Author: Jean Laight
Large numbers of teachers have left the profession because teaching has become so time-consuming due to excessive workload. With so many women teachers leaving the profession, the author examines why some women teachers were not only staying in the profession but also giving up their time and energy to engage in trade union activism as a form of resistance against the raft of policy changes which they believe to be the root cause for the exodus. Exploring Narratives of Women Teacher Trade Union Activists attempts to discover why they are so motivated.

Narrative analysis is employed as the methodology in conjunction with a life history interview approach. This volume cites the work of Zembylas and Foucault, focusing on emotion and affect in education, political and social justice, teacher identity, teachers’ self-formation, the emotional labour of teaching, resistance and power, which is rooted in the social theory of post-structuralism. The author explores the strained relationship between teachers and government and how teacher professionalism is being perceived as an act of resistance in itself.
A Review of Educational Research
Preparing Indonesian Youth: A Review of Educational Research offers insights into the challenges and prospects in preparing Indonesian youth for 21st century living. The chapters feature empirically-based case studies focusing on three aspects of education in Indonesia: teaching and teachers; school practices, programs, and innovations; and the social contexts of youth and education.

The case studies also represent different vantage points contributing to an enriched understanding of how larger social phenomenon—for example, education decentralisation in Indonesia (rural-urban and transnational) migration, international assessments, and the global feminist and women’s movement—impact and interact with enacted visions of preparing all youth educationally for work, as well as for meaningful participation in their respective communities and the Indonesian society at large.

Contributors are: Anindito Aditomo, Hasriadi Masalam, Juliana Murniati, Ahmad Bukhori Muslim, Wahyu Nurhayati, Shuki Osman, Margaretha Purwanti, Esti Rahayu, Ila Rosmilawati, Andrew Rosser, Widjajanti M. Santoso, Anne Suryani, Aries Sutantoputra, Novita W. Sutantoputri, Isabella Tirtowalujo, Nina Widyawati and David Wright.    
Challenges and Directions in a Multicultural World
This book intends to find a common path for diverse approaches meant to reach a better vision on the future of education, to adapt it to the most spectacular and rapid changes in the modern world. Remarkable education specialists bring their research into this volume that collects the best ideas and solutions presented in the 19th Biennial Conference of the International Study Association on Teachers and Teaching (Sibiu, Romania, July 2019). The 17 chapters of this book promote a hopeful vision on the future of education as proclaimed in the title: Education beyond Crisis: Challenges and Directions in a Multicultural World.

The volume focuses on three major ideas: defining directions for the future of teaching, challenges of the contemporary teaching context, and teaching in a multicultural world. The volume itself stands for the multicultural approach of education, as the contributors propose a unitary picture on education, in the contexts of national educative programs or inclusive education for the refugee children.

Well-known researchers answer important questions on the effectiveness of educational reforms and education policies in different countries. They take into account the student voice or the teachers' opinions in teaching and designing the new curriculum. The volume includes researches based on case studies, interviews, surveys, qualitative analysis, and original researching instruments. Readers will find here not only the vision of a multicultural world, but also valuable ideas on education in Austria, Brazil, Canada, Portugal, Germany, Greece, India, Italy, the Netherlands, Pakistan, Serbia, Spain, Singapore, Romania, Turkey, and the United States.

Contributors are: Christiana Deliewen Afrikaner, Laura Sara Agrati, Ana Flavia Souza Aquiar, Neelofar Ahmed, Douwe Beijaard, Terence Titus Chia, Cheryl J. Craig, Feyza Doyran, Estela Ene, Maria Assunção Flores, Maria Antonella Galanti, Paula Martín Gómez, Christos Govaris, Heng Jiang, Stavroula Kaldi, Ria George Kallumkal, Manpreet Kaur, Julia Köhler, Malathy Krishnasamy, Virginia Grazia Iris Magoga, Maria Ines Marcondes, Paulien C. Meijer, Juanjo Mena, Raluca Muresan, Ingeborg van der Neut, Ida E. Oosterheert, Darlene Ciuffetelli Parker, Loredana Perla, Cui Ping, Snežana Obradović-Ratković, Maria Luisa Garcia Rodriquez, Minodora Salcudean, Gonny Schellings, Antonis Smyrnaios, Sydney Sparks, Alexandra Stavrianoudaki, Vassiliki Tzika, Evgenia Vassilaki, Viviana Vinci, Kari-Lynn Winters, Vera E. Woloshyn, Tamara Zappaterra, and Gang Zhu.
The educational world is experiencing exciting yet tension-filled times. We all wish to strengthen and support creativity and creative teaching in schools. Yet recent debates with regards to what “creativity” means, and how it should be implemented, raise the need for more specific approaches. Write a Science Opera (WASO) is one such approach. WASO is a transdisciplinary, inquiry-based approach to teaching at the intersection of art and science in schools. It is all about creative teaching and teaching for creativity.

Inquiry-Based Learning: A Guidebook to Writing a Science Opera provides teachers with the reasons and advantages to introducing pupils of all ages to WASO. It provides step-by-step instructions for how to implement WASO in classrooms. WASO is challenging, but the rewards are powerful: In WASO, it is the pupils’ curiosity and creative imagination which develop their science and art curriculum.

Get ready for an exciting, creative journey…
Trauma affects the lives of many children who we teach in school. It effects the students, teachers who teach them, the administration, and the school community as it is part of the school environment and culture. Teachers and administrators have great potential to set up an environment and adopt an attitude that can help heal the trauma in the lives of their students.

Schools need to become trauma-informed to be able to provide for the growing number of refugee children who have experienced terrorism, crime, war, and abuse, to better help some Indigenous children who due to systemic racism and discriminatory policies have been traumatised and live daily with trauma, and the growing number of all children who have experienced various kinds of trauma during their life span. Trauma informed schools means that all students can feel safe enough to learn, succeed academically and thrive after having undergone a traumatic event.

Trauma Informed Teaching demonstrates how Play Art Narrative (PAN) can be instrumental in creating trauma informed schools. The authors provide play, art, and narrative techniques and activities that educators can use to safely work therapeutically with traumatised children and youth.
Displacement, relocation, dissociation: each of these terms elicits images of mass migration, homelessness, statelessness, or outsiderness of many kinds, too numerous to name. This book aims to create opportunities for scholars, practitioners, and silenced voices to share theories and stories of progressive and transgressive music pedagogies that challenge the ways music educators and learners think about and practice their arts relative to displacement.
Displacement is defined as encompassing all those who have been forced away from their locations by political, social, economic, climate, and resource change, injustice, and insecurity. This includes:

- refugees and internally displaced persons;
- forced migrants;
- indigenous communities who have been forced off their traditional lands;
- people who have fled homes because of their gender identity and sexual orientation;
- imprisoned individuals;
- persons who seek refuge for reasons of domestic and social violence;
- homeless persons and others who live in transient spaces;
- the disabled, who are relocated involuntarily; and
- the culturally dispossessed, whose languages and heritage have been taken away from them.

In the context of the first ever book on displacement and music education, the authors connect displacement to what music might become to those peoples who find themselves between spaces, parted from the familiar and the familial. Through, in, and because of a variety of musical participations, they contend that displaced peoples might find comfort, inclusion, and welcome of some kinds either in making new music or remembering and reconfiguring past musical experiences.

Contributors are: #4459, Efi Averof Michailidou, Kat Bawden, Rachel Beckles Willson, Marie Bejstam, Rhoda Bernard, Michele Cantoni, Mary L. Cohen, Wayland “X” Coleman, Samantha Dieckmann, Irene (Peace) Ebhohon, Con Fullam, Erin Guinup, Micah Hendler, Hala Jaber, Shaylene Johnson, Arsène Kapikian, Tou SaiKo Lee, Sarah Mandie, David Nnadi, Marcia Ostashewski, Ulrike Präger, Q, Kate Richards Geller, Charlotte Rider, Matt Sakakeeny, Tim Seelig, Katherine Seybert, Brian Sullivan, Mathilde Vittu, Derrick Washington, Henriette Weber, Mai Yang Xiong, Keng Chris Yang, and Nelli Yurina.
Theory, Research, and Good Practice in Pre-service Teacher and Higher Education
Editor: Thomas Lehmann
Interest in knowledge integration grew considerably in recent years, particularly within the realm of pre-service teacher education. However, studies on the topic conceptualize knowledge integration in diverse ways. For example, it may be conceived as a specific coherence-building learning process which involves not only acquiring but interrelating knowledge of different types (e.g., theoretical and practical) or from different domains, which together constitute a teacher’s or educational specialist’s professional knowledge base (e.g., content knowledge, pedagogical knowledge, pedagogical content knowledge, knowledge about using technologies for learning and instruction, etc.). Furthermore, knowledge integration also refers to the meaningful application of knowledge of different types and from various domains in order to act professionally and to teach successfully.

In many countries, however, future teachers and educational specialists often struggle with knowledge integration, because the task of integrating knowledge across domains, from various courses, and from practical training is left largely to the individuals. Thus, the efficacy and quality of higher education programs, particularly in pre-service teacher education, could be improved through careful attention to knowledge integration.

International Perspectives on Knowledge Integration aims at facilitating the consideration of knowledge integration in teacher training and higher education in both research and practice. Specifically, it explores theoretical conceptions and methods, and reports on original research and good practices for fostering knowledge integration. It is thus of interest to researchers, faculty board members, and lecturers concerned with teacher training and higher education, as well as to student-teachers and students of pedagogy, education, and educational psychology.
A Guidebook for Teaching and Engaging with Critical Whiteness Studies
Author: Jennifer Beech
Despite hopeful—though problematic—proclamations about the end of racism after the election of our first African-American President, we are witnessing a backlash and renewed racism at this point in American and global history. Put simply, Critical Whiteness Studies (CWS) has as much exigency now as ever. Critical Whiteness Studies is an interdisciplinary project—with scholars from legal studies, literature and rhetorical studies, film and visual studies, class and feminist theorists, etc.—that contributes to critical race theory. Scholars tend to posit whiteness as an ideological, political, legal, and social fiction that places so-called whites in a position of hegemony over other non-dominant groups. The project, then, functions to unmask and interrogate these fictions. As part of critical multi-cultural and race theory, the project is anti-oppressive.

Those new to CWS are often unfamiliar with much of the court cases referenced and the critical terminology used by scholars in the field. As such White Out: A Guidebook for Teaching and Engaging with Critical Whiteness Studies is designed to orient readers to the history and purpose of CWS, to key concepts and legal cases, and to established and newer texts and resources. For educators wishing to include CWS in their workshops or courses, this guidebook also includes pedagogical resources ranging a sample syllabus to sample assignments and student texts to advice for structuring a dialogic workshop or classroom.

Student contributors are: Thomas Drake Farmer, Daniel Giraldo, Abby Graves, Elaine Ruby Gunn, Faith Jones, and Connor McPherson.
In Contextual Intelligence in School Leadership the author presents a new leadership construct suitable for the 21st century context of school improvement. He presents school leadership from contextual intelligence perspective as a function of various elements, which interact within the leadership they shape and the context in which such leadership is exercised to exert influence on the core areas of practice, including student learning, teacher development and school-community engagement. The construct represents a departure from the contemporary leadership theories, which place emphasis on separate elements of leadership and inadvertently create a problem of disintegration that does not bode well for sustainable school improvement.
Recognizing the vast numbers of old and young people alike that interact, socialize, and learn through gameplay, this book explores research approaches to games, their literacies, and the pedagogical possibilities of play. Consequentially, this volume is rooted in the idea that powerful forms of learning, communication, and multimodal production occur through and because of gaming. These profound literacy practices can mirror traditional literacies but the educational field’s approach to engaging in a pedagogy of playful literacies has been largely scattershot. By bringing together diverse voices, contexts, and research designs, the chapters in this volume present a snapshot of 21st century literacy practices at work and at play.

Organized into two parts, Studying Gaming Literacies explores the rich methodological approaches to gaming literacies scholarship as well as the possibilities of engaging in research in both classrooms and informal learning settings. With a robust set of context-specific approaches, this book acts less as a how-to manual for equity-driven scholarship than as a companion to support and undergird other research and pedagogical approaches to play and gaming in literacy-rich learning environments.

Focused on presenting scholarly approaches to gaming research, this volume, too, presents pedagogical takeaways for educators, for students, and for game designers and curators. Across the seven case studies presented in this volume, we call for intentional playful practices in educational research. The literacies of play are myriad and complex and – particularly in the name of educational equity – they demand to be studied, uplifted, and leveraged for academic achievement.

Contributors are: Jolynn Asato, Ali Carr-Chellman, Sebastián Castaño, Laura D’Aveta, Jennifer S. Dail, Jason Engerman, James Paul Gee, Robert Hein, Michael Hernandez, Ellen Middaugh, Raúl Alberto Mora , Shannon Mortimore-Smith, Tyrone Steven Orrego, Daniel Ramírez, Nate Turcotte, Shelbie Witte, and Jennifer Wyld.