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The sixteenth-century French poets Pierre de Ronsard and Guillaume Du Bartas enjoyed a wide, immediate and long-lasting, but varied and mixed reception throughout early modern Europe. This volume is the first book length monograph to study the transnational reception histories of both poets in conjunction with each other. It takes into account the great variety of their readerships, including translators, imitating poets, poetical theorists, illustrators and painters, both male and female (Marie de Gournay, Anne Bradstreet), some of them illustrious (Tasso, King James VI and I of Scotland and England, Opitz…), others less known, even obscure, but worth to be saved from oblivion (such as the French Marc-Antoine Chalon, the English Mary Roper, and the Dutch poet Philibert van Borsselen). This volume offers a fascinating insight into the different reception modes in Europe and their underlying political, religious and literary identities.

Contributors include: Peter Auger, Denis Bjaï, Karel Bostoen †, Philippe Chométy, Paola Cosentino, Violaine Giacomotto-Charra, Alisa van de Haar, Pádraic Lamb, Anne-Pascale Pouey-Mounou, Elisabeth Rothmund, Paul J. Smith, and Caroline Trotot.
Cartographie d’un genre émergent
Editor: Alexandre Gefen
Si les siècles qui précédaient avaient vu le couronnement du roman, la littérature du XXIe siècle débute avec le triomphe du document : écritures de voyage, d’investigation, enquêtes judiciaires ou ethnologiques, autobiographies, factographies, factions, rapports et enregistrements littéraires, et autres formes de récits refusant de se dire fictions occupent nos librairies : émerge sous nos yeux une toute nouvelle littérature d'information, de témoignage, d’inventaire ou de documentation. Or ces textes ne se contentent pas de déjouer les critères des classements des bibliothèques et d’intriguer les théoriciens du récit, ils modifient profondément les catégories du littéraire et imposent leur poétique propre. C’est dire si l’heure est à inventorier et à comprendre les territoires de la non-fiction, genre capital de notre contemporain.

If the previous centuries had seen the crowning of the novel, the literature of the 21st century begins with the triumph of the document: travel writings, investigative, criminal or ethnological investigations, autobiographies, “factographies”, factions, literary reports and recordings, and other forms of narrative that refuse to call themselves fictions occupy our bookstores : a whole new literature of information, testimony, inventory or documentation is emerging before our eyes. Yet these texts not only thwart the criteria of library classifications and intrigue narrative theorists, they also profoundly modify the categories of the literary and impose their own poetics. In other words, the time has come to inventory and understand the territories of non-fiction, the capital genre of our time.
In Transcultural Migration in the Novels of Hédi Bouraoui: A New Ulysses, Elizabeth Sabiston analyses the dominant theme of transcultural migration, or immigration, in Hédi Bouraoui’s fiction. His protagonists reflect his passion for endless travel, and are Ulysses-figures for the postmodern age. Their travels enable them to explore the “Otherness of the Other,” to understand and “migrate” into them.
Bouraoui’s World Literature is rooted in the traversées of his characters across a number of clearly differentiated regions, which nonetheless share a common humanity. The ancient migrations of Ulysses, fuelled by violence and war, are paralleled to the modern displacements of entire cultures and even nations. Bouraoui’s works bridge cultures past and present, but they also require the invention of language to convey a postmodern world in flux.