Edited by Winfried Baumgart

Mit dieser Ausgabe ist die bewährte „Quellenkunde“ in einer grundlegend aktualisierten Fassung wieder greifbar. Das Werk verzeichnet die veröffentlichten Quellen größeren Umfangs zur deutschen Geschichte der Neuzeit von 1500 bis 2000. Die etwa 5.200 Titel werden bibliographisch genau erfasst und kommentiert. Erstmals sind Verweise auf digital verfügbare Quellen aufgenommen. Berücksichtigt sind selbstständige Dokumentationen (zeitgenössische Druckwerke oder spätere wissenschaftliche Akteneditionen) und auch monographische Traditionsquellen (wie Memoiren).

The French Nonprofit Sector

A Literature Review

Series:

Laura Nirello and Lionel Prouteau

This article deals with the literature on the French nonprofit sector (NPS). A preliminary part is devoted to presenting and discussing the characteristics that shape the approaches to this sector in France. We stress the strong influence of legal categories on the sector’s definition and, in this context, the importance of the status inherited from the 1901 Act on contracts of association. This raises a problem for a more analytical approach to the sector, because the diversity of the nonprofit organizations (NPOs) regulated under this Act risks being overshadowed. In this first part, we also underline the primacy accorded in France to the concept of the social economy, which has today become the social and solidarity economy (SSE), over that of the nonprofit sector.
In the second part, the article outlines some landmarks in the history of the French NPS. French NPOs were for many years objects of suspicion, arbitrariness and repression on the part of the public authorities and this persisted until the 1901 legislation on contracts of association was enacted. However, this hostile context did not prevent the sector from having a richer existence than is sometimes admitted.
This literature review also focuses on empirical studies of the sector, placing a particular emphasis on the more recent ones. These French studies basically adopt two types of approach. The first is concerned essentially with the NPOs and focuses its attention on their economic importance, whether measured in terms of financial resources, employment, or, less frequently, added value. The second approach investigates the kinds of individual participation the sector engenders by examining the various forms it takes, such as membership of NPOs or voluntary work.
This review ends with the analysis of the challenges that NPS faces in a context characterized by the increasing constraints on public funding, changes in the nature of such funding with a substitution of contracts for subsidies, an increased competition among NPOs as well as between NPOs and for-profit enterprises. The article concludes that, despite the advances in research on the French NPS, some aspects—like formal volunteering and the role of voluntary associations—are still understudied, while others—like informal groups and informal volunteering—are almost totally ignored.

Series:

Carl Brockelmann

The present English translation reproduces the original German of Carl Brockelmann’s Geschichte der Arabischen Litteratur (GAL) as accurately as possible. In the interest of user-friendliness the following emendations have been made in the translation: Personal names are written out in full, except b. for ibn; Brockelmann’s transliteration of Arabic has been adapted to comply with modern standards for English-language publications; modern English equivalents are given for place names, e.g. Damascus, Cairo, Jerusalem, etc.; several erroneous dates have been corrected, and the page references to the two German editions have been retained in the margin, except in the Supplement volumes, where new references to the first two English volumes have been inserted.

Das Erzählen in frühen Hochkulturen

II. Eine Archäologie der narrativen Sinnbildung

Series:

Edited by Hubert Roeder

Lost Books and Printing in London, 1557-1640

An Analysis of the Stationers' Company Register

Series:

Alexandra Hill

Lost Books and Printing in London, 1557-1640 is the first attempt to analyse systematically the entries relating to lost books in the Stationers’ Company Register. Books played a fundamental role in early modern society and are key sources for our comprehension of the political, religious, economic and cultural aspects of the age. Over time, the loss of these books has presented a significant barrier to our understanding of the past. The monopoly of the Stationers’ Company centralised book production in England to London with printing jobs carried out by members documented in a Register. Using modern digital approaches to bibliography, Alexandra Hill uses the Register to reclaim knowledge of the English book trade and print culture that would otherwise be lost.

Edited by Winfried Baumgart

Mit dieser Ausgabe ist die bewährte „Quellenkunde“ in einer grundlegend aktualisierten Fassung wieder greifbar. Das Werk verzeichnet die veröffentlichten Quellen größeren Umfangs zur deutschen Geschichte der Neuzeit von 1500 bis 2000. Die etwa 5.200 Titel werden bibliographisch genau erfasst und kommentiert. Erstmals sind Verweise auf digital verfügbare Quellen aufgenommen. Berücksichtigt sind selbstständige Dokumentationen (zeitgenössische Druckwerke oder spätere wissenschaftliche Akteneditionen) und auch monographische Traditionsquellen (wie Memoiren).

In the Name of the Battle against Piracy

Ideas and Practices in State Monopoly of Maritime Violence in Europe and Asia in the Period of Transition

Series:

Edited by Atsushi Ota

In the Name of the Battle against Piracy discusses antipiracy campaigns in Europe and Asia in the 16th-19th centuries. Nine contributors argue how important antipiracy campaigns were for the establishment of a (colonial) state, because piracy was a threat not only to maritime commerce, but also to its sovereignty.

'Battle against piracy' offered a good reason for a state to claim its authority as the sole protector of people, and to establish peace, order, and sovereignty. In fact, as the contributors explain, the story was not that simple, because states sometimes attempted to make economic and political use of piracy, while private interests were strongly involved in antipiracy politics. State formation processes were not clearly separated from non-state elements.

Contributors are: Kudo Akihito, Satsuma Shinsuke, Suzuki Hideaki, Lakshmi Sabramanian, Ota Atsushi, James Francis Warren, Fujita Tatsuo, Murakami Ei, and Toyooka Yasufumi.

Dress and Personal Appearance in Late Antiquity

The Clothing of the Middle and Lower Classes

Series:

Faith Pennick Morgan

This book examines the dress and personal appearance of members of the middle and lower classes in the eastern Mediterranean region during the 4th to 8th centuries. Written, art historical and archaeological evidence is assessed with a view to understanding the way that cloth and clothing was made, embellished, cared for and recycled during this period.
Beginning with an overview of current research on Roman dress, the book looks in detail at the use of apotropaic and amuletic symbols and devices on clothing before examining sewing and making methods, the textile industry and the second-hand clothing trade. The final chapter includes detailed information on the making and modelling of exact replicas based on extant garments.

Series:

Robert Edward Niebuhr

Titoist Yugoslavia is a particularly interesting setting to examine the integrity of the modern nation-state, especially the viability of distinctly multi-ethnic nation-building projects. Scholarly literature on the brutal civil wars that destroyed Yugoslavia during the 1990s emphasizes divisive nationalism and dysfunctional politics to explain why the state disintegrated. But the larger question remains unanswered—just how did Tito’s state function so successfully for the preceding forty-six years. In an attempt to understand better what united the stable, multi-ethnic, and globally important Yugoslavia that existed before 1991 Robert Niebuhr argues that we should pay special attention to the dynamic and robust foreign policy that helped shape the Cold War.

Slaving Zones

Cultural Identities, Ideologies, and Institutions in the Evolution of Global Slavery

Series:

Edited by Jeff Fynn-Paul and Damian Alan Pargas

In Slaving Zones: Cultural Identities, Ideologies, and Institutions in the Evolution of Global Slavery, fourteen authors—including both world-leading and emerging historians of slavery—engage with the ‘Slaving Zones’ theory. This theory has recently taken the field of Mediterranean slavery studies by storm, and the challenge posed by the editors was to see if the ‘Slaving Zones’ theory could be applied in the wider context of long-term global history.

The results of this experiment are promising. In the Introduction, Jeff Fynn-Paul points out over a dozen ways in which the contributors have added to the concept of ‘Slaving Zones’, helping to make it one of the more dynamic theories of global slavery since the advent of Orlando Patterson’s Slavery and Social Death.