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Medieval Buda in Context discusses the character and development of Buda and its surroundings between the thirteenth and the sixteenth centuries, particularly its role as a royal center and capital city of the medieval Kingdom of Hungary. The twenty-one articles written by Hungarian and international scholars draw on a variety of primary sources: texts, both legal and literary; archaeological discoveries; architectural history; art history; and other studies of material culture. The essays also place Buda in the political, social, cultural and economic context of other contemporary central and eastern European cities. By bringing together the results of research undertaken in recent decades for an English-language readership, this volume offers new insights into urban history and the culture of Europe as a whole.
Contributors are János M. Bak, Zoltán Bencze, Judit Benda, István Draskóczy, Antonín Kalous, István Kenyeres, Gábor Klaniczay, András Kubinyi, József Laszlovszky, Károly Magyar, Balázs Nagy, Szilárd Papp, James Plumtree, Martyn Rady, Valery Rees, Orsolya Réthelyi, Beatrix F. Romhányi, Enikő Spekner, Péter Szabó, Katalin Szende, András Vadas, András Végh, and László Veszprémy.
A Study of Graves and Grave Goods, ca. 800 to ca. 1450
The Croatian medieval archaeological heritage from the 8th to the 15th century consists mostly of jewelry (earrings) findings from cemeteries. This book uses vertical and horizontal stratigraphy, on the basis of around 20,000 burial assemblages from 16 cemeteries (out of several hundred so far excavated in Croatia), to establish relative and absolute chronology of jewelry and burial architecture divided into three horizons and four phases in comparison with materials from neighboring regions of Europe.
In The Mortuary Archaeology of the Medieval Banat (10th – 14th centuries) Silviu Oţa highlights the interactions between different ethnic groups as reflected in burial customs and funerary practices. The book will deal with the Banat as a whole (as opposed to the Romanian, Serbian or Hungarian parts of the region) since the modern political borders are not identical with the cultural boundaries in the Middle Ages. On a more general level, the goal of this book is to analyse the social dynamics in the region. The author rejects the idea that any of the "archaeological cultures" identified in the Banat (e.g. the Bjelo Brdo culture) may be associated with any single ethnic group.

Winner of the 2016 George Bariţiu Prize from the Romanian Academy for outstanding contribution to the development of Romanian culture and science in the area of history and archaeology. The prize, named after the towering figure of George Bariţiu (1812-1893) in nineteenth-century Romanian political and cultural life and former president of the Academy, is awarded for originality of the work, its contribution to its field, and its impact at the national level of the field development.