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There is a critical need to prepare diverse teachers with expertise in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) with the skills necessary to work effectively with underrepresented K-12 students. Three major goals of funded STEM programs are to attract and prepare students at all educational levels to pursue coursework in the STEM content areas, to prepare graduates to pursue careers in STEM fields, and to improve teacher education programs in the STEM content areas. Drawing upon these goals as the framework for Recruiting, Preparing, and Retaining STEM Teachers for a Global Generation, the 15 chapters contained herein highlight both the challenges and successes of recruiting, preparing, and sustaining novice teachers in the STEM content areas in high-need schools.

Recruiting, retaining and sustaining highly-qualified teachers with expertise in STEM content areas to work in hard-to-staff schools and geographic areas are necessary to equalize educational opportunities for rural and urban Title 1 students. High teacher turnover rates, in combination with teachers working out-of-field, leave many students without highly-qualified teachers in STEM fields. Most of the chapters in this volume were prepared by scholars who received NSF funding through Noyce and are engaged in addressing research questions related to these endeavours.

Contributors are: Lillie R. Albert, Cynthia Anhalt, Saman A. Aryana, Joy Barnes-Johnson, Lora Bartlett, Brezhnev Batres, Diane Bonilla, Patti Brosnan, Andrea C. Burrows, Alan Buss, Laurie O. Campbell, Phil Cantor, Michelle T. Chamberlin, Scott A. Chamberlin, Marta Civil, Lin Ding, Teresa Dunleavy, Belinda P. Edwards, Jennifer A. Eli, Joshua Ellis, Adrian Epps, Anne Even, Angela Frausto, Samantha Heller, Karen E. Irving, Heather Johnson, Nicole M. Joseph, Richard Kitchen, Karen Kuhel, Marina Lazic, Jacqueline Leonard, Rebecca H. McGraw, Daniel Morales-Doyle, Sultana N. Nahar, Justina Ogodo, Anil K. Pradhan, Carolina Salinas, David Segura, Lynette Gayden Thomas, Alisun Thompson, Maria Varelas, Dorothy Y. White, Desha Williams, and Ryan Ziols.
Editors: Will Letts and Steve Fifield
STEM of Desire: Queer Theories and Science Education locates, creates, and investigates intersections of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) education and queer theorizing. Manifold desires—personal, political, cultural—produce and animate STEM education. Queer theories instigate and explore (im)possibilities for knowing and being through desires normal and strange. The provocative original manuscripts in this collection draw on queer theories and allied perspectives to trace entanglements of STEM education, sex, sexuality, gender, and desire and to advance constructive critique, creative world-making, and (com)passionate advocacy. Not just another call for inclusion, this volume turns to what and how STEM education and diverse, desiring subjects might be(come) in relation to each other and the world.

STEM of Desire is the first book-length project on queering STEM education. Eighteen chapters and two poems by 27 contributors consider STEM education in schools and universities, museums and other informal learning environments, and everyday life. Subject areas include physical and life sciences, engineering, mathematics, nursing and medicine, environmental education, early childhood education, teacher education, and education standards. These queering orientations to theory, research, and practice will interest STEM teacher educators, teachers and professors, undergraduate and graduate students, scholars, policy makers, and academic libraries.

Contributors are: Jesse Bazzul, Charlotte Boulay, Francis S. Broadway, Erin A. Cech, Steve Fifield, blake m. r. flessas, Andrew Gilbert, Helene Götschel, Emily M. Gray, Kristin L. Gunckel, Joe E. Heimlich, Tommye Hutson, Kathryn L. Kirchgasler, Michelle L. Knaier, Sheri Leafgren, Will Letts, Anna MacDermut, Michael J. Reiss, Donna M. Riley, Cecilia Rodéhn, Scott Sander, Nicholas Santavicca, James Sheldon, Amy E. Slaton, Stephen Witzig, Timothy D. Zimmerman, and Adrian Zongrone.
Urban Teachers and Students Working Collaboratively
Transformations in Urban Education: Urban Teachers and Students Working Collaboratively addresses pressing problems in urban education, contextualized in research in New York City and nearby school districts on the Northeast Coast of the United States. The schools and institutions involved in empirical studies range from elementary through college and include public and private schools, alternative schools for dropouts, and museums. Difference is regarded as a resource for learning and equity issues are examined in terms of race, ethnicity, language proficiency, designation as special education, and gender. The contexts for research on teaching and learning involve science, mathematics, uses of technology, literacy, and writing comic books. A dual focus addresses research on teaching and learning, and learning to teach in urban schools.
Collaborative activities addressed explicitly are teachers and students enacting roles of researchers in their own classrooms, cogenerative dialogues as activities to allow teachers and students to learn about one another’s cultures and express their perspectives on their experienced realities and negotiate shared recommendations for changes to enacted curricula. Coteaching is also examined as a means of learning to teach, teaching and learning, and undertaking research.
The scholarship presented in the constituent chapters is diverse, reflecting multi-logicality within sociocultural frameworks that include cultural sociology, cultural historical activity theory, prosody, sense of place, and hermeneutic phenomenology. Methodologies employed in the research include narratology, interpretive, reflexive, and authentic inquiry, and multi-level inquiries of video resources combined with interpretive analyses of social artifacts selected from learning environments.
This edited volume provides insights into research of places in which social life is enacted as if there were no research being undertaken. The research was intended to improve practice. Teachers and learners, as research participants, were primarily concerned with teaching and learning and, as a consequence, as we learned from research participants were made aware of what we learned—the purpose being to improve learning environments. Accordingly, research designs are contingent on what happens and emergent in that what we learned changed what happened and expanded possibilities to research and learn about transformation through heightening participants’ awareness about possibilities for change and developing interventions to improve learning.
This book is about the sensuous, living body without which individual knowing and learning is impossible. It is the interface between the individual and culture. Recent scholarship has moved from investigated knowing and learning as something in the mind or brain to understanding these phenomena in terms of the body (embodiment literature) or culture (social constructivism). These two literatures have expanded the understanding of cognition to include the role of the body in shaping the mind and to recognize the tight relation between mind and culture. However, there are numerous problems arising from ways in which the body and culture are thought in these separate research domains. In this book, the authors present an interdisciplinary, scientific initiative that brings together the concerns for body and for culture to develop a single theory of cognition centered on the living and lived body. This book thereby contributes to bridging the gap that currently exists between theory (knowing that) and praxis (knowing how) that is apparent in the existing science and mathematics education literatures.