This volume describes the area of the Jordan Valley between Wadi Fasael in the north and Wadi 'Aujah in the south. It is a fully revised and updated version of the Hebrew publication of 2012.
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Edited by Giorgos Papantoniou, Demetrios Michaelides and Maria Dikomitou - Eliadou

Edited by G. Papantoniou, D. Michaelides and M. Dikomitou-Eliadou, Hellenistic and Roman Terracottas is a collection of 29 chapters with an introduction presenting diverse and innovative approaches (archaeological, stylistic, iconographic, functional, contextual, digital, and physicochemical) in the study of ancient terracottas across the Mediterranean and the Near East, from the Hellenistic period to Late Antiquity. The 34 authors advocate collectively the significance of a holistic approach to the study of coroplastic art, which considers terracottas not simply as works of art but, most importantly, as integral components of ancient material culture. The volume will prove to be an invaluable companion to all those interested in ancient terracottas and their associated iconography and technology, as well as in ancient artefacts and classical archaeology in general.
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Excavations at Nuzi II

The Archives at Shilwateshub, Son of the King (1932)

Edited by R.H. Pfeiffer

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Excavations at Nuzi III

Old Akkadian, Sumerian, and Cappadocian Texts from Nuzi

Edited by T.J. Meek

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Excavations at Nuzi V, Part II

The Palace and Temple Archives

Edited by E.R. Lacheman

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Excavations at Nuzi VI

The Administrative Archives

Edited by E.R. Lacheman

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Excavations at Nuzi VII

Economic and Social Documents

Edited by E.R. Lacheman

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The Tomb of the Priests of Amun

Burial Assemblages in the Egyptian Museum of Florence Gate of the Priests Series Volume 1

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Edited by Rogério de Sousa

The Tomb of the Priests of Amun, also known as Bab el-Gasus, was uncovered in 1891 at Deir el-Bahari (Thebes). The site proved to be the largest undisturbed tomb ever found in Egypt, as there were found the intact burials of 153 individuals that lived under the 21st Dynasty (ca. 1069-945 BC). This outstanding find was subsequently divided in lots of antiquities and dispersed by 17 nations.


This volume presents the first comprehensive publication of the Italian Lot, kept in the Egyptian Museum of Florence. Besides the formal description of the objects, a critical assessment of the collection is provided regarding the reconstruction of the burial assemblages, the reuse of the burial equipment and the art historical examination of coffin decoration.
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A History of Water Engineering and Management in Yemen

Material Remains and Textual Foundations

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Ingrid Hehmeyer

In A History of Water Engineering and Management in Yemen, Ingrid Hehmeyer describes the three-way relationship between water, land, and humans from ancient to medieval and premodern times. As illustrated in case studies from four sites, individual ecosystems necessitated different engineering and management approaches in order to make good use of the scarce water resources for both irrigated agriculture and domestic consumption. Material remains and written sources provide the evidence for a comprehensive examination of continuity and change; technical and managerial struggles, failures, and successes; the question of technology transfer; the impact of the religion of Islam on water use and allocation; and people’s reactions in times of severe crisis.