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Edited by Dirk Vanderbeke and Brett Cooke

The contributors to this volume share the assumption that popular narrative, when viewed with an evolutionary lens, offers us an incisive index into human nature. In theory, narrative art could take a near infinity of possible forms, but in actual practice particular motifs, plot patterns, stereotypical figures, and artistic devices persistently resurface, indicating specific predilections frequently at odds with actual living conditions. The papers explore various media and genres to gauge the impact of our evolutionary inheritance, in interdependence with the respective cultural environments, on our aesthetic appreciation. They also suggest that research into mass culture is indispensable for evolutionary criticism and that it may contribute to discussions of the prehistoric conditions that still influence modern preferences in popular narrative. Contributions by Dave Andrews, James Carneym Mathias Clasen, Brett Cooke, Tamas Dávid-Barrett, Tom Dolack, Kathryn Duncan, Isabel Behncke Izquierdo, Joe Keener, Alex C. Parrish, Todd K. Platts, Anna Rotkirch, Judith P. Saunders, Michelle Scalise Sugiyama, Dirk Vanderbeke, and Sophia Wege.
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Gerechtigkeit im späten Zarenreich

Ideen, Konzepte, Wahrnehmungen

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Anna Lenkewitz-Salminen

„Gerechtigkeit bildet einen zentralen Grundsatz des gesellschaftlichen Lebens überhaupt und ist aus der moralischen Reflexion sowie aus der normativen Gestaltung des menschlichen Zusammenlebens nicht wegzudenken.“ Weil dem so ist, haben sich Menschen schon immer und ohne, dass das Thema jemals an Aktualität eingebüßt hätte, mit der Frage beschäftigt, was Gerechtigkeit sei und wie sie sich verwirklichen lasse.
Das betrifft die Frage nach einem gerecht gestalteten menschlichen Zusammenleben ebenso wie die Frage nach einer angemessenen Verteilung von Gütern und Lasten, Rechten und Pflichten in einer Gesellschaft. Letzten Endes aber ist das Nachdenken über gerechte gesellschaftliche Verhältnisse unweigerlich verbunden mit der Frage nach der Gerechtigkeit von Machtverhältnissen und damit von Herrschaft.

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Lose Leute

Figuren, Schauplätze und Künste des Vaganten in der Frühen Neuzeit

Edited by Franz Fromholzer, Jörg Wesche and Julia Amslinger

Anhand von literarischen und historischen Textzeugen des 16. bis 18. Jahrhunderts beschreibt das Buch ›lose Leute‹ und ihre Künste jenseits der abwertenden Sammelkategorie des Vagabunden. Erstmals systematisch sichtbar gemacht wird auf diese Weise die kulturdynamische Bedeutung frühneuzeitlicher Mobilität.
›Lose Leute‹: Mit dieser Formel Harsdörffers unternimmt das Buch die (literar-)historische Bestandsaufnahme eines Gattungs- und Medienhorizonts des Vaganten, der sich von indizierenden Quellen (z. B. Liber vagatorum) über fiktionale Genres (z.B. Schelmenroman, Fastnachtspiel) bis zu ephemeren Textzeugen (z.B. Flugblatt, Theaterzettel) erstreckt. Im Mittelpunkt steht die Rekonstruktion zeitgenössischer Existenz- und Ausdrucksformen des Vaganten in Literatur, Musik und bildender Kunst. Auf diese Weise konturiert sich frühneuzeitliche Mobilität als neuer Forschungsgegenstand.
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Sociability Associations

A Literature Review

Robert A Stebbins

Friendly social relations during free time, referred to here as leisure-based sociability, constitute a prominent reward of participation in groups based on voluntary membership, consisting for this review mainly of amateurs, hobbyists, volunteers, and their associations. This benefit is analyzed according to two subtypes: sociable nonprofit associations and social clubs. The goal of this issue of the Voluntaristics Review is to examine the leisure component of these two subtypes as framed in the serious leisure perspective (SLP), put nonprofit sociability in organizational context, and then review the empirical literature bearing on it. Excluded are the studies and theoretic treatises approaching nonprofit groups from another angle (e.g., organizational structure, management issues, funding sources, governmental regulation, type of employment). Specifically, this review centers on the relevant publications listed in the SLP website bearing on amateurs, hobbyists, and career volunteers (the serious pursuits), casual leisure, and project-based interests. It includes several extensions of the theory and research on leisure-related aspects of aging and retirement, arts and science administration, library and information science, positive psychology, therapeutic recreation and disability studies, and tourism and event analysis. Compared with the specialties in leisure studies, the SLP casts by far the broadest theoretical and empirical net in that interdisciplinary field. The research reviewed shows that such talk—generically known as socializing—reflects one or more of 14 themes. In general, members find sociability in these clubs and associations in and around the core activities they pursue there and on which the two subtypes have formed. The studies reviewed, taken together, provide considerable validation of the proposition that leisure-based sociability is a prominent reward of participating in a multitude of volunteer groups. Leisure-based sociability is essentially micro-analytic, but when viewed through the lens of the SLP, it can be further understood using meso and macro levels of analysis.
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Aztec Religion and Art of Writing

Investigating Embodied Meaning, Indigenous Semiotics, and the Nahua Sense of Reality

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Isabel Laack

In her groundbreaking investigation from the perspective of the aesthetics of religion, Isabel Laack explores the religion and art of writing of the pre-Hispanic Aztecs of Mexico. Inspired by postcolonial approaches, she reveals Eurocentric biases in academic representations of Aztec cosmovision, ontology, epistemology, ritual, aesthetics, and the writing system to provide a powerful interpretation of the Nahua sense of reality.
Laack transcends the concept of “sacred scripture” traditionally employed in religions studies in order to reconstruct the Indigenous semiotic theory and to reveal how Aztec pictography can express complex aspects of embodied meaning. Her study offers an innovative approach to nonphonographic semiotic systems, as created in many world cultures, and expands our understanding of human recorded visual communication.
This book will be essential reading for scholars and readers interested in the history of religions, Mesoamerican studies, and the ancient civilizations of the Americas.

'This excellent book, written with intellectual courage and critical self-awareness, is a brilliant, multilayered thought experiment into the images and stories that made up the Nahua sense of reality as woven into their sensational ritual performances and colorful symbolic writing system.'
- Davíd Carrasco, Harvard University
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Ayse Ozge Kocak Hemmat

Acknowledgements Prologue Introduction 1 The Rationality of Turkish Modernity 1 Appropriating Rationality 2 Military Reforms and Intellectual Concerns 3 Scientistic Rationality 4 Rational Nationhood 2 Reason Demands Rational Novels Discourse on the Novel 3 Araba Sevdasi—a Novel of Bad Education and Civilized Monsters 1 Books and Follies: Bihruz Bey’s Misadventures in Reading 2 Between Divertissement and Travail—or, How to Approach the Novel 3 Çamlica Garden: Irrational Uses of Rational Spaces 4 Yaban: Inventing the Adversary in Irrational Provinces 1 Confronting the Peasant: Noble Savage or Beast? 2 Parade of Beasts against the Humanist 3 Object of an Idea, or the Truth of the Peasant 5 The Past as an Object: Orientalist Fantasies of Ahmet Hamdi Tanpinar 1 Objectifying the Past: Orientalist Aestheticization of Culture 2 Continuing a Tradition and Confining the Past 3 Where to Find Peace of Mind: Huzur as a Novel of Ottoman Fantasies  3.1 Between Nuran and Ihsan—Sacred Light and Secular Beneficence  3.2 Not an Odalisque from a Matisse Painting 4 Eliminating the Past and Resetting the Clocks in Saatleri Ayarlama Enstitüsü 6 Reason’s Quarrel with Totalizing Rationality in Oguz Atay 1 Reason versus Totalizing Rationality 2 Butchering and Philosophy: How Rationality Mutilates Reason 3 Pure Reason’s Union with Naïve Reason Epilogue Bibliography Index
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Disasters of War

Perceptions and Representations from 1914 to the Present

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Edited by Steffen Bruendel and Frank Estelmann

Generations after war and violence the experiences are engraved in memories and influence individual and collective attitudes toward political and social conflicts.
The contributions collected in this volume concentrate on the complex interrelationships between war and its perception and representation. They examine events and cultural testimonies related to World War I, its aftermath, as well as to other violent conflicts in the 20th century. The contributions interrogate the concept of nation, challenge the implications of modern warfare, and discuss political agencies in the media and the arts with regard to soldiers, veterans and war memorials. This volume focuses on how war and violence is culturally processed and reveals astonishing examples of the after effects from 1914 to the present.

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Arab-Jewish Literature

The Birth and Demise of the Arabic Short Story

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Reuven Snir

In Arab-Jewish Literature: The Birth and Demise of the Arabic Short Story, Reuven Snir offers an account of the emergence of the art of the Arabic short story among the Arabized Jews during the 1920s, especially in Iraq and Egypt, its development in the next two decades, until the emigration to Israel after 1948, and the efforts to continue the literary writing in Israeli society, the shift to Hebrew, and its current demise. The stories discussed in the book reflect the various stages of the development of Arab-Jewish identity during the twentieth century and are studied in the relevant updated theoretical and literary contexts. An anthology of sixteen translated stories is also included as an appendix to the book.
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Edited by Harri Veivo, Petra James and Dorota Walczak-Delanois

Beat Literature in Europe offers twelve in-depth analyses of how European authors and intellectuals on both sides of the Iron Curtain read, translated and appropriated American Beat literature. The chapters combine textual analysis with discussions on the role Beat had in popular music, art, and different subcultures.
The book participates in the transnational turn that has gained in importance during the past years in literary studies, looking at transatlantic connections through the eyes of European authors, artists and intellectuals, and showing how Beat became a cluster of texts, images, and discussions with global scope. At the same time, it provides vivid examples of how national literary fields in Europe evolved during the cold war era.

Contributors are: Thomas Antonic, Franca Bellarsi, Frida Forsgren, Santiago Rodriguez Guerrero-Strachan, József Havasréti, Tiit Hennoste, Benedikt Hjartarson, Petra James, Nuno Neves, Maria Nikopoulou, Harri Veivo, Dorota Walczak-Delanois, Gregory Watson.
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Edited by Elizabeth Millán Brusslan and Judith Norman

Early German Romanticism has long been acknowledged as a major literary movement, but only recently have scholars appreciated its philosophical significance as well. This collection of original essays showcases not only the philosophical achievements of early German Romantic writers such as Friedrich Schlegel and Novalis, but also the sophistication, contemporary relevance, and wide-ranging influence of their philosophical contributions. This volume will be of interest both to students looking for an introduction to romanticism as well as to scholars seeking to discover new facets of the movement – a romantic perspective on topics ranging from mathematics to mythology, from nature to literature and language. This volume bears testimony to the enduring and persistent modernity of early German Romantic philosophy.