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Drawing for Science Education

An International Perspective

Edited by Phyllis Katz

This book argues for the essential use of drawing as a tool for science teaching and learning. The authors are working in schools, universities, and continual science learning (CSL) settings around the world. They have written of their experiences using a variety of prompts to encourage people to take pen to paper and draw their thinking—sometimes direct observation and in other instances, their memories. The result is a collection of research and essays that offer theory, techniques, outcomes, and models for the reader.
Young children have provided evidence of the perceptions that they have accumulated from families and the media before they reach classrooms. Secondary students describe their ideas of chemistry and physics. Teacher educators use drawings to consider the progress of their undergraduates’ understanding of science teaching and even their moral/ethical responses to teaching about climate change. Museum visitors have drawn their understanding of the physics of how exhibit sounds are transmitted. A physician explains how the history of drawing has been a critical tool to medical education and doctor-patient communications. Each chapter contains samples, insights, and where applicable, analysis techniques.
The chapters in this book should be helpful to researchers and teachers alike, across the teaching and learning continuum. The sections are divided by the kinds of activities for which drawing has historically been used in science education:
- An instance of observation (Audubon, Linnaeus);
- A process (how plants grow over time, what happens when chemicals combine);
- Conceptions of what science is and who does it;
- Images of identity development in science teaching and learning.

Sci-Book

STEPS to STEM – Student Science Notebook

Aaron D. Isabelle and Gilbert A. Zinn

A “Sci-Book” or “Science Notebook” serves as an essential companion to the science curriculum supplement, STEPS to STEM. As students learn key concepts in the seven “big ideas” in this program (Electricity & Magnetism; Air & Flight; Water & Weather; Plants & Animals; Earth & Space; Matter & Motion; Light & Sound), they record their ideas, plans, and evidence. There is ample space for students to keep track of their observations and findings, as well as a section to reflect upon the use of “Science and Engineering Practices” as set forth in the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS).
Using a science notebook is reflective of the behavior of scientists. One of the pillars of the Nature of Science is that scientists must document their work to publish their research results; it is a necessary part of the scientific enterprise. This is important because STEPS to STEM is a program for young scientists who learn within a community of scientists. Helping students to think and act like scientists is a critical feature of this program. Students learn that they need to keep a written record if they are to successfully share their discoveries and curiosities with their classmates and with the teacher. Teachers should also model writing in science to help instill a sense of purpose and pride in using and maintaining a Sci-Book. Lastly, students’ documentation can serve as a valuable form of authentic assessment; teachers can utilize Sci-Books to monitor the learning process and the development of science skills.

A Companion to Interdisciplinary STEM Project-Based Learning

For Educators by Educators (Second Edition)

Edited by Robert M. Capraro, Mary Margaret Capraro, Jennifer G. Whitfield and Matthew J. Etchells

This text contains 24 Project-Based Learning (PBL) lessons written by high school teachers (adaptable for middle school) that include lesson appropriate for all subjects. All the PBL lessons in the book were used in urban high-school classrooms. The lessons were developed over a three-year period while working with the Aggie Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) Center. The PBL lessons are mostly extended activities but adaptable to various situations and are interdisciplinary covering science, mathematics, technology, engineering, social studies, and language arts objectives. Each chapter contains the information necessary to implement each lesson, including handouts, scenario descriptions, rubrics for scoring, and all the elements likely to ensure successful implementation. All lessons include both formative and summative assessment tools as well as a separate section on assessment with sample multiple-choice items matched to high-stakes assessments common in most states. This practical book is the perfect companion to the handbook for learning about implementing PBLs: Project-based Learning: An Integrated Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) Approach.

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Edited by Kathryn Scantlebury, Jane Butler Kahle and Sonya N. Martin

Women in science education are placed in a juxtaposition of gender roles and gendered career roles. Using auto/biography and auto/ethnography, this book examines the challenges and choices of academic women in science education and how those challenges have changed, or remained consistent, since women have become a presence in science education. The book’s contributors span a temporal and spatial continuum and focus on how a variety of issues relate to the paradoxes for academic women in science education. Science is characterized as a masculine endeavor, while teaching is described as “women’s true profession”. Thus, female academics involved in science education are positioned in two paradoxes. First, as teachers they are involved in a feminized profession. However, within that profession, women faculty in science education work in a discipline viewed as a masculine enterprise. Further, these women work in educational institutions that have higher status and prestige than their sisters in elementary, middle or high schools. Second, female professors are “bearded mothers”. Women who have engaged in science education value rationality and logic and assume authority as participants in academe. The use of logic, the acceptance of authority and the assumption of power are masculine gender-stereotyped characteristics. This situation places women in a paradox, because others, including peers and students, expect them to display stereotypic female gender dispositions, such as mothering/nurturing, sacrificing their needs for others, and a commitment to the institution.
The topics include: discussing how their engagement with science impacted their career trajectories and re-direction from science to science education, the relationships of cultural and racial factors on career trajectories, and the dialectical relationship between women’s private|public lives and their agency (collective and individual) in the academy and its enactment within academic fields. The book documents the lives and careers of academic women in science education from the United States, Australia, the Caribbean, United Kingdom, and Europe.

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Christopher Emdin

Christopher Emdin is an assistant professor of science education and director of secondary school initiatives at the Urban Science Education Center at Teachers College, Columbia University. He holds a Ph.D. in urban education with a concentration in mathematics, science and technology; a master’s degree in natural sciences; and a bachelor’s degree in physical anthropology, biology, and chemistry.
His book, Urban Science Education for the Hip-Hop Generation is rooted in his experiences as student, teacher, administrator, and researcher in urban schools and the deep relationship between hip-hop culture and science that he discovered at every stage of his academic and professional journey. The book utilizes autobiography, outcomes of research studies, theoretical explorations, and accounts of students’ experiences in schools to shed light on the causes for the lack of educational achievement of urban youth from the hip-hop generation.

The continuum of secondary science teacher preparation

Knowledge, questions, and research recommendations

Edited by Angelo Collins and Nicole Gillespie

The mission of the Knowles Science Teaching Foundation (KSTF), to increase the quantity of high quality high school science and mathematics teachers in United States High Schools, calls for a deeper understanding of what it takes to prepare and support successful teachers. On September 21, 2006, KSTF convened a group of 41 individuals with a broad range of perspectives and expertise to address three essential questions with regard to secondary science teacher preparation: What do we know, what do we need to find out, and what research will help us fill in the gaps? Participants were intentionally selected from a diverse cross section of the education community and included teachers, educational researchers, teacher educators, policy specialists and scientists. The 41 participants formed 12 working groups and spent two and a half days addressing the following aspects of teacher preparation:
· recruitment and retention; · models of secondary science teacher preparation; · pedagogic preparation including field-based experiences, methods courses, and preparing teachers for diverse populations; · content preparation in biology, chemistry, Earth science, and physics as well as the nature of science in general; · induction; · mentoring.
Each working group was tasked with synthesizing their discussions and conclusions for the entire group of conference participants and in a written document. This volume represents the final outcome of that conference; 12 chapters that reflect the work of 40 dedicated scholars and practitioners who share a deep commitment to the pursuit of excellence in the preparation of secondary science teachers.

Dialogism

A Bakhtinian Perspective on Science and Learning

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Wolff-Michael Roth

In this book, Wolff-Michael Roth takes a 38-minute conversation in one science classroom as an occasion for analyzing learning and development from a perspective by and large inspired by the works of Mikhail Bakhtin but also influenced by Lev Vygotsky and 20th century European phenomenology and American pragmatism. He throws a new and very different light on the nature and use of language in science classroom, and its transformation. In so doing, he not only exposes the weaknesses of existing theoretical frameworks, including radical and social constructivism, but also exhibits problems in his own previous thinking about knowing and learning in science classrooms. The book particularly addresses issues normally out of the light of sight of science education research, including the material bodily principle, double-voicedness, laughter, coarse language, swearing, the carnal and carnivalistic aspects of life, code-switching, and the role of vernacular in the transformation of scientific language. The author suggests that only a unit of analysis that begins with the fullness of life, singular, unique, and once-occurrent Being, allows an understanding of learning and development, emotion and motivation, that is, knowing science in its relation to the human condition writ large. In this, the book provides responses to questions that conceptual change research, for example, is unable to answer, for example, the learning paradox, the impossibility to eradicate misconceptions, and the resistance of teachers to take a conceptual change position.

Environmental Education in Context

An International Perspective on the Development Environmental Education

Edited by Neil Taylor, Michael Littledyke, Chris Eames and Richard K. Coll

This book presents an international perspective on environmental educational and specifically the influence that context has on this aspect of curriculum. The focus is on environmental education both formal and non formal and the factors that impact upon its effectiveness, particularly in non-Western and non-English-speaking contexts (i.e., outside the UK, USA, Australia, NZ, etc. ). An important feature of the book is that it draws upon the experiences and research from local experts from an extremely diverse cohort across the world (25 countries and 2 regions in total). The book addresses topics such as: the development of environmental education in different countries, its implementation, the influence of political, cultural, societal or religious mores; governmental or ministerial drives; economic or other pressures driving curriculum reform; the influence of external assessment regimes on environmental education, and so on.

Fostering Scientific Habits of Mind

Pedagogical Knowledge and Best Practices in Science Education

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Edited by Issa M. Saleh and Myint Swe Khine

The history of human development records the courageous efforts made by the generation of teacher educators to train the school leaders who are responsible to implement educational policies. They have endured the burden and challenges of the times and refine the pedagogies and education systems with many innovative approaches. As the world faces increasing uncertainties and shift to knowledge economy, education plays a larger role in creating productive persons. Designing and managing learning school organizations that can sustain a competitive advantage in this fast-changing environment demands transformative leaders who would envision building intellectual capital for the future. Many books on teacher education, educational management and leadership exist in the past. But most books do not keep up with the fast-changing educational scene and only a few include future scenarios. This book presents anticipated trends and demands of the new knowledge economy, achieving goals with the use of various tools, generative and collaborative efforts, increasing leadership capability in dynamic and complex contexts, enculturation of cutting edge knowledge for educational advancement and creation of teams that focus learning organizations.
The book brings together prominent and leading teacher educators and researchers from around the world to present their scholarship, theories and practice, case studies, state-of-the- art approaches and future-oriented predictions. This book embodies collective knowledge inquiry and represents professional conversations. The chapters provides information on recent trends and development in teacher education, the important role of educational management and leadership in educational transformations, promising practices for desired outcomes. The book is a critical and specialized resource that describes how transformative leadership can play an important role in achieving excellence in education. The topics are covered in the book are: educational leadership and effective teaching, research in transformational leadership, and professional development and social capital building in schools.

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Edited by Alister Jones and Marc J. de Vries

This international handbook reflects on the development of the field of technology education. From reviewing how the field has developed and its current strengths, consideration is given to where the field might go and how it can be supported in this process.
This handbook argues that technology is an essential part of education for all and it provides a unique coverage of the developing field of technology education. It is divided into eight sections, from consideration of different approaches to education in different countries, through thinking about the nature of technology, perceptions of technology, relationships between science, technology and society, learning and teaching, assessment, teacher education and professional development, and developed and developing research approaches. This book constitutes a significant collection of work from numerous countries and authors actively engaged in technology education research and development. It is intended for graduate students, academics, researchers, curriculum developers, professional development providers, policy makers, and practitioners.
The development of this handbook represents an important step in the maturity of the field of technology education. The field has matured, as our technological society has matured, to the point that research and practice can be documented as shared in this publication. Historians will look at this international handbook as a significant, comprehensive step for a field of education that focuses on technology, innovation, design, and engineering for all students.
Kendall Starkweather, Ph.D., DTE, CAE. (ITEA Executive Director)