Browse results

You are looking at 61 - 70 of 152 items for :

  • Education Policy & Politics x
Clear All

Disrupting Higher Education Curriculum

Undoing Cognitive Damage

Series:

Edited by Michael Anthony Samuel, Rubby Dhunpath and Nyna Amin

“It has been a while since a scholarly book, so authoritative in its claims and innovative in its concepts, threatens to shake up the curriculum field at its foundations. Rich in metaphor and meaning, the superbly written chapters challenge a field that once more became moribund as we settled (sic) far too comfortably into accepting handed-down frames and fictions about knowledge, authority, power and agency that imprint ‘cognitive damage’ on those forced to the margins of schools and universities. Disrupting Higher Education Curriculum demonstrates, however, that it is in fact from those margins of the education enterprise that academics, teachers and learners can see more clearly how patterns of thought and action hold us back from placing and experiencing our African humanity at the centre of the curriculum.” —Jonathan Jansen, Rector and Vice Chancellor of the University of the Free State, South Africa

Educational Development in Western China

Towards Quality and Equity

Edited by John Chi-Kin Lee, Zeyuan Yu, Xianhan Huang and Edmond Hau-Fai Law

In 2000, the “Western Development” plan of the Chinese Mainland attracted attention of educators and policy makers. Around that period, the Chinese government also launched large scale and systemic curriculum reforms in basic education and secondary education in achieving quality education across the vast country. Despite significant progress that has been made in educational investments and attainments in China, issues of quality and regional disparities across China remain, especially in the less developed, western part of China where the significance of ethnic diversity, urban-rural disparity and variations in school development exists. In addition, there have been entrenched problems of teacher and teaching quality, resources inadequacy and ‘left-behind’ children. Written by a group of Chinese and international scholars, the book provides an updated analysis and discussion of educational development and related issues in the less developed part of Western China. These chapters cover broad contextual issues of educational development and reforms, issues of quality and equality in different sectors of education, as well as curriculum implementation, teaching innovations and professional development of teachers.

Series:

Edited by MacLeans A. Geo-JaJa and Suzanne Majhanovich

With its comprehensive coverage and quality this provocative book is concerned with the future of developing countries in Africa, Asia and Latin America. By providing in-depth analysis of the economic, social and educational challenges of emerging states it offers an alternative roadmap to development. The authors in this collection substantiate the notion that emerging states often do not participate in policy choices related to their development when faced with universalization of curriculum and internationalization of education. The authors make explicit the direct and indirect effects of globalization on educational systems, social equity, and the path of development. In demonstrating the impact of neoliberalism or market-based reforms on the developing world, the authors show that education without human rights is vulnerable to negative forces of globalization and internationalization. The message of the book is quite pessimistic about possibilities to widen the economic space or increase freedom, unless development cooperation is made possible by “Helping People Help Themselves” as suggested by David Ellerman. The authors note that in the past, the issue of emerging states as an appendage to the world economy was a fundamental question related to colonialism, but now has become a question of imperialism which needs to be examined when considering the current patterns of development.

Giftedness and Talent in the 21st Century

Adapting to the Turbulence of Globalization

Series:

Edited by Don Ambrose and Robert J. Sternberg

When today’s gifted and talented young people emerge into adulthood will they be able to overcome some enormous 21st-century problems that are pushing us toward large-scale socioeconomic devastation? Will they be able to capitalize on unprecedented opportunities that can lead to widespread prosperity and fulfillment? This book explores these questions while yielding insights from many of the world’s leading scholars of giftedness and talent development. Until now there has been inadequate understanding of 21st-century trends and issues that influence the gifted and talented. The book provides some clarity by establishing a big-picture, interdisciplinary overview of the socioeconomic, cultural, and technological pressures emerging from 21st-century globalization and describing some ways in which those pressures simultaneously suppress, distort, and invigorate the discovery of aspirations and the development of talents. Throughout the volume, prominent scholars of gifted education and talent development use their impressive knowledge bases to clarify how we can adjust our thoughts and actions in order to give ourselves the best possible chances for success in this complex world.

The Global and the Local

Diverse Perspectives in Comparative Education

Series:

Edited by M. Fernanda Astiz and Motoko Akiba

The book examines how the understanding of the global and the local has changed in response to ongoing reconfigurations between the state and society. It also emphasizes the importance of schooling as an institution both within and across national contexts, a holistic approach that helps us move beyond a conglomeration of isolated local events to pay attention to global trends. In this regard, the book underscores the richness of contextual factors that may create opportunities for innovation, or may serve as constraints in the implementation process. As a whole, the book brings new questions about globalization and the imperatives of education policy and implementation.

Series:

Edited by Ola Erstad, Kristiina Kumpulainen, Åsa Mäkitalo, Kim Christian Schrøder, Pille Pruulmann-Vengerfeldt and Thuridur Jóhannsdóttir

Developments within the “knowledge society,” especially those resulting from technological innovation, have intensified an interest in the relationship between different contexts and multiple sites of learning across what is often termed as formal, non-formal and informal learning environments. The aim of this book is to trace learning and experience across multiple sites and contexts as a means to generate new knowledge about the borders and edges of different practices and the boundary crossings these entail in the learning lives of young people in times of dynamic societal, environmental, economic, and technological change. The empirical research discussed in this book has grown out of a Nordic network of researchers. The research initiatives in the Nordic countries tend to avoid the more spectacular debates over the future of the educational institutions that tend to dominate and obscure discussions on education in the knowledge society, and which look to models of informal learning, whether in the “learning communities” of workplaces and families or in the new socio-technical spaces of the Internet, as a source of alternative educational strategies. Rather, Nordic researchers more modestly ask whether it is possible to envisage new models of teaching and learning which take seriously both the responsibility to social justice and social wellbeing, which, at least rhetorically, underpinned a commitment to mass education of the 20th century, as well as to the radical challenges to traditional educational models offered by the new socio-technical spaces and practices of the 21st century.

Series:

Edited by Ian R. Haslam and Myint Swe Khine

Much has been written of late about the need to reform school systems across the world. In like manner there have been many attempts to change school systems for the better but without a great deal of success. This, in part, has much to do with the inertia in school systems and the nature of the work. The professional isolation of teachers from one another in schools is no excuse but it is a key factor in the development of system wide professional capital. This book explores the importance of school leadership and the use of digital media to develop social capital in schools. Particular examples of school reforms that focused on developing professional capital with varying degrees of success are to be seen in the UAE, in reforms to the Australian middle school, and in attempts to reform the Community College in the USA.
Throughout the book there are three powerful ideas associated with successful large scale reforms. First, there are the structural elements that all successful school systems have in common including revised curriculum standards, a reliable assessment system, technical skills of teachers and school leaders, a comprehensive data system, rewards and remuneration of workforce and policy documents to support change. Second, strategic imperatives such as the singular focus on teaching and learning for student success, the need to build workforce capacity in schools, the need to ensure system wide implementation of reforms and the importance of collaboration and team building. Third, the systematic development of professional learning communities and teacher leadership will increase social capital in schools which will ensure student success. This book looks at overcoming the inertia to school reform in education systems caused by structural deficiencies, strategic shortfalls and implementation procedures.

Marginalisation and Aggression from Bullying to Genocide

Critical Educational and Psychological Perspectives

Series:

Stephen James Minton

In this book, the author proposes the existence of a continuum of aggressive marginalisation phenomena, ranging from the unfortunately commonplace experiences of prejudice, discrimination and bullying behaviour, through to genocide. Attempts made by researchers and practitioners to understand, counter and prevent bullying behaviour are reviewed. A key finding has been that the success that has been accrued has been limited, especially when the case of those who belong to so-called ‘minority’ groups (who are often the target of prejudice outside of the school gates) is considered; it is suggested that future anti-bullying actions should meaningfully engage with prejudice as an underlying factor. After a critical consideration of the various psychological understandings of aggression, aggressive behaviour and marginalisation has been made, the author goes on to introduce and assess an eight-stage model of physical genocide, based primarily on insights from social cognitive psychology, and exemplified in the history of the Lakota-Cheyenne Campaign (1864—1890). This is followed by a consideration of the cultural genocide levelled against indigenous peoples (exemplified in the Sami people in Norway, and indigenous peoples of North America), as implemented through the actions of educational systems and educators. The book ends with some suggestions being made regarding our potential to address the ‘One’ and ‘Other’ mindset that is proposed as underlying the continuum of aggressive marginalisation phenomena—through the psychological understandings that we can offer, the educational practice that we can provide, and in the conscious acts of the affirmation of humanity we can make in our individual and collective choices.

Edited by Rosalind M.O. Pritchard, Attila Pausits and James Williams

Higher education is of growing public and political importance for society and the economy. Globalisation is transforming it from a local and national concern into one of international significance. In order to fulfil societal, governmental and business sector needs, many universities are aiming to (re-)position themselves. The book initially considers their “compass”. They aspire to transformational planning, mission and strategy in which social justice is important, people are not treated as mere means to an end, and traditional moral positions are respected. This transformational urge is sometimes vitiated by blunt demands of new public management that overlook universities’ potential for serving the public good. The volume then addresses universities’success in meeting their targets. Often the challenge in evaluation is the need to reconcile tensions, for example between structure and pastoral care of students; institutional competition and collaboration; roles of academics and administrators; performance-based funding versus increased differentiation. Measurement is supposed to provide discipline, align institutional and state policy, and provide a vital impetus for change. Yet many of these measurement instruments are not fully fit for purpose. They do not take sufficient account of institutional missions, either of “old” or of specialist universities; and sophisticated measurement of the student experience requires massive resources. Change and positioning have become increasingly key elements of a complex but heterogeneous sector requiring new services and upgraded instruments.

Power, Discourse, Ethics

A Policy Study of Academic Freedom

Series:

Kenneth D. Gariepy

In this unique study, emerging higher education leader and policy expert Kenneth D. Gariepy takes a Foucauldian genealogical approach to the study of the intellectually “free” subject through the analysis of selected academic freedom statement-events. Assuming academic freedom to be an institutionalized discourse-practice operating in the field of contemporary postsecondary education in Canada, a specific kind of cross-disciplinary, historico-theoretical research is conducted that pays particular attention to the productive nature and effects of power-knowledge. The intent is to disrupt academic freedom as commonsensical “good” and universal “right” in order to instead focus on how it is that the academic subject emerges as free/unfree to think—and therefore free/unfree to be—through particular, effective, and effecting regimes of truth and strategies of objectification and subjectification. In this way, the author suggests how it is that academic freedom operates as a set of systemically agonistic practices that might only realize a different economy of discourse through the contingent nature of the very social power that produces it.