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Volume Editor: John F. Lopez
This book presents a historical overview of colonial Mexico City and the important role it played in the creation of the early modern Hispanic world. Organized into five sections, an interdisciplinary and international team of twenty scholars scrutinize the nature and character of Mexico City through the study of its history and society, religious practices, institutions, arts, and scientific, cartographic, and environmental endeavors. The Companion ultimately shows how viceregal Mexico City had a deep sense of history, drawing from all that the ancient Americas, Europe, Asia, and Africa offered but where history, culture, and identity twisted and turned in extraordinary fashion to forge a new society.

Contributors are: Matthew Restall, Luis Fernando Granados, Joan C. Bristol, Sonya Lipsett-Rivera, Frances L. Ramos, Antonio Rubial García, Alejandro Cañeque, Cristina Cruz González, Iván Escamilla González, María del Pilar Martínez López-Cano, Enrique González González, Paula S. De Vos, Barbara E. Mundy, John F. López, Miruna Achim, Kelly Donahue-Wallace, Martha Lilia Tenorio, Jesús A. Ramos-Kitrell, Amy C. Hamman, and Stacie G. Widdifield.
Author: Rafael Bernabe
Walt Whitman and His Caribbean Interlocutors: José Martí, C.L.R. James, and Pedro Mir explores the writings of Whitman (1819-1892) and of three Caribbean authors who engaged with them: the Cuban poet, essayist and revolutionary José Martí (1853-1895); the Trinidadian activist, historian and cultural critic C.L.R. James (1901-1989), and the Dominican poet Pedro Mir (1913-2000). Whitman and his Caribbean interlocutors are discussed against the background of the contradictions of capitalist modernity, as exemplified by the United States between the 1840s and the 1940s. Marx's exploration of the liberating and oppressive dimensions of capitalist expansion frames the discussion of each author and of Martí's, James's and Mir's responses to Whitman and, more generally, to North American capitalist and industrial civilisation and its imperial projections.
Volume Editor: Francisco Bethencourt
This book explores the significance of gender in shaping the Portuguese-speaking world from the Middle Ages to the present. Sixteen scholars from disciplines including history, sociology, anthropology, linguistics, literature and cultural studies analyse different configurations and literary representations of women's rights and patriarchal constraints. Unstable constructions of masculinity, femininity, queer, homosexual, bisexual, and transgender identities and behaviours are placed in historical context. The volume pioneers in gendering the Portuguese expansion in Africa, Asia, and the New World and pays particular attention to an inclusive account of indigenous agencies.

Contributors are: Darlene Abreu-Ferreira, Vanda Anastácio, Francisco Bethencourt, Dorothée Boulanger, Rosa Maria dos Santos Capelão, Maria Judite Mário Chipenembe, Gily Coene, Philip J. Havik, Ben James, Anna M. Klobucka, Chia Longman, Amélia Polónia, Ana Maria S. A. Rodrigues, Isabel dos Guimarães Sá, Ana Cristina Santos, and João Paulo Silvestre.
Experimental forms in Argentina, 1955-1968
Author: Elize Mazadiego
Dematerialization and the Social Materiality of Art reconceptualizes mid-twentieth-century avant-garde practices in Argentina with a focus on the changing material status of the art object in relation to the country’s intense period of modernization. Elize Mazadiego presents Oscar Masotta’s notion of dematerialization as a concept for interpreting experimental art practices that negated the object’s primacy, while identifying their promise within the sociopolitical transformations of the 1950s and 1960s. She argues that, in abandoning the traditional art object, the avant-garde developed new materialities rooted in Buenos Aires’ changing social life. A critical examination of art’s materiality and its social role within Argentina, this important study paves the way for broader investigations of postwar Latin American art.