Ottoman Law of War and Peace

The Ottoman Empire and Its Tribute-Payers from the North of the Danube. Second Revised Edition

Viorel Panaite

Making use of legal and historical sources, Viorel Panaite analyzes the status of tribute-payers from the north of the Danube with reference to Ottoman law of peace and war. He deals with the impact of Ottoman holy war and the way conquest in Southeast Europe took place; the role of temporary covenants, imperial diplomas and customary norms in outlining the rights and duties of the tributary princes; the power relations between the Ottoman Empire and the tributary-protected principalities of Wallachia, Moldavia and Transylvania. He also focuses on the legal and political methods applied to extend the pax ottomanica system in the area, rather than on the elements that set these territories apart from the rest of the Ottoman Empire.

Pentecostal Theology and Ecumenical Theology

Interpretations and Intersections

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Edited by Peter Hocken, Tony L. Richie and Christopher A. Stephenson

Pentecostal Theology and Ecumenical Theology: Interpretations, Intersections, and Inspirations brings together globally recognized and newer scholars to address the complex relationship between Pentecostalism and the Ecumenical Movement. Historical essays address topics such as early Pentecostal responses to and participation in ecumenism, explicit convergences between Pentecostal and ecumenical initiatives, and the particular contributions of Pentecostals and ecumenists outside North America and Europe. Constructive theological essays address intersections between ecumenical theology and systematic loci in Pentecostal perspective, in the hope that mutual exchange and criticism will lead to ways to improve both. Never before have this many scholars of Pentecostalism combined their efforts in order to focus on the relationship between Pentecostal theology and ecumenical theology past, present, and future.

Perspectives on Evil

From Banality to Genocide

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Edited by Kanta Dihal

The question of evil is one of the oldest and most intensely studied topics in intellectual history. In fiction, legend and mythology the boundary between good and evil is often depicted as clear-cut, at least to the reader or listener, who is supposed to understand such tales as lessons and warnings. Evil is something that must be avoided by the hero in some cases and vanquished in others; it is either the exact opposite of the expected good behaviour, or its complete absence. Even so, for the characters in these didactic fictions, it turns out to be deceptively easy to fall to the infernal, ‘dark’ side. The chapters in this volume share a common thread – they all engage with ‘real’ evil: events and deeds of an evil nature that have been lived in the (recent) past and have become part of history, rather than fictional evil.

Peter von Danzig

The Story of a Great Caravel, 1462-1475

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Beata Możejko

This study traces the chequered history of Peter von Danzig, a French caravel which was inadvertently taken over by Gdańsk (Danzig). Beata Możejko charts the fluctuating and often dramatic fortunes of the caravel, from her arrival in Gdańsk as a merchantman in 1462 to her demise near La Rochelle in 1475. The author examines the caravel’s role as a warship during the Anglo-Hanseatic conflict, and her most famous operation, when she was used by Gdańsk privateer Paul Beneke to capture a Burgundian galley with a rich cargo that included Hans Memling’s Last Judgement triptych.
Using literary and archival sources, Możejko provides a comprehensive overview and analysis of the information available about the caravel and her colourful career.

Philo of Alexandria and Greek Myth

Narratives, Allegories, and Arguments

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Edited by Francesca Alesse

In Philo of Alexandria and Greek Myth: Narratives, Allegories, and Arguments, a fresh and more complete image of Philo of Alexandria as a careful reader, interpreter, and critic of Greek literature is offered. Greek mythology plays a significant role in Philo of Alexandria’s exegetical oeuvre. Philo explicitly adopts or subtly evokes narratives, episodes and figures from Greek mythology as symbols whose didactic function we need to unravel, exactly as the hidden teaching of Moses’ narration has to be revealed by interpreters of Bible. By analyzing specific mythologems and narrative cycles, the contributions to this volume pave the way to a better understanding of Philo’s different attitudes towards literary and philosophical mythology.

Poetik der Nation

Englishness in der englischen Romantik

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Ulrike Kristina Köhler

This comparative study focuses on the manifestations of Englishness in genres of English Romanticism. Adopting a production-oriented and context-sensitive perspective, the study inspects the political essay, the travelogue, the Gothic novel and the ballad through the imagological lens. The interplay of national stereotypes and topoi with generic elements without national connotation is at the core of this study. Special attention is given to the addressee, cultural knowledge, narrative situation and focalisation as well as to lyric-specific elements. Furthermore the study highlights how the tools of narratology, cultural memory studies, reception theory, rhetoric and text linguistics can be integrated more effectively into the toolkit of imagology. Consequently national images can be deconstructed in a more differentiated way than hitherto possible.

Die vergleichende Fallstudie richtet den Blick auf die Erscheinungsformen von Englishness in Gattungen der englischen Romantik. Aus einer produktionsästhetischen wie kontextbewussten Perspektive legt sie den politischen Essay, den Reisebericht, die Gothic novel und die Ballade unter das imagologische Mikroskop. Dabei gilt das Interesse dem Zusammenspiel von nationalen Stereotypen und Topoi mit Gattungselementen ohne nationale Konnotation. Der Adressat, kulturelles Wissen, Erzählsituation und Fokalisierung sowie lyrikspezifische Elemente stehen dabei im Fokus. In theoretischer Hinsicht zeigt die Untersuchung, wie sich das Handwerkszeug der Narratologie, der kulturwissenschaftlichen Gedächtnisforschung, der Rezeptionsästhetik, der Rhetorik und der Textlinguistik weit stärker als bisher gewinnbringend in das Analyseinstrumentarium der Imagologie integrieren lässt. So lassen sich nationenbezogene Bilder zukünftig nuancierter nachzeichnen und im Zuge dessen besser dekonstruieren.

The Precursors of Proto-Indo-European

The Indo-Anatolian and Indo-Uralic Hypotheses

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Edited by Alwin Kloekhorst and Tijmen Pronk

In The Precursors of Proto-Indo-European some of the world’s leading experts in historical linguistics shed new light on two hypotheses about the prehistory of the Indo-European language family, the so-called Indo-Anatolian and Indo-Uralic hypotheses. The Indo-Anatolian hypothesis states that the Anatolian branch of the Indo-European family should be viewed as a sister language of ‘classical’ Proto-Indo-European, the ancestor of all the other, non-Anatolian branches. The common ancestor of all Indo-European languages, including Anatolian, can then be called Proto-Indo-Anatolian. The Indo-Uralic hypothesis states that the closest genetic relative of Indo-European is the Uralic language family, and that both derive from a common ancestor called Proto-Indo-Uralic. The book unravels the history of these hypotheses and scrutinizes the evidence for and against them.

Contributors are Stefan H. Bauhaus, Rasmus G. Bjørn, Dag Haug, Petri Kallio, Simona Klemenčič, Alwin Kloekhorst, Frederik Kortlandt, Guus Kroonen, Martin J. Kümmel, Milan Lopuhaä-Zwakenberg, Alexander Lubotsky, Rosemarie Lühr, Michaël Peyrot, Tijmen Pronk, Andrei Sideltsev, Michiel de Vaan, Mikhail Zhivlov.

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Jonathan Hall

Bakhtin and Voloshinov argued that dialogue is the intersubjective basis of consciousness, and of the creativity which makes historical changes in consciousness possible. The multiple dialogical relationships give every subject, who has developed through internalising them, the potential to distance him/herself from them. Consciousness is therefore an “unfinalised” process, always open to a possible future which would not merely reiterate the past. But this book explores its corollary: The relative openness is a field of conflict where rival discourses struggle for hegemony, by subordinating or eliminating their rivals. That is how the unconscious is created out of socio-historical conflicts. Hegemony is always incomplete, because there is always the possibility of a return of its repressed rivals in new combinations.

Regional Integration and Migration in Africa

Lessons from Southern and West Africa

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Vusi Gumede, Samuel Ojo Oloruntoba and Serges Djoyou Kamga

This comparative book debates migration and regional integration in the two regional economic blocs, namely the Southern African Development Community (SADC) and the Economic Community of West African States (ECOWAS). The book takes a historical and nuanced citizenship approach to integration by analysing regional integration from the perspective of non-state actors and how they negotiate various structures and institutions in their pursuit for life and livelihood in a contemporary context marked by mobility and economic fragmentation.

Reinventing Jihād

Jihād Ideology From the Conquest of Jerusalem to the end of the Ayyūbids (c. 492/1099–647/1249)

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Kenneth A. Goudie

In Reinventing Jihād, Kenneth A. Goudie provides a detailed examination of the development of jihād ideology from the Conquest of Jerusalem to the end of the Ayyūbids (c. 492/1099–647/1249). By analysing the writings of three scholars - Abū al Ḥasan al Sulamī (d. 500/1106), Ibn ʿAsākir (d. 571/1176), and ʿIzz al-Dīn al-Sulamī (d. 660/1262) - Reinventing Jihād demonstrates that the discourse on jihād was much broader than previously thought, and that authors interwove a range of different understandings of jihād in their attempts to encourage jihād against the Franks. More importantly, Reinventing Jihad demonstrates that whilst the practice of jihād did not begin in earnest until the middle of the twelfth century, the same cannot be said about jihād ideology: interest in jihād ideology was reinvigorated almost from the moment of the arrival of the Franks.