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I am a Linguist

With a foreword by Peter Matthews

R.M.W. Dixon

I am a Linguist provides a fascinating account of the academic adventures of multi-faceted linguist, R.M.W. (Bob) Dixon. There is fieldwork (and lengthy grammars) on Dyirbal, Yidiñ and other Aboriginal languages of Australia, the Boumaa dialect of Fijian, and Jarawara from the dense jungles of Amazonia. Theoretical studies include adjective classes, ergativity and complement clauses. There are also detective novels, science fiction stories, and pioneering work on blues and gospel discography. Interspersed with the autobiographical narrative are explanations of how linguistics is a scientific discipline, of the development of universities, of diminishing academic standards, and of the treatment of Aboriginal people in Australia. The book is written in an easy, accessible style with numerous illustrative anecdotes. It will be an inspiration to young linguists and of interest to the general reader curious about what a scientific linguist does.

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Anton Lustig

Dr. Anton Lustig’s Grammar and Dictionary of Zaiwa is a thorough and unique documentation of this main language of the Jingpo minority in southwest China. Volume I clarifies the precise meanings of numerous grammatical and lexical categories, in a holistic and all-encompassing but also vivid way, offering real insight into the conceptual universe of this typologically highly interesting tonal language, with suprasegmental traits. Volume II contains a dictionary, stories and songs. This work is also a historical monument for and tribute to this endangered language.
With financial support of the International Institute for Asian Studies (www.iias.nl).

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Erik Andvik

A Grammar of Tshangla is the first major linguistic description of Tshangla, a Tibeto-Burman language spoken in Bhutan, northeast India, and southwest China. Written from a functional-typological perspective, it contains a wealth of illustrative examples both from elicited data and from spontaneously generated texts. It is a truly comprehensive description, including sections on phonology, lexicon, morphophonemics, morphosyntactic structure, clause-concatenating constructions, as well as discourse-pragmatic features.
The volume will be of interest to language students, and to linguists and ethnographic scholars seeking to understand the Bhutanese and South Asian linguistic situation. The large amount of raw language data presented here make this Grammar of Tshangla an indispensable tool for students of Tibeto-Burman comparative linguistics and morphosyntactic theory in general.

Linguistics and Archaeology in the Americas

The Historization of Language and Society

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Edited by Eithne B. Carlin and Simon van de Kerke

The contributors to this volume, an international group of leading specialists, guide us through different aspects of the study of Amerindian languages and societies that lie at the heart of the extensive and multi-facetted work of Willem Adelaar, the forerunning specialist in Native American studies of Meso and South America, and Professor of Amerindian Studies at Leiden University. The contributors focus on three larger regions, the Andes, Amazonia, Meso-America and the Circum-Caribbean region, giving us a state of the art overview of current linguistic and archaeological research trends that illuminate the dynamicity and historicity of the Americas, in migratory movements, contact situations, grouping and re-grouping of identities and the linguistic results thereof. This book is a must-have for all scholars of the American continent.

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Steven Fassberg

Aramaic has been spoken uninterruptedly for more than 3000 years, yet a generation from now most Aramaic dialects will be extinct. The study of the Northeastern Neo-Aramaic (NENA) dialects has increased dramatically in the past decade as linguists seek to record these dialects before the disappearance of their last speakers. This work is a unique documentation of the now extinct Jewish Neo-Aramaic dialect of Challa (modern-day Çukurca, Turkey). It is based on recordings of the last native speaker of the dialect, who passed away in 2007. In addition to a grammatical description, it contains sample texts and a glossary of the dialect. Jewish Challa belongs to the cluster of NENA dialects known as 'lishana deni' and reference is made throughout to other dialects within this group.

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John T. King

The present work, a grammar of Dhimal, fills an important void in the documentation of the vast and ramified Tibeto-Burman language family. Dhimal, a little known and endangered tongue spoken in the lowlands of southeastern Nepal by about 20,000 individuals, is detailed in this work. With data gathered in the village of Āṭhiyābārī, the author crafts a readable description of the western dialect, using over 1000 examples to illustrate usage. Included in this reference work are seventeen texts, riddles, songs and a Dhimal-English glossary. Joining other recent ground-breaking linguistic descriptions by researchers from the Himalayan Languages Project at Leiden University, this grammar of Dhimal will have lasting scientific value and aid the Dhimal community in preserving their language.

Languages of the Greater Himalayan Region, Volume 7 A Grammar of Sunwar

Descriptive Grammar, Paradigms, Texts and Glossary

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Dörte Borchers

This description of Sunwar, an endangered Tibeto-Burman language spoken in eastern Nepal, is based on extensive field work by the author and contains a chapter with background information on the Sunwar language, its speakers and their culture, followed by sections on the phonology, the indigenous writing system and the morphology of Sunwar. Verb paradigms, glossed texts, a Sunwar-English glossary and bibliographical references are also presented.
Contact between the Sunwar and Nepali languages resulted in language change, most visible in the verbal system, where the older biactantial agreement system typical for Kiranti languages disappeared and suffix conjugations emerged.
This book will interest those interested in descriptive linguistics, language change and languages of South Asia.

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Umbavu Joseph

The Rabha’s inhabit the plains on both sides of the Brahmaputra river in Assam, in the North East of India. Their language is Rabha, a member of the Tibeto-Burman language family.
This is the first ever comprehensive grammar of the Róngdani dialect of Rabha, as spoken in, a.o., the Rabha heartlands. Based on extensive field work by the author, this work is yet another significant step in the meticulous task of piecing together the jigsaw of Himalayan languages as undertaken by George van Driem and his team. Given the steady decline of the Rabha language in favour of Assamese, all those interested in the language and history of the Himalayas and Northern India will welcome this volume.
With a Rabha dictionary/vocabulary, and a series of key Rabha texts shedding light on its people’s customs.
With financial support of the International Institute of Asian Studies (www.iias.nl).

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Heleen Plaisier

The Lepcha language has been shrouded in a veil of tantalising mystique ever since Colonel George Mainwaring in the 1870s disseminated the myth that Lepcha was the most perfect of tongues and represented the primordial language of men and fairies. The present book is the first ever comprehensive reference grammar of this language, spoken by the indigenous tribal people of Darjeeling, Sikkim and Kalimpong. Some popular lore about Lepcha has a firm basis in fact, however. Lepcha represents a branch unto itself within the Tibeto-Burman languages. Lepcha is written in its own unique script. This highly readable grammar explains the structure of the language, its sound system and salient features, and includes a lexicon and cultural history. With financial support of the International Institute for Asian Studies (www.iias.nl).

The Karaite Tradition of Hebrew Grammatical Thought in its Classical Form (2 Vols.)

A Critical Edition and English Translation of al-Kitāb al-Kāfī fī al-Luġa al-ʿIbrāniyya by ʾAbū al-Faraj Hārūn ibn al-Faraj

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Judith Olszowy-Schlanger, María Ángeles Gallego and Geoffrey Khan

The book, consisting of two volumes, presents a critical edition and an annotated English translation of the work on Hebrew grammar al-Kitāb al-Kāfī fī al-Luġa al-'Ibārniyya by the medieval Karaite grammarian 'Abū al-Faraj Hārūn Ibn Faraj. This was one of the most important works on Hebrew grammar that was written in the Middle Ages, which, however, was lost to knowledge for several centuries and is here recovered from medieval manuscripts for the first time in a modern edition.
In addition to the text edition and translation, the book contains an introduction on the background of the text and the codicology of the manuscripts.
This publication will be of interest not only to Hebraists and Biblical scholars but also to scholars concerned with the history of linguistic thought and medieval thought in general.