Open Access

Vedic Cosmology and Ethics

Selected Studies

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Henk W. Bodewitz

Edited by Dory H. Heilijgers, Jan E.M. Houben and Karel van Kooij

How did ‘Vedic man’ think about the destiny of man after death and related ethical issues? That heaven was the abode of the gods was undisputed, but was it also accessible to man in his pursuit of immortality? Was there a realm of the deceased or a hell? What terms were used to indicate these ‘yonder worlds’? What is their location in the cosmos and which cosmographic classifications are at the root of these concepts? The articles by Henk Bodewitz collected in this volume, published over a period of 45 years, between 1969 and 2013, deal with these issues on the basis of a systematic philological study of early Vedic texts, from the Ṛgveda to various Brāhmaṇas, Āraṇykas and Upaniṣads.
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Edited by Jongtae Lim and Francesca Bray

Science and Confucian Statecraft in East Asia explores science and technology as practiced in the governments of premodern China and Korea. Contrary to the stereotypical image of East Asian bureaucracy as a generally negative force having hindered free enquiries and scientific progress, this volume offers a more nuanced picture of how science and technology was deployed in the service of state governance in East Asia. Presenting richly documented cases of the major state-sponsored sciences, astronomy, medicine, gunpowder production, and hydraulics, this book illustrates how rulers’ and scholar-officials’ concern for efficient and legitimate governance shaped production, circulation, and application of natural knowledge and useful techniques. Contributors include: Francesca Bray, Christopher Cullen, Asaf Goldschmidt, Cho-ying Li, Jongtae Lim, Peter Lorge, Joong-Yang Moon, Kwon soo Park, Dongwon Shin, Pierre-Étienne Will
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Philosophical Horizons

Metaphysical Investigation in Chinese Philosophy

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Guorong Yang

Edited by Paul D'Ambrosio

Professor Yang Guorong is one of the foremost living philosophers in China, and is widely known for the development of his “concrete metaphysics.” In Philosophical Horizons Yang offers penetrating discussions of some of the most important issues in modern philosophy—especially those topics related to comparative and Chinese philosophy. Drawing freely and adroitly on Confucian, Daoist, and Buddhist texts, while staging a dialogue with Western thinkers such as from Kant and Hegel to Marx, Heidegger, and Wittgenstein, Yang shows how contemporary Chinese philosophy has adopted, localized, and critically developed Western ideas alongside traditional Chinese concepts.
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Edited by Reza Pourjavady

During its Qajar period (1210–1344/1795–1925), Iran witnessed some lively and significant philosophical discourse. Yet apart from studies devoted to individual figures such as Mullā Hādī Sabzawārī and Shaykh Aḥmad Aḥsāʾī, modern scholarship has paid little attention to the animated discussions and vibrant traditions of philosophy that continued in Iran during this period. The articles assembled in this book present an account of the life, works and philosophical challenges taken up by seven major philosophers of the Qajar period. As a collection, the articles convey the range and diversity of Qajar philosophical thinking. Besides indigenous thoughts, the book also deals with the reception of European philosophy in Iran at the time.
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Confucius and the Analects Revisited

New Perspectives on Composition, Dating, and Authorship

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Edited by Michael Hunter and Martin Kern

Edited by Michael Hunter and Martin Kern and featuring contributions by preeminent scholars of early China, Confucius and the Analects Revisited: New Perspectives on Composition, Dating, and Authorship critically examines the long-standing debates surrounding the history of the Analects, for two millennia considered the most authoritative source of the teachings of Confucius (551–479 BCE). Unlike most previous scholarship, it does not take the traditional view of the Analects’ origins as given. Instead, it explores the validity and the implications of recent revisionist critiques from historical, philosophical, and literary perspectives, and further draws on recently discovered ancient manuscripts and new technological advances in the Digital Humanities. As such, it opens up new ways for productive engagement with the text.
Contributors: Mark Csikszentmihalyi, Paul van Els, Robert Eno, Joachim Gentz, Paul R. Goldin, Michael Hunter, Martin Kern, Esther Klein, John Makeham, Matthias L. Richter.
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Das Nichts und das Sein

Buddhistische Wissenstheorien und Transzendentalphilosophie

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Edited by Helmut Girndt

Dreißig Jahre kollegialer Beziehung zwischen der Japanischen und der Internationalen Fichte Gesellschaft haben im Band 46 der Fichte Studien ihren Ausdruck gefunden, einer Sammlung von Aufsätzen auf der Grundlage transzendentaler Philosophie (Kants, Fichtes und Husserls) und klassischer Texte des Mahayana Buddhismus (und der japanischen Kyoto Schule). Ohne unvereinbare Unterschiede zwischen westlichem und östlichem Denken zu leugnen, finden sie ihre Grundlage in prä-reflexiver Erkenntnis.

Beitragende sind Kogaku Arifuko, Martin Bunte, Luis Fellipe Garcia, Lutz Geldsetzer, Helmut Girndt, Katsuki Hayashi, Saša Josifović, Michael Lewin, Hitoshi Minobe, Kunihiko Nagasawa, Akira Omine, Valentin Pluder, Raji C. Steineck, Johannes Stoffers und Fabian Völker.

Thirty years of friendly connections between the Japanese Fichte Association and the International Fichte Society have found expression in volume 46 of Fichte Studien. It contains a collection of comparative studies between European and Japanese philosophy centered on transcendental philosophy (of Kant, Fichte and Husserl) and classical Mahayana Buddhism (plus Japan´s Kyoto school). Without denying irreconcilable differences between western and eastern thinking these essays demonstrate that western as well as eastern thinking is based on the universal ground of pre-reflexive cognition.
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Edited by Bo Mou

From the constructive-engagement vantage point of doing philosophy of language comparatively, this anthology explores (1) how reflective elaboration of some distinct features of the Chinese language and of philosophically interesting resources concerning language in Chinese philosophy can contribute to our treatment of a range of issues in philosophy of language and (2) how relevant resources in contemporary philosophy of language can contribute to philosophical interpretations of reflectively interesting resources concerning the Chinese language and Chinese texts. The foregoing contributing fronts constitute two complementary sides of this project. This volume includes 12 contributing essays and 2 engagement-background essays which are organized into six parts on distinct issues. The anthology also includes the volume editor’s theme introduction on comparative philosophy of language and his engaging remarks for three parts.
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Ronald S. Green and Chanju Mun

Gyōnen’s Transmission of the Buddha Dharma in Three Countries is the first English translation of this work and a new assessment of it. Gyōnen (1240-1321) has been recognized for establishing a methodology for the study of Buddhism that would come to dominate Japan. The three countries Gyōnen considers are India, China and Japan. Ronald S. Green and Chanju Mun describe Gyōnen’s innovative doctrinal classification system ( panjiao) for the first time and compare it to other panjiao systems. They argue that Gyōnen’s arrangement and what he chose to exclude served political purposes in the Kamakura period, and thus engage current scholarship on the construction of Japanese Buddhism.
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Coping with the Future

Theories and Practices of Divination in East Asia

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Edited by Michael Lackner

Coping with the Future: Theories and Practices of Divination in East Asia offers insights into various techniques of divination, their evolution, and their assessment. The contributions cover the period from the earliest documents on East Asian mantic arts to their appearance in the present time.
The volume reflects the pervasive manifestations of divination in literature, religious and political life, and their relevance for society and individuals. Special emphasis is placed on cross-cultural influences and attempts to find theoretical foundations for divinatory practices. This edited volume is an initiative to study the phenomena of divination across East Asian cultures and beyond. It is also one of the first attempts to theorize divinatory practices through East Asian traditions.
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Confronting Capital and Empire

Rethinking Kyoto School Philosophy

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Edited by Viren Murthy, Fabian Schäfer and Max Ward

Confronting Capital and Empire inquires into the relationship between philosophy, politics and capitalism by rethinking Kyoto School philosophy in relation to history. The Kyoto School was an influential group of Japanese philosophers loosely related to Kyoto Imperial University’s philosophy department, including such diverse thinkers as Nishida Kitarō, Tanabe Hajime, Nakai Masakazu and Tosaka Jun.

Confronting Capital and Empire presents a new perspective on the Kyoto School by bringing the school into dialogue with Marx and the underlying questions of Marxist theory. The volume brings together essays that analyse Kyoto School thinkers through a Marxian and/or critical theoretical perspective, asking: in what ways did Kyoto School thinkers engage with their historical moment? What were the political possibilities immanent in their thought? And how does Kyoto School philosophy speak to the pressing historical and political questions of our own moment?