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In Private Associations and Jewish Communities in the Hellenistic and Roman Cities, Benedikt Eckhardt brings together a group of experts to investigate a problem of historical categorization. Traditionally, scholars have either presupposed that Jewish groups were “Greco-Roman Associations” like others or have treated them in isolation from other groups. Attempts to begin a cross-disciplinary dialogue about the presuppositions and ultimate aims of the respective approaches have shown that much preliminary work on categories is necessary. This book explores the methodological dividing lines, based on the common-sense assumption that different questions require different solutions. Re-introducing historical differentiation into a field that has been dominated by abstractions, it provides the debate with a new foundation. Case studies highlight the problems and advantages of different approaches.
In Monachus et sacerdos untersucht Christian Hornung die Asketisierung des Klerus im antiken Christentum. Analysiert werden theologische Begründungen der Asketisierung, ihre Einforderung in der kirchlichen Disziplin sowie die konkrete Umsetzung in der Pastoral. Ein eigenes Kapitel ist den Widerständen gegen die Durchsetzung der Asketisierung gewidmet.
Hornung kann überzeugend aufzeigen, dass die Asketisierung als ein umfassender Prozess einer zunehmenden asketischen Konzeptualisierung des Klerus zu deuten ist, der sich an die Professionalisierung in vorkonstantinischer Zeit anschließt und zu einer Ausdifferenzierung unterschiedlicher christlicher Lebensformen führt.

In Monachus et sacerdos Christian Hornung examines the asceticism of the clergy in late antique Christianity. The theological justifications of asceticism, its demand in ecclesiastical discipline and its concrete implementation in pastoral care are analysed. A separate chapter is devoted to resistances against the enforcement of asceticism in the clergy.
Hornung convincingly demonstrates that the asceticism is a broad process of increasing ascetic conceptualization of the clergy, which follows the professionalization in pre-Constantine time and leads to a differentiation of Christian life forms.
Brill’s Companion to Euripides offers 49 specially commissioned essays from leading international scholars which give critical examinations of the progress and direction of numerous wide-ranging debates about various aspects of Euripidean drama. Each chapter, as well as covering a wide diversity of thematic angles, provides readers with an authoritative and state-of-the-art survey of current thinking and research in a particular subject area. Recent advances in scholarship have raised new questions about Euripides and Attic drama, and have overturned some long-standing assumptions and canons. Besides presenting a comprehensive and authoritative guide to understanding Euripides and his masterworks, this companion provides scholars and students with compelling fresh perspectives upon a broad range of issues in the rapidly evolving field of Euripidean studies.
This book covers the political, diplomatic, and military history of the Aegean Greeks of the fourth century BC, raising new questions and delving into old disputes and controversies. It includes their power struggles, the Persian involvement in their affairs, and the ultimate Macedonian triumph over Greece. It deals with the political concept of federalism and its relations to the ideal of the polis. The volume concludes with the triumph of Macedonian monarchy over the polis.
In dealing with the great public issues of fourth-century Greece, the approach to them includes a combination of sources. The usual literary and archaeological information forms the essential foundation for the topographical examination of every major site mentioned in the text. Numismatic evidence likewise finds its place here.
Editor: Joseph Roisman
Many important issues surrounding Alexander the Great's conquest have captured the interest of scholars and general readers since antiquity. This book acquaints us with these issues and their current interpretations, and opens up new directions of investigation as it confronts them. It covers a broad range of topics: the ancients' representations of the king in literature and art; Alexander's relations with Greeks, Macedonians, and the peoples of Asia; the military, political, sociological, and cultural aspects of his campaigns; the exploitation of his story by ancient philosophers to argue a moral point and by modern communities to affirm or contest ethnic and national identities. This volume will be of interest to scholars and nonspecialists alike and serve as a standard reference work for years to come.
This volume on Thucydides, the most important historian of the ancient world, comprises articles by thirty leading international scholars.
The contributions cover a wide range of issues, including Thucydides’ life, intellectual milieu and predecessors, Thucydides and the act of writing, his rhetoric, historical method and narrative techniques, narrative unity in the History, the speeches, Thucydides’ reliability as a historian, and his legacy through the centuries. Other topics dealt with include warfare, religion, individuals, democracy and oligarchy, the invention of political science, Thucydides and Athens, Sparta, Macedonia/Thrace, Sicily/South Italy, Persia, and the Argives.
The volume aims to provide a survey of current trends in Thucydidean studies which will be of interest to all students of ancient history.

Brill's Companion to Thucydides was awarded Choice Outstanding Academic Title 2007 .
Editor: Lee Too
This volume examines the idea of ancient education in a series of essays which span the archaic period to late antiquity. It calls into question the idea that education in antiquity is a disinterested process, arguing that teaching and learning were activities that occurred in the context of society.
Education in Greek and Roman Antiquity brings together the scholarship of fourteen classicists who from their distinctive perspectives pluralize our understanding of what it meant to teach and learn in antiquity. These scholars together show that ancient education was a process of socialization that occurred through a variety of discourses and activities including poetry, rhetoric, law, philosophy, art and religion.
Culture, Image, Text
The politics, literature and culture of ancient Rome during the Flavian principate (69-96 ce) have recently been the subject of intense investigation. In this volume of new, specially commissioned studies, twenty-five scholars from five countries have combined to produce a critical survey of the period, which underscores and re-evaluates its foundational importance. Most of the authors are established international figures, but a feature of the volume is the presence of young, emerging scholars at the cutting edge of the discipline. The studies attend to a diversity of topics, including: the new political settlement, the role of the army, change and continuity in Rome’s social structures, cultural festivals, architecture, sculpture, religion, coinage, imperial discourse, epistemology and political control, rhetoric, philosophy, Greek intellectual life, drama, poetry, patronage, Flavian historians, amphitheatrical Rome. All Greek and Latin text is translated.
Roman literature is inherently political in the varied contexts of its production and the abiding concerns of its subject matter. This collection examines the strategies and techniques of political writing at Rome in a broad range of literature spanning almost two centuries, differing political systems, climates, and contexts. It applies a definition of politics that is more in keeping with modern critical approaches than has often been the case in studies of the political literature of classical antiquity. By applying a wide variety of critically informed viewpoints, this volume offers the reader not only a long view of the abiding techniques, strategies, and concerns of political expression at Rome but also many new perspectives on individual authors of the early empire and their republican precursors.
Brill’s Companion to Statius is the first companion volume to be published on arguably the most important Roman poet of the Flavian period. Thirty-four newly commissioned chapters from international experts provide a comprehensive overview of recent approaches to Statius, discuss the fundamental issues and themes of his poetry, and suggest new fruitful areas for research. All of his works are considered: the Thebaid, his longest extant epic; the Achilleid, his unfinished epic; and the Silvae, his collected short poetry. Particular themes explored include the social, cultural, and political issues surrounding his poetry; his controversial aesthetic; the influence of his predecessors upon his poetry; and the scholarly and literary reception of his poetry in subsequent ages to the present.