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Edited by Maarten C.A. van der Sanden and Marc J. de Vries

Science & technology education on the one hand, and communication on the other, are, to a large extent, still separate worlds and many opportunities for synergy and cross-fertilisation are yet unused. This divide is unfortunate, since educators need communication skills and communicators often use aspects of education in their strategies. Moreover, innovation processes in both domains ask for education and communication insights and skills. Therefore, scholars and practitioners in both domains must seek connections and synergy by exchanging insights and ideas. This book discusses the shared aims of science & technology education and communication, such as science literacy and engagement, as well as common processes and challenges, such as social learning, social design and professionalisation, and assessment. Aims, processes, and challenges that inspire, enhance and deepen the education and communication synergy from a theoretical and practical side. If one reads the various chapters and reflects on them from one’s own perspective as a scholar or practitioner, the question is no longer if cross-fertilisation and synergy are needed, but when are we seriously going to take up this challenge together. This book aims to initiate the dialogue that the situation in the development of the topic requires at this point.

Studying Science Teacher Identity

Theoretical, Methodological and Empirical Explorations

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Edited by Lucy Avraamidou

The overarching goal of this book volume is to illuminate how research on science teacher identity has deepened and complicated our understanding of the role of identity in examining teacher learning and development.
The collective chapters, both theoretical and empirical, present an array of conceptual underpinnings that have been used to frame science teacher identity, document the various methodological approaches that researchers have implemented in order to study science teacher identity within various contexts, and offer empirical evidence about science teacher identity development.
The findings of the studies presented in this volume support the argument that teacher identity is a dynamic, multidimensional and comprehensive construct, which provides a powerful lens for studying science teacher learning and development for various reasons.
First, it pushes our boundaries by extending our definitions of science teacher learning and development as it proposes new ways of conceptualizing the processes of becoming a science teacher.
Second, it emphasizes the role of the context on science teacher learning and development and pays attention to the experiences that teachers have as members of various communities.
Third, it allows us to examine the impact of various sub-identities, personal histories, emotions, and social markers, such as ethnicity, race, and class, on science teachers’ identity development.
The book aims at making a unique and deeply critical contribution to notions around science teacher identity by proposing fresh theoretical perspectives, providing empirical evidence about identity development, offering a set of implications for science teacher preparation, and recommending directions for future research.

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Edited by Ruurd Taconis, Perry den Brok and Albert Pilot

Context-based science education has led to the transformation of science education in countries all over the world, with changes also visible in learning environments and how these are being shaped. These changes involve authentic problems on research and design, new types of interactions within communities of practice, new content areas and also new challenges for teachers in teaching, motivating, scaffolding and assessing their students, among other things.
This book focuses on context-based science education and its resulting changes in the perspective of research on learning environments. It also focuses on the implications for the teachers and the professional development of their competencies and beliefs.
The book consists of eleven chapters by experts in various themes surrounding learning environments research and science education, preceded by and concluded with a chapter with reflections on context-based learning environments in science by the editors of this book. The conclusion they draw is that professional development of science teachers may be the most important and the most difficult part of the process of teachers creating context-based learning environments in science, as is the focus in the title of this book.

Understanding Girls

Quantitative and Qualitative Research

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Dale Rose Baker

Understanding Girls: Quantitative and Qualitative Research is a retrospective of the author’s research that led to receiving the 2013 Distinguished Contributions Award to Science Education through Research. This book includes selected articles that document changes in her research approaches and theoretical frameworks. The articles represent the evolution of her thinking about the issue of girls in science as well as her impact on science education. The author’s work is placed in the context of science education research at the time of publication, research in education and psychology, and the culture of the times. She pulls back the curtain that often makes the messy work of research seem straightforward and linear to reveal why she did the research and the methodological decisions she faced. She describes the serendipitous nature of some of the work as well as her frustrations in trying to understand data, and struggles to insure that she accurately and respectfully presented the voices of girls and their teachers. The book also includes some of the earliest research in engineering education preceding the focus on engineering practices found in the Next Generation Science and Engineering Standards. Understanding Girls provides insights into why girls may or may not decide to participate in science and engineering and what can be done to increase their participation. It provides evidence that we have increased girls’ participation and the challenges that remain to insure that every girl who wants to become a scientist or engineer has the opportunity to do so.

What Can PISA 2012 Data Tell Us?

Performance and Challenges in Five Participating Southeast Asian Countries

Edited by Lei Mee Thien, Nordin Abd Razak, John P. Keeves and I Gusti Ngurah Darmawan

This is the first book regarding the issues of PISA that has been published with respect to the Southeast Asian region. It is hoped that the content of this book can benefit and provide greater understanding for readers of several important aspects: (a) country performance in PISA 2012 for each participating Southeast Asian country, (b) the need for international comparative studies from the perspective at all levels of the teaching and learning process, (c) equity and quality of education, (d) how PISA impacts on policy making, and (e) the initiatives and future directions, and challenges to improve PISA performance in the future cycles of the PISA Studies. The major issues raised in this book warrant investigation and reporting to all countries of the World, including not only those countries that were engaged in PISA 2012, but also to the approximately 200 countries that are currently in the United Nations Organisation.

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Edited by Carolyn J. Boulter, Michael J. Reiss and Dawn L. Sanders

Charles Darwin has been extensively analysed and written about as a scientist, Victorian, father and husband. However, this is the first book to present a carefully thought out pedagogical approach to learning that is centered on Darwin’s life and scientific practice. The ways in which Darwin developed his scientific ideas, and their far reaching effects, continue to challenge and provoke contemporary teachers and learners, inspiring them to consider both how scientists work and how individual humans ‘read nature’.
Darwin-inspired learning, as proposed in this international collection of essays, is an enquiry-based pedagogy, that takes the professional practice of Charles Darwin as its source. Without seeking to idealise the man, Darwin-inspired learning places importance on:

active learning
hands-on enquiry
critical thinking
creativity
argumentation
interdisciplinarity.

In an increasingly urbanised world, first-hand observations of living plants and animals are becoming rarer. Indeed, some commentators suggest that such encounters are under threat and children are living in a time of ‘nature-deficit’. Darwin-inspired learning, with its focus on close observation and hands-on enquiry, seeks to re-engage children and young people with the living world through critical and creative thinking modeled on Darwin’s life and science.

Edited by Neil Taylor, Frances Quinn and Chris Eames

Education for Sustainability is a key priority in today’s schools, as our society seeks to find a balance between environmental, social, cultural, political and economic imperatives that affect our future. As young children will become the next generation of adults, it is vital that they are educated about sustainability issues, so that they can learn to make informed decisions and take positive action for a sustainable world. Teachers are ideally placed to educate for sustainability issues, and indeed have a responsibility to do so. However, they often lack support and experience in this area, and constraints of current curriculum priorities can inhibit Education for Sustainability being taught effectively in many classrooms.
Educating for Sustainability in Primary Schools: Teaching for the Future addresses this problem by showing how Education for Sustainability can be developed within and across all areas of the primary curriculum in the Australian and New Zealand contexts. The book provides a range of educational approaches and examples of activities to support teachers in addressing national requirements for teaching the major primary curriculum learning areas, while simultaneously educating for sustainability. This integrative approach to primary education can promote knowledge of, positive attitudes towards and suitable action for sustainability in relevant, meaningful, enjoyable and creative ways. This book is a valuable resource for all primary teachers who wish to make a real difference to educating children for the future.

New Ground

Pushing the Boundaries of Studying Informal Learning in Science, Mathematics, and Technology

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Edited by Karen S. Sullenger and R. Steven Turner

Between 2004 and 2009, university educators, practicing scientists, museum and science-centre personnel, historians, and K-12 teachers in Canada’s eastern Atlantic provinces came together as a research community to investigate informal learning in science, technology, and mathematics. The interdisciplinary collaboration, known as CRYSTAL Atlantique, was sponsored by Canada’s National Science and Engineering Research Council. In this volume, the CRYSTAL participants look back on their collective experience and describe research projects that pushed the boundaries of informal teaching and learning. Those projects include encounters between students and practicing scientists in university laboratories and field studies; summer camps for science engagement; after-school science clubs for teachers and students; innovative software for computer assisted learning; environmental problem-solving in a comparative, international context; online communities devoted to solving mathematical problems; and explorations of ethonomathematics among Canadian aboriginal peoples. The editors and contributors stress the need for research on informal learning to be informed continuously by a notion of science as culture, and they analyze the forms of resistance that studies of informal learning frequently encounter. Above all, they urge a more central place for informal science learning in the larger agenda of educational research today.

Scientific Literacy for Participation

A Systemic Functional Approach to Analysis of School Science Discourses

Erik Knain

Scientific literacy is approached on the premise that language is key to understand the nature of both learning and participation, in scientists’ practices as well as in liberal education for citizenship. Some of the questions that are addressed in the book are:

• What does it take to be able to participate in different arenas in society involving science?
• How does everyday language relate to scientific language?
• How can students’ texts be analyzed to gain insights into their learning?
• How can images be analyzed alongside verbal language?

This book offers a thorough introduction to key ideas in M. A. K. Halliday’s systemic functional grammar through examples and practical analysis. Detailed analysis is offered of science textbooks and curriculum documents, classroom talk, experimental work, and students’ discussions of complex environmental issues. Further, an analytical model guiding the design and analysis of science learning discourses is introduced.
The book starts with introducing excerpts from whole-class discussions, group work, experimental reports and textbooks as text-in-context. From this starting point, key aspects of language are carefully explained. The role of grammatical metaphor in the development of science knowledge is an important topic throughout the book. Tools for analyzing multimodal representations, intertextuality and multiple voices are also among the topics covered for understanding and analyzing school science discourses.

Environment, Ethics and Cultures

Design and Technology Education's Contribution to Sustainable Global Futures

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Edited by Kay Stables and Steve Keirl

This collection engages environmental, ethical and cultural values perspectives to show how Design and Technology (D&T) Education actively contributes to the significant educational goal of attaining sustainable global futures.
An international collection of authors representing all levels of education articulate how D&T research, curriculum theory, policy, and classroom practices can synergise to contribute positively to the education of children for sustainable global futures. The book offers a spectrum of theorised curriculum positions, political and policy analysis, and case studies of successful school practice.
A key word in the title is that of contribution which is construed in several senses: first, of D&T as a vehicle for understanding the range of political and social values that arise with such a major educational challenge; second, of D&T as an agent of critical and practical action for students as global citizens; third, by taking global and multiple perspectives (rather than, say, Western or mono-cultural positions); and, fourth, by demonstrating D&T’s capacities for working in holistic and integrative cross-curricular ways.
The authors show how students can not only learn about their potential as humans-as-designers but can also develop designerly capacities that enable them to contribute meaningfully in practical ways to their communities and to wider society, that is, as global citizens who can apply design capability in ethical ways that are respectful of peoples, cultures and environments alike.