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Legacies for Social Change
From a rationale of multiculturalism and a based on systemic approach grounded in the Arab-Islamic tradition, this book integrates history, education, science, and feminism to understand the implications of culture in social change, cultural identity, and cultural exchange. Dr. Belhachmi’s praxis maintains the relationship between socio-political movements, and their corollary scientific movements to explain women’s role in social change of the Arab-Islamic world; thus linking the region’s past and the present in a historical continuum. In one masterful move, she immediately engages into a discovery -journey of the 13 century old Arab-Islamic socio-cultural and intellectual history; thus exploring the independent Arab-Islamic Worldview of development, modernism, science, education, and discusses the corollary socio-political and reform movements that integrated women in the region’s governance over time. Thus, she not only highlights women’s involvement in social change as a recurrent cyclical phenomenon in the region, but also chronicles the women-led independent 120 years of Arab-Islamic feminist science.
Above all, Dr. Belhachmi offers an innovative operational three-levelled model of analysis of education and feminist practice that reconciles particularism and universalism, and yields to systemic analyses of women in education cross-culturally. In doing so, the book shifts focus from the “woman’s question” into the more radical issues of “women’s science” in the Arab-Islamic culture; illustrating with the work of al-Sa'dawi (Egypt) and Mernissi (Morocco). As such this study is both a groundbreaking epistemological study on the role Arab-Muslim women and social change over time, and an essential textbook on women in contemporary Arab-Islamic education, and social sciences.
In a tour de force, Dr. Belhachmi reclaims Arab-Islamic feminist scientific legacy as organic to the region’s institutional memory and its collective cultural reference, while restoring to Arab-Muslim women feminists; including herself, their epistemic space within the contemporary multi-discursive practice/space of international feminism.; thus offering us a timely pioneering book on Arab-Islamic feminist epistemology. Equally, she provides us with a new scientific framework for self-representation and cultural exchange much needed both in international education and “a new feminist international order.”
In brief, this is an original scholarly work that provides us with creative empowerment methods, qualitative methodologies and holistic conceptual tools; thus enabling us to re-think our “rapport to knowledge” and the place of knowledge itself and how its related research strategies can move us beyond the pitfalls of cultural relativism and scientism. As such, this is an invaluable addition to the literature on the Middle East and North Africa region (MENA) that will benefit the layman tremendously; and a must reference for specialists and students alike.
Educating for the Good Society
This book looks to feminist utopian thinking to seek alternative conceptualisations of the issue of gender and education. We are currently faced with a situation where the issue of gender has become one of competing needs. Debates on gender have swung from a concern for the progress of girls and women to a ‘moral panic’ about the lack of engagement of boys in education. The formulation of policy that swings from concerns and initiatives to support the educational progress of girls and women to a crisis about the engagement of boys and young men in education is ultimately to the detriment of both genders, to the educational system and to society as a whole. There is an urgent need for us to consider alternative approaches to the issue of gender and education. In utopian writing, education has been constructed as one of the means of bringing about ‘the good society’ but importantly within feminist utopian writing and thinking what we understand as ‘education’ is itself being transformed. In feminist utopian thinking, side by side with a critique of formal educational institutions, there is an attempt to think more holistically about the relationship between the educative process and the achievement of girls’ and women’s self-determination both individually and collectively to bring about a realignment of gender relationships in the sociopolitical order. This book draws from the debates about gender in the visions of alternative sociopolitical orders found in feminist utopian thinking to explore the issue of gender and education. This book will be of special relevance to those interested in feminism, gender studies, educational futures and utopian thinking.
Since the first book, Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone came out in the United States in 1997; it and the six subsequent volumes have been on the New York Times bestsellers list continuously. Harry Potter no longer solely exists in books; he is everywhere dominating our world and our children’s worlds, which is why it is important to analyze just what Harry Potter is teaching our children. Although the Harry Potter series has been critiqued and analyzed by journalists and academics alike, there are fascinating gaps in the analyses. Perhaps the most rousing of these gaps is the virtual lack of attention to the ways in which J. K. Rowling has constructed gender, and the agency of the female characters, within the texts. The purpose of this book is to address this rousing gap, by critically deconstructing the representation of women’s agency by the female characters in the Harry Potter books 2-6. The study draws on all of the pre-existing theories, frameworks, underpinnings and themes that came out of the analysis that were set forth in the pilot study/first book that critically deconstructed the first Harry Potter book. There are many different books that discuss the Harry Potter phenomenon, but rarely do they analyze the books through a social justice lens, specifically looking at gender.
Learning Identity, Gender, and Power via Engineering Practice
On the Outskirts of Engineering: Learning Identity, Gender, and Power via Engineering Practice falls at the intersection of research about women in sites of technical practice and ethnographic studies of learning in communities of practice. Grounded in long-term participation on student teams completing real-world projects for industry and government clients, Outskirts provides an insider look at forms of engineering practice—the cultural production of engineer identity, of the ways that gender is made real in such sites of practice, and of power relations that emerge in response to enculturated practices that organize everyday life. Outskirts contributes to understanding cultural obduracy and the movement of some men and most women to the outskirts of engineering.
Visual Methodologies for Social Change
Getting the picture, constructing (and deconstructing) the picture, finding the picture, viewing the picture, being in the picture, changing the pictures—these are all phrases that apply to the fascinating world of ‘putting people in the picture’ in visual research within the Social Sciences. Putting People in the Picture: Visual Methodologies for Social Change focuses on the ways in which researchers, practitioners and activists are using such techniques as photo voice, collaborative video, drawings and other visual and arts-based tools as modes of inquiry, as modes of representation and as modes of disseminating findings in social research. The various chapters address methodological, analytical, interpretive, aesthetic, technical and ethical concerns in using visual methodologies in work with young people, teachers, community health care workers—and even the self-as-researcher. The range of issues addressed in the work is broad, and includes work in the areas of HIV & AIDS, schooling, poverty, gender violence, race, and children’s visions for the future. While the studies are situated within a variety of social contexts, the focus is primarily on work in Southern Africa. The book takes up some of the theoretical and practical challenges offered by Visual Sociology, Image-based Research, Media Studies, Rural Development, and Community-based and Participatory Research, and in so doing offers audiences an array of visual approaches to studying and bringing about social change.
Ultra-Orthodox Women Working Outside the Haredi Community
In this book Devorah Kalekin-Fisman and Karlheinz Schneider analyze how the relationship between the traditional and the modern is unfolding in a particular milieu by centering on the Haredi women in Israel who become part of the national (rather than the community) work force. The book is based on analyses of interviews with people in the Haredi world. The authors’ goal is to attain an understanding of what women’s work means to the women, to their families, and to the Haredi community as a whole, by placing women’s self-presentations in the context of sociological literatures relating to the sociology of religion and the sociology of gender.
The focal issue is the question of how traditionalism fares when the legitimator / monitor of tradition in the home encounters the constraints of modernity through her studies and her work.
Women Breaking Educational Barriers in Traditional Societies
Higher education systems in many countries are undergoing significant changes in response to variety of local, national, and international pressures. Among these, the shift from elitism to the provision of mass higher education; increased impact of internationalization and globalization, which are increasingly blurring national boundaries; increased competition among universities for limited resources to support higher education sector; the impact of technology and the knowledge economy; and the continuing quest educational for equity.
Given what we already know about the position of women in the academy, what is so significant about the account of women represented in this book? Lessons from colleagues in Western universities provide important models for understanding some aspects of gendered identity of women scholars; however, a deeper understanding of educational experiences for women in countries such as China, Turkey, Iran, Pakistan, may potentially offer innovative insights to our current understanding of gender within education. In this age of globalization, there are common themes that transcend the experiences of women across very different social, cultural, economic, and political contexts. Therefore, accounts of women scholars represented in this volume demonstrate that the experiences women scholars are not isolated incidents but global phenomena, and may offer alternative approaches to problems that seem insurmountable to women at the bottom of the professional ladder.
Further, the experiences of non-Western women scholars are important because it is only through an understanding of their educational conditions that institutions can implement policies and practices to respond effectively, and to create work environments that are supportive to professional aspirations of these scholars. Effective policies can only be attained when there is a clear understanding of the barriers and challenges female scholars. Given that gender concerns, especially in non-Western countries, have historically occupied and to some extent continue to occupy a marginal position in the daily operations of institutions of higher education, it is critical to highlight their potentially harmful effects not only on women scholars, but on institutions as well.
Award-winning author Grace Feuerverger explores teaching and learning in schools as a sacred life journey, a quest toward liberation. Written for teacher/educators who wish to make a real difference in the lives of their students, this book speaks to everyone who finds themselves, as she did, on winding and often treacherous paths, longing to discover the meaning and potential in their professional lives at school. A child of Holocaust survivors, Feuerverger wrote this book to tell how schools can be transformed into magical places where miracles happen. In an era of narrow agendas of ‘efficiency’ and ‘control,’ this book dares to suggest that education is and should always be about uplifting the human spirit.
...The Life of a Palestinian
Most children come into life, initially at least, with a degree of trust that they are going to be treated fairly. The way a social order kills that sense of trust is often cumulative, overt and consciously executed. Within such a situation it is likely that, once becoming a man (or woman), he will not develop an instinctive inhibition about killing his co-species. One will commit such an act upon a group or individual with whom he has no sense of identity and with whom there is no empathy or conscious feeling of guilt relating to their destruction. It is an uncomfortable revelation and a hideous result of social deconstruction. Such is the case Jenna Hayat, a young woman Palestinian woman. A limping soul navigating through a dismal passage of existence, Israeli occupation is a septic wound in her heart that can't be healed, and being Palestinian is like being punished for a crime she hasn't committed. She is not hell-bent revolutionary; she is not a feminist or a nationalist, and she is not a psychopath with a death wish. She is just an ordinary young woman, trapped amid savaged inequalities. Jenna once remarked to a close friend that life was so long when you are not happy. Hers was very unhappy. Her mother succumbs to cancer, she is not permitted to marry the only man she ever loved, and she feels herself alone in is world in which there is no mercy. A martyrdom mission makes perfect sense in a life such as hers and longevity is inconsequential. Jenna makes a final and far-reaching decision, which is to look for her mercy from God instead of mere mortal men.
New Insights into Feminist Educational Leadership
The book analyzes the crossing issues of gender, school leadership and multicultural experiences as expressed in accounts of female school principals from diverse ethnic and religious groups in the multicultural society of Israel. It addresses the usually unheard voices of women principals in ethnic and religious minority groups that act and live in a modern country but their place is marginalized. Jewish and Moslem Authors, all citizens of Israel, display the particular life and career accounts of female principals from the Arab, Bedouin, Kibbutzim, liberal and Ultra-Orthodox Jewish groups. They are accompanied by authors from Canada, Hong-Kong and England who suggest a multicultural and post-structuralist feminist views to look at female leadership in the multicultural society. In this sense, they book contributes to our understanding of the influence of cultural scripts and values on women principals’ leadership styles and career development, as well as suggest an alternative way to interpret dominant feminist conceptualizations of female leadership. The book may be of interest for researchers in the fields of education, feminism, women management, multiculturalism, Israel studies and minorities. Educators of a higher level such as principals, supervisors and policy makers as well as graduate students will find the book chapters very contributing to their work and studies.