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Conquest and Construction

Palace Architecture in Northern Cameroon

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Mark DeLancey

In Conquest and Construction Mark Dike DeLancey investigates the palace architecture of northern Cameroon, a region that was conquered in the early nineteenth century by primarily semi-nomadic, pastoralist, Muslim, Fulɓe forces and incorporated as the largest emirate of the Sokoto Caliphate. Palace architecture is considered first and foremost as political in nature, and therefore as responding not only to the needs and expectations of the conquerors, but also to those of the largely sedentary, agricultural, non-Muslim conquered peoples who constituted the majority population. In the process of reconciling the cultures of these various constituents, new architectural forms and local identities were constructed.

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Edited by Yuka Kadoi

In Arthur Upham Pope and A New Survey of Persian Art, fourteen scholars explore the legacy of Arthur Upham Pope (1881–1969) by tracing the formation of Persian art scholarship and connoisseurship during the twentieth century. Widely considered as a self-made scholar, curator, and entrepreneur, Pope was credited for establishing the basis of what we now categorize broadly as Persian art. His unrivalled professional achievement, together with his personal charisma, influenced the way in which many scholars and collectors worldwide came to understand the art, architecture and material culture of the Persian world. This ultimately resulted in the establishment of the aesthetic criteria for assessing the importance of cultural remains from modern-day Iran.

With contributions by Lindsay Allen, Sheila S. Blair, Jonathan M. Bloom, Talinn Grigor, Robert Hillenbrand, Yuka Kadoi, Sumru Belger Krody, Judith A. Lerner, Kimberly Masteller, Cornelia Montgomery, Bernard O’Kane, Keelan Overton, Laura Weinstein, and Donald Whitcomb.

L'art du livre en Asie centrale de la fin du XVIe siècle au début du XXe siècle

Étude des manuscrits coraniques de l'Institut d'Orientalisme Abū Rayḥān Bīrūnī

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Marie Efthymiou

Dans L'art du livre en Asie centrale de la fin du XVIe au début du XXe siècle, Marie Efthymiou met en lumière le riche patrimoine manuscrit de cette région encore mal connue. Traditionnellement rattaché au seul monde iranien, il apparaît au confluent de riches transferts culturels et de vastes circuits d'échanges, où émerge le rôle majeur de l'Inde du Nord et d'importantes spécificités locales.
Grâce à l'analyse méticuleuse des manuscrits coraniques de l'Institut Al Bīrūnī, Marie Efthymiou décrit les mutations des techniques de fabrication du livre, renouvelant la connaissance du papier de Samarcande et révélant le dynamisme de Kokand comme centre de production. Un questionnement novateur des usages du livre en restitue la place dans la société et les pratiques de dévotion.

In L'art du livre en Asie centrale de la fin du XVIe au début du XXe siècle, Marie Efthymiou sheds light on the rich cultural heritage of Central Asia, a still relatively unknown region. Traditionally considered part of a single Persian cultural domain, it in fact bears witness to a rich convergence of cultural transmissions and trade routes, with strong external influences from North India as well as strong local characteristics. By a meticulous analysis of the Quranic manuscripts of the Al Bīrūnī Institute of Oriental Studies, Marie Efthymiou depicts the technical changes of bookmaking, providing new evidence on Samarcand paper and revealing Kokand as a major centre of production. An innovative approach of the manuscripts' uses traces their place in society and in the everyday life of worshippers.