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This book discusses the “long fifteenth century” in Iberian history, between the 1391 pogroms and the forced conversions of Aragonese Muslims in 1526, a period characterized by persecutions, conversions and social violence, on the one hand, and cultural exchange, on the other. It was a historical moment of unstable religious ideas and identities, before the rigid turn taken by Spanish Catholicism by the middle of the sixteenth century; a period in which the physical and symbolic borders separating the three religions were transformed and redefined but still remained extraordinarily porous. The collection argues that the aggressive tone of many polemical texts has until now blinded historiography to the interconnected nature of social and cultural intimacy, above all in dialogue and cultural transfer in later medieval Iberia.
Contributors are Ana Echevarría, Gad Freudenthal, Mercedes García-Arenal, Maria Laura Giordano, Yonatan Glazer-Eytan, Eleazar Gutwirth, Felipe Pereda, Rosa M. Rodríguez Porto, Katarzyna K. Starczewska, John Tolan, Gerard Wiegers, and Yosi Yisraeli.
This extraordinary commentary by a late twelfth-century anonymous northern French exegete interprets the Song of Songs solely according to its plain meaning as a story of two young lovers and their developing relationship. The exegete pays attention to every detail of the text, offering many enlightening insights into its meaning, all the while expanding upon the “way of lovers” – the ways that young people in love go about their lovemaking. The French background of the exegete is made clear by numerous references to knights, coats of arms, weapons, chivalry, and of course, wine drinking. The edition is accompanied by an English translation and extensive introduction which analyzes the various linguistic, literary, and exegetical features of the text.
Les intellectuels juifs de Bagdad. Discours et allégeances (1908-1951) raconte l’histoire d’un groupe d’intellectuels juifs de langue arabe à Bagdad. Faisant usage de sources historiques, Aline Schlaepfer examine les stratégies que ceux-ci mirent en place pour s’assurer une présence permanente dans la sphère publique en Irak. En analysant leurs discours et leurs allégeances, l'auteure montre qu’ils ne cessèrent jamais de s’exprimer publiquement sur les débats politiques les plus sensibles en Irak: nationalisme, communautarisme, colonialisme, nazisme et fascisme. Cet ouvrage suit leur parcours à travers une première moitié de XXe siècle irakien particulièrement agitée: la révolution jeune-turque de 1908, la création de l’Etat irakien (1920), plusieurs coups d’Etat (1936 et 1941), et la création de l’Etat d’Israël (1948), qui conduisit finalement à leur départ d’Irak en 1951.

In Les intellectuels juifs de Bagdad. Discours et allégeances (1908-1951), Aline Schlaepfer focuses on a group of Arabic-speaking Jewish intellectuals in Baghdad. Making use of historical materials, the author examines how strategies were negotiated by Jewish intellectuals in order to maintain a presence in the Iraqi public sphere. By analysing their discourses and allegiances, she shows that they continuously expressed their views on the most sensitive political debates in Iraq, such as nationalism, sectarianism, colonialism, Nazism and fascism. This work follows their trajectory during a turbulent period in Iraqi history; the 1908 Young-Turk Revolution, the creation of Iraq (1920), several coups d’état (1936 et 1941), and the creation of the State of Israel (1948), eventually leading to their departure from Iraq in 1951.

Contributors to The Divine Courtroom in Comparative Perspective treat one of the most pervasive religious metaphors, that of the divine courtroom, in both its historical and thematic senses. In order to shed light on the various manifestations of the divine courtroom, this volume consists of essays by scholars of the ancient Near East, Hebrew Bible, Second Temple Judaism, early Christianity, Talmud, Islam, medieval Judaism, and classical Greek literature. Contributions to the volume primarily center upon three related facets of the divine courtroom: the role of the divine courtroom in the earthly legal system; the divine courtroom as the site of historical justice; and the divine courtroom as the venue in which God is called to answer for his own unjust acts.
Space and Conversion in Global Perspective examines experiences of conversion as they intersect with physical location, mobility, and interiority. The volume’s innovative approach is global and encompasses multiple religious traditions. Conversion emerges as a powerful force in early modern globalization.

In thirteen essays, the book ranges from the urban settings of Granada and Cuzco to mission stations in Latin America and South India; from villages in Ottoman Palestine and Middle-Volga Russia to Italian hospitals and city squares; and from Atlantic slave ships to the inner life of a Muslim turned Jesuit. Drawing on extensive archival and iconographic materials, this collection invites scholars to rethink conversion in light of the spatial turn.

Contributors are: Paolo Aranha, Emanuele Colombo, Irene Fosi, Mercedes García-Arenal, Agnieszka Jagodzińska, Aliocha Maldavsky, Giuseppe Marcocci, Susana Bastos Mateus, Adriano Prosperi, Gabriela Ramos, Rocco Sacconaghi, Felicita Tramontana, Guillermo Wilde, and Oxana Zemtsova.