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Negotiating Ethnic Identity in the Past and Present
Author: Kevin Burrell
Cushites in the Hebrew Bible offers a reassessment of Cushite ethnographic representations in the biblical literature as a counterpoint to misconceptions about Africa and people of African descent which are largely a feature of the modern age.
Whereas current interpretations have tended to emphasize unfavourable portraits of the people biblical writers called Cushites, Kevin Burrell illuminates the biblical perspective through a comparative assessment of ancient and modern forms of identity construction. Past and present modes of defining difference betray both similarities and differences to ethnic representations in the Hebrew Bible, providing important contexts for understanding the biblical view. This book contributes to a clearer understanding of the theological, historical, and ethnic dynamics underpinning representations of Cushites in the Hebrew Bible.
Redefining the Empire with Forced Labor and New Imperialism
Forced convict labor provided the Portuguese with solutions to the growing criminal population at home and the lack of infrastructure in Angola and Mozambique. In Convict Labor in the Portuguese Empire, Timothy J. Coates examines the role of large numbers of convicts in Portuguese Africa from 1800 until 1932. This work examines the numbers, rationale, and realities of convict labor (largely) in Angola during this period, but Mozambique is a secondary area, as well as late colonial times in Brazil.

This is a unique, first study of an experiment in convict labor in Africa directed by a European power; it will be welcomed by scholars of Africa and New Imperialism, as well as those interested in law and labor.
Volume I: Prosecutor v. Brima, Kamara and Kanu (The AFRC Case)
The Special Court for Sierra Leone was established through signature of a bilateral treaty between the United Nations and the Government of Sierra Leone in early 2002, making it the third modern ad hoc international criminal tribunal. The tribunal has tried various persons, including former Liberian President Charles Ghankay Taylor, for allegedly bearing "greatest responsibility" for serious violations of international humanitarian law committed during the latter half of the Sierra Leonean armed conflict.

This volume, which consists of two books and a DVD and is edited by two legal experts on the Sierra Leone court, presents, for the first time in a single place, a comprehensive collection of all the interlocutory decisions and final trial and appeals judgments issued by the court in the case Prosecutor v. Brima, Kamara and Kanu. It contains the full text of all substantive judicial decisions, including the majority, separate and concurring as well as dissenting opinions. It additionally provides relevant information for a better understanding of the case, such as the indictments, a list of admitted exhibits and a list of documents on the case file.

The book, which is only the first in a series of edited law reports that will capture the entire jurisprudential legacy of the tribunal, fills the gap for a single and authoritative reference source of the tribunal’s jurisprudence. It is intended for national and international judges, lawyers, academics, students and other researchers as well as transitional justice practitioners in courts, tribunals and truth commissions as well as anyone seeking an accurate record of the trials conducted by the Special Court for Sierra Leone.

N.B.: The hardback copy of this title contains a DVD with documents. The e-book version does not.
The papers by international and Ethiopian scholars included in Human Rights and Development: Legal Perspectives from and for Ethiopia focus on the interconnectedness between the protection of human rights and the achievement of development. The book adds to the international debate by providing a unique insight into the Ethiopian perspective on the nexus between rights and development and by discussing how this nexus manifests itself in the Ethiopian context. The comparative and international frameworks and examples constitute a valuable resource for the debate on human rights and development in Ethiopia, which is currently taking place in the context of the developmental state approach pursued by the Ethiopian government.
Volume II: Prosecutor v. Norman, Fofana and Kondewa (The CDF Case)
The Special Court for Sierra Leone was established through signature of a bilateral treaty between the United Nations and the Government of Sierra Leone in early 2002, making it the third modern ad hoc international criminal tribunal. The tribunal has tried various persons, including former Liberian President Charles Ghankay Taylor, for allegedly bearing "greatest responsibility" for serious violations of international humanitarian law committed during the latter half of the Sierra Leonean armed conflict.

This volume, which consists of two books and a CD-ROM and is edited by two legal experts on the Sierra Leone court, presents, for the first time in a single place, a comprehensive collection of all the interlocutory decisions and final trial and appeals judgments issued by the court in the case
Prosecutor v. Norman, Fofana and Kondewa (The CDF Case).
It contains the full text of all substantive judicial decisions, including the majority, separate and concurring as well as dissenting opinions. It additionally provides relevant information for a better understanding of the case, such as the indictments, a list of admitted exhibits and a list of documents on the case file.

The book, which is the second in a series of edited law reports that will capture the entire jurisprudential legacy of the tribunal, fills the gap for a single and authoritative reference source of the tribunal’s jurisprudence. It is intended for national and international judges, lawyers, academics, students and other researchers as well as transitional justice practitioners in courts, tribunals and truth commissions as well as anyone seeking an accurate record of the trials conducted by the Special Court for Sierra Leone.

N.B.: The hardback copy of this title contains a CD-ROM with the scanned decisions that are reproduced in the book and the trial transcripts.
The e-book version does not.
Volume III: Prosecutor v. Charles Ghankay Taylor (The Taylor Case)
The Special Court for Sierra Leone was established through signature of a bilateral treaty between the United Nations and the Government of Sierra Leone in early 2002, making it the third modern ad hoc international criminal tribunal. The tribunal has tried various persons, including former Liberian President Charles Ghankay Taylor, for allegedly bearing "greatest responsibility" for serious violations of international humanitarian law committed during the latter half of the Sierra Leonean armed conflict. It completed its work in December 2013. A new Residual Special Court for Sierra Leone, based in Freetown and with offices in The Hague, has been created to carry out its essential “residual” functions.
This volume, which consists of three books and a CD-ROM and is edited by two legal experts on the Sierra Leone court, presents, for the first time in a single place, a comprehensive collection of all the interlocutory decisions and final trial and appeals judgments issued by the court in the case Prosecutor v. Charles Ghankay Taylor. The Taylor case is the jewel in the crown of the SCSL, as it was the first ever trial and conviction of a former African head of state for crimes committed in a neighboring state. It is also one of a handful of such significant cases in international criminal law.
The Taylor Law Report contains the full text of all substantive judicial decisions, including the majority, separate and concurring as well as dissenting opinions and probably the longest trial judgment ever issued by an international criminal court. It additionally provides relevant information for a better understanding of the case, such as the indictments, a list of admitted exhibits and a list of documents on the case file.
This book set, which is the third in a series of edited law reports that follows volume 1 (on Prosecutor v. Brima, Kamara and Kanu – the so-called “AFRC case” published in November 2012) and volume 2 ( Prosecutor v. Norman, Fofana and Kondewa – the “CDF case” published in March 2014) seeks to capture the entire jurisprudential legacy of the tribunal, fills the gap for a single and authoritative reference source of the tribunal’s jurisprudence. These law reports, the last volumes of which will be published in 2015 and 2016, are intended for national and international judges, lawyers, academics, students and other researchers as well as transitional justice practitioners in courts, tribunals and truth commissions as well as anyone seeking an accurate record of the trials conducted by the Special Court for Sierra Leone.

N.B.: The hardback copy of this title contains a CD-ROM with the scanned decisions that are reproduced in the book and the trial transcripts.
The e-book version does not.
Reflections from Southeast Asia and Africa
This book provides a detailed examination of how norms concerning human rights, civilian protection and prevention of mass atrocities have fared in the regions of Southeast Asia and Africa. Originated as a spin off of the journal GR2P (vol. 8/2-3, 2016), it has been enriched with new chapters and revised contents, which contrast the different experiences of those regions and investigates the expression of human protection norms in regional organisations and thematic policy agendas as well as the role of civil society mechanisms/processes. Hunt and Morada have brought together scholar-practitioners from across the world.The collection identifies a range of insights that provide rich opportunities for south-south exchange and mutual learning when it comes to promoting and building capacity for human protection at the regional level.
Author: Kamal-Deen Ali
In Maritime Security Cooperation in the Guinea: Prospects and Challenges, Kamal-Deen Ali provides ground-breaking analyses of the maritime security situation in the Gulf of Guinea and its implications for shipping, energy security, sustainable fisheries as well as national and regional security. The book juxtaposes the growing strategic importance of the Gulf of Guinea against the rising insecurity in the maritime domain, especially from piracy. Ali points out key gaps in prevailing regional and international approaches to maritime security cooperation in the Gulf of Guinea and sets out several suggestions for combating piracy as well as other maritime security threats while effectively enhancing maritime security cooperation in the region.
Institutional, Substantive and Comparative EU Aspects
East African Community Law provides a comprehensive and open-access text book on EAC law. Written by leading experts, including the president of the EACJ, national judges, academics and practitioners, it provides the most complete overview to date of this increasingly important field. Uniquely, the book also provides a systematic comparison with EU law. EU companion chapters provide concise overviews of EU law and its development, offering valuable inspiration for the application and further development of EAC law.

The book has been written for all practitioners, judges, civil servants, academics and students faced with questions of EAC law. It discusses institutional, substantive and jurisdictional issues, including the nature of EAC law, free movement and competition law as well as the reception of EAC law in Partner States.