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Second Edition
Feminist Theory and Pop Culture (Second Edition) synthesizes feminist theory with modern portrayals of gender in media culture. This updated text provides comprehensive and interdisciplinary scholarship focused on topics related to:

– Historical examination of feminist theory.
– Application of feminist research methods.
– Feminist theoretical perspectives such as the male gaze, feminist standpoint theory, Black feminist thought, queer theory, masculinity theory, theories of feminist activism, and postfeminism.
– Contributor chapters cover a range of topics from Western perspectives on belly dance to television shows such as Girls, Scandal, and Orange is the New Black.
– Feminist theory and the wave of feminism, including a discussion of the fourth wave.
– Pedagogical features.
– Suggestions for further reading and discussion questions for classroom use.

Feminist Theory and Pop Culture was designed for classroom use and has been written with an eye toward engaging students in discussion. The book’s polished perspective on feminist theory juxtaposes popular culture with theoretical perspectives which have served as a foundation for the study of gender. This interdisciplinary text can serve as a primary or supplemental reading.
To consider gender and politics is to ask “Who has the power?” The Politics of Gender attempts to break through power structures by examining the institutional roles each play. This text takes several approaches to understanding the politics of gender, beginning with an introductory chapter focused on the major terms and theoretical approaches connected to political and gender studies.

Topics covered throughout the book include a historical discussion of the feminist movement, an analysis of the 2017 Women’s March on Washington, the nomination (and subsequent reactions) of Hillary Clinton, the impact Michelle Obama had for women of color as the first African-American First Lady, as well as the ways lesbian women’s bodies are scrutinized. In addition, this volume addresses the ways gender is litigated by examining the rights of lesbian women in Nigeria, the treatment of trans-gender people while in prison, and the connection between gun laws and intimate partner violence.

Finally, this text provides the reader with suggestions for community involvement, resources for voting, reading, film and Podcast recommendations, all combined with the stories of two women who discuss the change they created in their communities.
Movement toward Equity in Education
In Intersectionality of Race, Ethnicity, Class, and Gender in Teaching and Teacher Education, the editors bring together scholarship that employs an intersectionality approach to conditions that affect public school children, teachers, and teacher educators. Chapter authors use intersectionality to examine group identities not only for their differences and experiences of oppression, but also for differences within groups that contribute to conflicts among groups. This collection moves beyond single-dimension conceptions that undermines legal thinking, disciplinary knowledge, and social justice. Intersectionality in this collection helps complicate static notions of race, ethnicity, class, and gender in education. Hence, this book stands as an addition to research on educational equity in relation to institutional systems of power and privilege.
Indigenous Research Rising Up
Looking Back and Living Forward: Indigenous Research Rising Up brings together research from a diverse group of scholars from a variety of disciplines. The work shared in this book is done by and with Indigenous peoples, from across Canada and around the world. Together, the collaborators’ voices resonate with urgency and insights towards resistance and resurgence.

The various chapters address historical legacies, environmental concerns, community needs, wisdom teachings, legal issues, personal journeys, educational implications, and more. In these offerings, the contributors share the findings from their literature surveys, document analyses, community-based projects, self-studies, and work with knowledge keepers and elders. The scholarship draws on the teachings of the past, experiences of the present, and will undoubtedly inform research to come.
Borrowing from the ideas of John Dewey, schools and classrooms are a reflection of the world; therefore, in order to make sense of the urban classroom, we need to make sense of the world. In this book, the editors have compiled a collection of nine critical essays, or chapters, each examining a particular contemporary national and/or international event. The essays each undertake an explicit approach to naming oppression and addressing it in the context of urban schooling. Each essay has a two-fold purpose. The first purpose is to help readers see the world unveiled, through a more critical lens, and to problematize long held beliefs about urban classrooms, with regard to race, gender, social class, equity, and access. Second, as each author draws parallels between an event and urban classrooms, a better understanding of the microstructures that exist in urban classrooms emerges.
Education and the Male Violence of the West
"A valid contribution to the contemporary discussion of gender equality and sex differences. . . constitutes an important source of reflection in a changing world, in which confusion seems to be more the norm than actual freedom for all. "—As reviewed by Noga Sklar, in Times of Israel
Men have lower life expectancy than women; they account for 90% of the incarcerated population; they die more often in traffic accidents, from alcohol and drug consumption, and they commit more suicides than women. Since that information has been accessible for a long time, why is it not taken into account when campaigns are created and actions are defined? Violence is not an ‘entity’: it is male.
Confronted with that reality, the author sought to formulate the question orientating towards the following working hypothesis: this ‘common knowledge’should be forgotten, given that the involvement of men in situations of violence plays an important role in the preservation of political ideation in contemporary societies.
During this study it became clear that men are exposed to a more complex type of death than mere physical death, but just as important, which is relative to their social representation. This insight led to understanding other aspects that could be associated with men’s intense involvement in situations of violence. Could it be that in contemporary culture a purpose is served by keeping men involved with situations of violence? If so, what might that be?
Editor: Patricia Leavy
Winner of the 2018 USA Best Book Awards (Anthologies: Non-Fiction)!
Finalist in the categories Multi-Cultural Nonfiction and Education/Academic.

A contemporary alternative to the other texts on the market featuring original essays.
Contributors include Jean Kilbourne, Robin M. Boylorn, and Donna Y. Ford

Privilege Through the Looking-Glass is a collection of original essays that explore privilege and status characteristics in daily life. This collection seeks to make visible that which is often invisible. It seeks to sensitize us to things we have been taught not to see. Privilege, power, oppression, and domination operate in complex and insidious ways, impacting groups and individuals, and yet, these forces that affect our lives so deeply seem to at once operate in plain sight and lurk in the shadows, making them difficult to discern. Like water to a fish, environments are nearly impossible to perceive when we are immersed in them. This book attempts to expose our environments. With engaging and powerful writing, the contributors share their personal stories as a means of connecting the personal and the public.

This volume applies an intersectional perspective to explore how race, class, gender, sexuality, education, and ableness converge, creating the basis for privilege and oppression. Privilege Through the Looking-Glass encourages readers to engage in self and social reflection, and can be used in a range of courses in sociology, social work, communication, education, gender studies, and African American studies. Each chapter includes discussion questions and/or activities for further engagement.
An Interpretation of Social and Political Misogyny
Women between Submission and Freedom is a cultural, historical, and spiritual inquiry into the nature of contemporary Eastern and Western society which highlights the gender inequality plaguing contemporary Arabian culture. The author has witnessed first-hand the role of cultural influences in her religion and society. Her analysis begins with personal stories and everyday instances of misogynistic behavior suffered by herself and those around her.
The author delivers an important message about the deception and brainwashing of women in these communities. She bears witness to a culture which has taught women to be submissive and accept the fact that their societal value only exists in relation and deference to men. Whether through direct or indirect pressure, such communities reduce the innate human value of women, at the same time as the patriarchal system reduces them to virtual slavery. This systematic denigration includes not only the misogynistic mentality, but the historical suppression of women’s ideas and creations.
The author explores the portrayal of women in a range of religions that employ gender-based social intimidation under the cloak of religion. The interpretation of these verses is based on the societal values and politics of those who lead and protect the patriarchal system. To them, religion is not an ethos, but a weapon.
Latino Males, Schooling, and the Beautiful Struggle
When Pulitzer Prize nominated author Richard Rodriguez published his autobiography, Hunger of Memory: The Education of Richard Rodriguez in 1982, he received much criticism due to his views on issues such as assimilation, bilingual education, and affirmative action. Polemically, since Rodriguez’s publication, a book length revisiting of some of his ideas is for the most part non-existent.

Inspired by Rodriguez’s work, Barrio Nerds: Latino Males, Schooling, and the Beautiful Struggle presents a compelling window into the schooling trajectories of Latino males, while also providing critical and alternative views. These portraits of working-class students and academics that achieved academic success move beyond clean victory narratives and thus complicate our notions of “success” and “rising up.” Blending versus separating the exploration of street kid/school kid identities, we get a glimpse into the merging and collision of multiple cultural worlds in ways that are liberating and often painful and full of ambivalence. Additionally, we get provocative takes on giftedness, the philosophical and political dimensions of “home,” and masculinities.

Ultimately, Barrio Nerds: Latino Males, Schooling, and the Beautiful Struggle is a reminder of how academic achievement is often embedded in gain and in loss and it is a thoughtful meditation on how many Latino males of working-class origins do not reject the past, but instead use this precious knowledge to holistically live out the present.
Stories of Forced Migration of Dinka Women from South Sudan
Belonging is an issue that affects us all, but for those who have been displaced, unsettled or made ‘homeless’ by the increased movements associated with the contemporary globalising era, belonging is under constant challenge. Migration throws into question not only the belongings of those who physically migrate, but also, particularly in a postcolonial context, the belongings of those who are indigenous to and ‘settlers’ in countries of migration, subsequent generations born to migrants, and those who are left behind in countries of origin. Negotiating Belongings utilises narrative, ethnographic and autoethnographic approaches to explore the negotiations for belonging for six women from Dinka communities originating in southern Sudan. It explores belonging, particularly in relation to migration, through a consideration of belonging to nation-states, ethnic groups, community, family and kin. In exploring how the journeys towards desired belongings are haunted by various social processes such as colonisation, power, ‘race’ and gender, the author argues that negotiating belonging is a continual movement between being and becoming. The research utilises and demands different ways of listening to and really hearing the narratives of the women as embedded within non-Western epistemologies and ontologies. Through this it develops an understanding of the relational ontology, cieng, that governs the ways in which the women exist in the world. The women’s narratives alongside the author’s experience within the Dinka community provide particular ways to interrogate the intersections of being and becoming on the haunted journey to belonging. The relational ontology of cieng provides an additional way of understanding belonging, becoming and being as always relational.