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Maritime Cooperation in Semi-Enclosed Seas

Asian and European Experiences

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Edited by Zou Keyuan

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Pirjo Kleemola-Juntunen

The Åland Strait is a particularly important sea route connecting the Gulf of Bothnia with the Baltic Sea between Sweden and the Åland Islands. The Åland Strait is closely connected to the Åland Islands, which were demilitarised in the international legal treaty ending the Crimean War in the 1850s. Following World War I, the Åland Strait was also regulated by the 1921 Convention relating to the Non-fortification of and Neutralisation of the Åland Islands. This book is the first to examine passage rights in the Åland Strait according to the Law of the Sea and its long history in times of war and peace.
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Regulation on Navigation of Foreign Vessels

Asia-Pacific State Practice

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Edited by Ted L. McDorman, Keyuan Zou and Seokwoo Lee

Regulation on Navigation of Foreign Vessels: Asia-Pacific State Practice focuses on one of the most contentious and diverse subject areas of the international law of the sea: foreign vessel rights of navigation in national waters. Featuring contributions from leading scholars in the law of the sea, the book is organized in four parts in accordance with the geography of the Asia-Pacific region: Northeast Asia; Southeast Asia; North America; and Australasia. The volume examines the divergence and uniformity of state practice and legal cultures impacting the legislation concerning oceans and ocean activities.
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Baselines under the International Law of the Sea

Reports of the International Law Association Committee on Baselines under the International Law of the Sea

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Edited by Coalter G. Lathrop, J. Ashley Roach and Donald R. Rothwell

Baselines under the International Law of the Sea brings together two reports produced by the International Law Association (ILA) Committee on Baselines under the International Law of the Sea between 2008 – 2018. The Sofia Report (2012) is organized around the interpretation of Article 5 of the 1982 United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea (LOSC) concerning the normal baseline. The Sydney Report (2018) is organized around a common methodology in assessing Articles 7, 8, 10, 13, 14 and 47 of the LOSC concerning straight baselines, closing lines, and straight archipelagic baselines.
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Edited by Irini Papanicolopulu

In Gender and the Law of the Sea a distinguished group of law of the sea and feminist scholars critically engages with one of the oldest fields of international law. While the law of the sea has been traditionally portrayed as a technical, gender-neutral set of rules, of concern to States rather than humans, authors in this volume persuasively argue that critical feminist perspectives are needed to question the underlying assumptions of ostensibly gender-neutral norms. Coming at a time when the presence of women at sea is increasing, the volume forcefully and successfully argues that legal rules are relevant to ensure gender equality and the empowerment of women at sea, in an effort to render law for the oceans more inclusive.
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International Law and Sea Level Rise

Report of the International Law Association Committee on International Law and Sea Level Rise

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Edited by Davor Vidas, David Freestone and Jane McAdam

This book contains the final version of the 2018 Report of the International Law Association (ILA) Committee on International Law and Sea Level Rise, as well as the related ILA Resolutions 5/2018 and 6/2018, both as adopted by the ILA at its 78th Biennial Conference, held in Sydney, Australia, 19–24 August 2018. In Part I of the Report, key information about the establishment of the Committee, its mandate and its work so far is presented. Part II of the Report addresses key law of the sea issues through a study of possible impacts of sea level rise and their implications under international law regarding maritime limits lawfully determined by the coastal States, and the agreed or adjudicated maritime boundaries. Part III of the Report addresses international law provisions, principles and frameworks for the protection of persons displaced in the context of sea level rise.
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Edited by Photini Pazartzis and Panos Merkouris

In Permutations of Responsibility in International Law the concept of responsibility in international law is tackled from a multitude of angles. The various contributions, which emerged from the proceedings of the ILA Hellenic Branch Regional Conference (2012), examine both classical and modern issues relating to the nature of responsibility, both as responsibility for unlawful acts and liability for lawful acts, the multifariousness of actors whose actions (or omissions) may give rise to responsibility, and finally the plethora of responsibility-related issues that have emerged in different areas of international law, be it international law of the sea, trade and investment or human rights law.
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Clive R. Symmons

The issue of historic rights and historic waters has long been a problematic area in the law of the sea where even basic definitions have been vague and interchangeably used in the past. The first edition of this book was entitled Historic Waters in the Law of the Sea: A Modern Re-Appraisal, and concentrated, as the title implies, on the doctrine of historic waters. The title of this expanded new edition has been broadened to take account of the important clarifications as to the doctrine of historic maritime claims generally—particularly 'historic rights' in the narrow sense which fall short of sovereignty claims. These latter rights—¬such as they now are—are discussed in depth in the new text. This development has come about, of course, because of the Award of the Arbitral Tribunal in Philippines v. China in 2016. This decision has, for the first time in a judicial setting, rationalised the terminology in this area of the law of the sea; and, most importantly, has clarified the close interaction of historic rights with the Law of the Sea Convention. This new edition discusses the latter issue passim, showing that much of the former customary law doctrine has now been overridden by the Convention.
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Edited by Myron H. Nordquist, John Norton Moore and Ronán Long

In The Marine Environment and United Nations Sustainable Development Goal 14, leading marine experts assess the scope, achievements, and limitations of UNSDG 14 for the conservation and sustainable use of marine resources. Chapters discuss the challenges and gaps of ocean governance through five key sections: Conservation and Sustainable Use of Oceans and Their Resources; Biodiversity beyond National Jurisdiction; Status of Deep Seabed Minerals; Marine Pollution and Coastal Ecosystems; and Climate Change and the Oceans. This important book illustrates current challenges facing sustainable marine development and management, and provides necessary insights for a coherent path forward.