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Form and Function in Greek Grammar

Linguistic Contributions to the Study of Greek Literature

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Albert Rijksbaron

Edited by Rutger J. Allan, Evert van Emde Boas and Luuk Huitink

Albert Rijksbaron is internationally known as one of the leading scholars of the Ancient Greek language, whose work has exerted a strong and lasting influence on the scholarly debate concerning many aspects of Greek linguistics. This volume brings together twenty of his papers, two of which have been translated into English and some which are not easily accessible elsewhere. The selection represents the full range of Rijksbaron’s research, including papers on central topics in Greek linguistics such as tense-aspect, mood, voice, particles, negation, the article, questions, discourse analysis, as well as on the views of ancient grammarians and modern commentators. As a whole, the volume shows how much linguistic analysis can contribute to our understanding of Greek literary texts.
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The Letters of Alciphron

A Unified Literary Work?

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Edited by Michèle Biraud and Arnaud Zucker

In ‘The Letters of Alciphron: A Unified Literary Work?’, Michèle Biraud and Arnaud Zucker have gathered a dozen international contributions about the collection of letters of Alciphron, hitherto mainly studied as part of the epistolary genre at the time of the Second Sophistic or as testimony of a nostalgia for the Athens of Menander's time. The aim is to show the unity of a literary project through studies on the careful arrangement of each book (overall organization, coherent reappropriation of a culture, innovations in generic hybridization) and various elements of cohesion between the four books. For this purpose, were used as tools codicological criticism, stylistic and rhetorical examination, analysis of prosody, study of thematic treatments, uses of onomastics.
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H.A.G. Houghton, C.M. Kreinecker, R.F MacLachlan and C.J Smith

The earliest Latin versions of the writings of the New Testament offer important insights into the oldest forms of the biblical text, the use of language in the ancient Church and the foundations from which Christian theology developed in the West. This volume presents a collation of Old Latin evidence for the four principal Pauline Epistles (Romans, 1 and 2 Corinthians and Galatians). The sources comprise twenty-six Vetus Latina manuscripts, ten commentaries written between the fourth and sixth centuries and four early testimonia collections. Their text differs in many ways from the standard Vulgate version. Created using innovative digital editing tools, this collation makes this valuable data available for the first time and is complemented by full electronic transcriptions online.
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Tenses in Vergil's Aeneid

Narrative Style and Structure

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Suzanne Maria Adema

The narrative style of the Aeneid suggests immediacy and involves the reader, while at the same time both narrator and reader know what the outcomes of the story will be. In ‘Tenses in Vergil’s Aeneid: Narrative Style and Structure’, Suzanne Adema investigates the role of the Latin tenses in this presentational style. Adema presents a framework to analyze and describe the use of tenses in Latin narrative texts from a linguistic and narratological point of view. The framework concerns the temporal relations between a narrator and the states of affairs in his story on the sentence level, discourse modes on the global text level and narrative progression on the level of narrative and descriptive sequences.
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Textual Strategies in Ancient War Narrative

Thermopylae, Cannae and Beyond

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Edited by Lidewij W. van Gils, Irene J.F. de Jong and Caroline H.M. Kroon

In this collected volume fourteen experts in the fields of Classics and Ancient History study the textual strategies used by Herodotus and Livy when recounting the disastrous battles at Thermopylae and Cannae. Literary, linguistic and historical approaches are used (often in combination) in order to enhance and enrich the interpretation of the accounts, which for obvious reasons confronted the authors with a special challenge. Chapters drawing a comparison with other battle narratives and with other genres help to establish genre-specific elements in ancient historiography, and draw attention to the particular techniques employed by Herodotus and Livy in their war narratives.
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Left-Dislocation in Latin

Topics and Syntax in Republican Texts

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Hilla Halla-Aho

In the construction known as left-dislocation, an element appears in a fronted position, before the clause to which it belongs, usually introducing the topic of the sentence. Based on a detailed analysis of syntax, information structure and pragmatic organization, this study explores how left-dislocation is used in republican Latin comedy, prose and inscriptions as a device to introduce topics or other pragmatically prominent elements. Taking into consideration especially relative clause syntax and constraints of each text type, Hilla Halla-aho shows that, in the context of early Latin syntax and the evolving standards of the written language, left-dislocation performs similar functions in dramatic dialogue, legal inscriptions and archaic prose.
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Ancient Greek Ekphrasis: Between Description and Narration

Five Linguistic and Narratological Case Studies

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Niels Koopman

In Ancient Greek Ekphrasis: Between Description and Narration Niels Koopman offers a thorough linguistic and narratological analysis of five canonical ancient Greek ekphraseis from the archaic to the Hellenistic period: Achilles’ shield in Homer’s Iliad (18.478-608), Heracles’ shield in pseudo-Hesiod’s Shield (139-320), the goatherd’s cup in Theocritus’ first Idyll (27-60), Jason’s cloak in Apollonius Rhodius’ Argonautica (1.721-68) and Europa’s basket in Moschus’ Europa (37-62). Ekphrasis, as the verbal representation of visual representation, is both text and image, which makes it a complex yet fascinating phenomenon. By investigating its descriptive and narrative properties, this study sheds light on the interplay between text and image at work in ekphrasis.
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Sara Chiarini

As the first extensive survey of the ancient Greek painters’ practice of writing nonsense on vases, The So-called Nonsense Inscriptions on Ancient Greek Vases by Sara Chiarini provides a systematic overview of the linguistic features of the phenomenon and discusses its forms and contexts of reception.
While the origins of the practice lie in the impaired literacy of the painters involved in it, the extent of the phenomenon suggests that, at some point, it became a true fashion within Attic vase painting. This raises the question of the forms of interaction with this epigraphic material. An open approach is adopted: “reading” attempts, riddles and puns inspired by nonsense inscriptions could happen in a variety of circumstances, including the symposium but not limited to it.
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Bart L.F. Kamphuis

In New Testament Conjectural Emendation in the Nineteenth Century Bart L.F. Kamphuis investigates the life and work of Jan Hendrik Holwerda (1805-1886), who should be seen as the father of the Dutch Movement of Conjectural Criticism. Through a close study of his correspondence, Kamphuis reconstructs Holwerda’s remarkable scholarly biography. He then positions his text-critical theory against the views of Lachmann, Tischendorf and Tregelles. Finally, Holwerda’s corpus of New Testament conjectures is analysed by means of a newly proposed classification, while specific conjectures are discussed in the context of the history of scholarship on the passages concerned.
This study not only significantly contributes to our understanding of the history of New Testament textual criticism, but also shows that several of Holwerda’s conjectures have lasting relevance.
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Acta Conventus Neo-Latini Vindobonensis

Proceedings of the Sixteenth International Congress of Neo-Latin Studies (Vienna 2015)

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Edited by Astrid Steiner-Weber and Franz Römer

Since 1971, the International Congress for Neo-Latin Studies has been organised every three years in various cities of Europe and North America. In August 2015, Vienna in Austria was the venue of the sixteenth Neo-Latin conference, held by the International Association for Neo-Latin Studies. The proceedings of the Vienna conference have been collected in this volume under the motto “ Contextus Neolatini – Neo-Latin in Local, Trans-Regional and Worldwide Contexts – Neulatein im lokalen, transregionalen und weltweiten Kontext”. Sixty-five individual and five plenary papers spanning the period from the Renaissance to the present offer a variety of themes covering a range of genres such as history, literature, philology, art history, and religion. The contributions will be of relevance not only for scholarly readers, but also for an interested non-professional audience.