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Shariʿa Councils and Muslim Women in Britain

Rethinking the Role of Power and Authority

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Tanya Walker

The public debate on Shariʿa councils in Britain has been heavily influenced by the assumption that the councils exist as religious authorities and that those who use them exercise their right to religious freedom. In Shariʿa Councils and Muslim Women in Britain Tanya Walker draws on extensive fieldwork from over 100 cases to argue for a radically different understanding of the setting and dynamics of the Shariʿa councils. The analysis highlights the pragmatic manoeuvrings of Muslim women, in pursuit of defined objectives, within limited space – holding in tension both the constraints of particular frameworks of power, and the realities of women’s agency. Despite this needed nuance in a polarised debate however, important questions about the rights of Muslim women remain.

Re-understanding the Child’s Right to Identity

On Belonging, Responsiveness and Hope

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Ya’ir Ronen

Re-understanding the Child’s Right to Identity - On belonging, Responsiveness and Hope, by Ya'ir Ronen offers an innovative understanding of the right to identity aiming to transform its meaning and thus its protection. Drawing on sources from different disciplines, including law, theology, philosophy, psychology and social work, the author offers a vision of social and legal change in which law is a healing force. In it, policies and practice protect children's sense of belonging recognizing human interdependence. They dignify children's disempowered narratives through their responsiveness, protect children's need to be authentic beings and nourish the hope for change and growth in children at risk and their families

Pro-independence Movements and Immigration

Discourse, Policy and Practice

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Edited by Roberta Medda-Windischer and Patricia Popelier

The volume “Pro-independence Movements and Immigration: Discourse, Policy and Practice”, edited by Roberta Medda-Windischer and Patricia Popelier, explores the ways in which pro-independence movements and the governments of sub-state nations view and interact with new immigrants. It also examines the attitudes of new minorities toward pro-independence movements. Through case studies from the Basque Country, Flanders, Catalonia, Quebec, Scotland and South Tyrol, the authors examine the interrelationship between pro-independence movements and new minorities from a new perspective, oriented towards a more plural and inclusive approach between all individuals and groups (regardless of whether they are old or new minority groups) living in a given territory, and particularly in sub-national territories.

Human Rights, Hegemony, and Utopia in Latin America

Poverty, Forced Migration and Resistance in Mexico and Colombia

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Camilo Pérez Bustillo and Karla Hernández Mares

Human Rights, Hegemony and Utopia in Latin America: Poverty, Forced Migration and Resistance in Mexico and Colombia by Camilo Pérez-Bustillo and Karla Hernández Mares explores the evolving relationship between hegemonic and counter-hegemonic visions of human rights, within the context of cases in contemporary Mexico and Colombia, and their broader implications. The first three chapters provide an introduction to the book´s overall theoretical framework, which will then be applied to a series of more specific issues (migrant rights and the rights of indigenous peoples) and cases (primarily focused on contexts in Mexico and Colombia,), which are intended to be illustrative of broader trends in Latin America and globally.

Malcolm X

From Political Eschatology to Religious Revolutionary

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Edited by Dustin Byrd and Seyed Javad Miri

In the year 2015 we remembered the 50th anniversary of Malcolm X’s assassination in Harlem, New York. Spurred by the commitment to continue the critical work that Malcolm X began, the scholars represented in the book have analysed the enduring significance of Malcolm X’s life, work and religious philosophy. Edited by Dustin J. Byrd and Seyed Javad Miri, Malcolm X: From Political Eschatology to Religious Revolutionary, represents an important investigation into the religious and political philosophy of one of the most important African-American and Muslim thinkers of the 20th century. Thirteen different scholars from six different countries and various academic disciplines have contributed to our understanding of why Malcolm X is still important fifty years after his death.

Contributors are: Syed Farid Alatas, Dustin J. Byrd, Bethany Beyyette, Louis A. DeCaro, Stephen C. Ferguson, William David Hart, John H. McClendon, Seyed Javad Miri, John Andrew Morrow, Emin Poljarevic, Rudolf J. Siebert, Nuri Tinaz and Yolanda Van Tilborgh.

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Hanna H. Wei

In A Dialogical Concept of Minority Rights, Hanna H. Wei demonstrates that a more plausible and realistic concept of minority rights should consist of not only rights against the state but also rights against the group. She formulates and defends three separate but related rights to dialogue, and thoroughly analyses how they may operate not only to maintain a healthy balance between the minorities’ need to be culturally distinct and their need to relate to and belong in the larger society, but also that they address the generalisations and presuppositions on which the debate of multiculturalism has been based, and constitute the first step of a possible solution to many of the theoretical and practical difficulties of minority protection.

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Edited by Savaş Çoban

The recent economic crisis, and the challenges to democracy in an increasingly globalized world, brings into sharp relief the importance of mass communication. This volume explores a range of issues, from the nature of communication, to the role of the media industry, to the way that mass communication has facilitated social movements in many parts of the world. Revisiting the works of Karl Marx and others, the essays bring a new perspective and a renewed interest in critical analyses of communication practices globally. This collection represents the cutting edge of communication research introducing a new generation of scholars to understanding changes in the way we learn about our society.

Contributors are: Arthur Asa Berger, Oliver Boyd-Barrett, Savaş Çoban, John Bellamy Foster, Christian Fuchs, Douglas Kellner, Robert W. McChesney, David Miller, Marisol Sandoval, Nick Stevenson, Gerald Sussman, Mandy Tröger, and Michael Wayne.

Gramsci and Languages

Unification, Diversity, Hegemony

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Alessandro Carlucci

Winner of the prestigious 'Giuseppe Sormani International Prize' for the best monograph on Antonio Gramsci (4th edition, 2012-2017).
Antonio Gramsci (1891-1937) is one of the most translated Italian authors of all time. After the Second World War his thought became increasingly influential, and remained relevant throughout the second half of the century. Today, it is generally agreed that his Marxism has highly original and personal features, as confirmed by the fact that his international influence has continued to grow since the fall of the Berlin Wall and the collapse of the Soviet Union. Gramsci and Languages offers an explanation of this originality and traces the origins of certain specific features of Gramsci’s political thought by looking at his lifelong interest in language, especially in questions of linguistic diversity and unification.

Worlds of Human Rights

The Ambiguities of Rights Claiming in Africa

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Edited by Bill Derman, Anne Hellum and Kristin Sandvik

This book engages with contemporary African human rights struggles including land, property, gender equality and legal identity. Through ethnographic field studies it situates claims-making by groups and individuals that have been subject to injustices and abuses, often due to different forms of displacement, in specific geographical, historical and political contexts. Exploring local communities’ complexities and divided interests it addresses the ambiguities and tensions surrounding the processes whereby human rights have been incorporated into legislation, social and economic programs, legal advocacy, land reform, and humanitarian assistance. It shows how existing relations of inequality, domination and control are affected by the opportunities offered by emerging law and governance structures as a plurality of non-state actors enter what previously was considered the sole regulatory domain of the nation state.

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Edited by John J. Betancur and Cedric Herring

Reinventing Race, Reinventing Racism not only provides fresh theoretical insights into the new forms of race and racism, it also provides evidence of and policy solutions to address these seemingly intractable forms of discrimination and racial disparities. These issues are tackled by some of the nation’s most prominent race and public policy scholars. In addition, the volume has contributions by some of the most innovative up-and-coming voices that are often neglected in such volumes. Reinventing Race, Reinventing Racism is an accessible book written on an important and timely subject that continues to affect the lives of Americans of all shades and ethnicities.