Author: Mona Samadi
Mona Samadi examines the sources of gender differences within the Islamic legal tradition and describes how Islamic law entitles individuals to justice according to their status, abilities and potential. In the case of men and women's capabilities, the underlying principle is that they are entitled to the same rights, as long as their capabilities are the same. In the legal construction of women's status, women have been prescribed lacking the same abilities and capabilities as men. As such, their status and rights differ, justifying men to be the maintainers of women.

By presenting the historical development of women's status and how women's legal status is debated in contemporary Muslim societies, Mona Samadi convincingly provides various methods for facilitating change within the Islamic legal theory framework.
Author: Nathalie Rébé
In Artificial Intelligence: Robot Law, Policy and Ethics, Dr. Nathalie Rébé discusses the legal and contemporary issues in relation to creating conscious robots, and argues that AI’s physical and decision-making capacities to act on its own, means having to grant it a juridical personality.

The advancement in new technologies forces us to reconsider the role Artificial Intelligence (AI) will have in our society. Sectors such as education, transportation, jobs, sex, business, the military, medical and security will be particularly affected by the development of AI.

This book provides an analysis of cases and existing regulatory tools, which could be used by lawyers in future trials. Dr. Rébé also offers a new comprehensive framework to regulate Strong AI so that ‘it’ can safely live among humans.

This book is a response to two questions: first, should we ban or prohibit AI; and, secondly, if not, what should be the salient features of a legal or regulatory framework for AI?
The Impact of Article 6 of the European Convention on Human Rights
Author: Cristina Teleki
In Due Process and Fair Trial in EU Competition Law, Cristina Teleki addresses the complex relationship between Articles 101 and 102 of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union and Article 6 of the European Convention on Human Rights.
The book is built around the idea that big business can threaten democracy. Due process and fair trial should be central to the process of addressing bigness through competition law, by safeguarding independent decision-making and judicial review and by preventing competition authorities from growing into administrative behemoths threatening democracy from inside. To show this, the book combines a comprehensive review of the case-law of the European Court of Human Rights with insight from economics, psychology and systems theory.
Author: Ilse Verdiesen
The deployment of Autonomous Weapons gives rise to ongoing debate in society and at the United Nations, in the context of the Convention on Certain Conventional Weapons. Yet there little empirical research has been done on this topic. This volume fills that gap by offering an empirical study based on military personnel and civilians working at the Dutch Ministry of Defence. It yields insight into how Autonomous Weapons are perceived by the military and general public; and which moral values are considered important in relation to their deployment. The research approach used is the Value-Sensitive Design (VSD) method that allows for the consideration of human values throughout the design process of technology. The outcome indicates that military personnel and civilians attribute more agency (the capacity to think and plan) to an Autonomous Weapon than to a Human Operated Drone. In addition, it is clear that common ground exists between military and societal groups in their perception of the values of human dignity and anxiety. These two values arise often in the discourse, and addressing them is essential when considering the ethics of the deployment of Autonomous Weapons. The text of this volume is also offered in parallel French and German translation.
This book examines different approaches by which states characterised by federal or decentralized arrangements reconcile equality and autonomy. In case studies from four continents, leading experts analyse the challenges of ensuring institutional, social and economic equality whilst respecting the competences of regions and the rights of groups.
This book casts new light on the application of the principle of proportionality in international law. Proportionality is claimed to play a central role governing the exercise of public power in international law and has been presented as the ‘ultimate rule of law’. It has also been the subject of fierce criticism: it is argued that it leads to unreflexive and arbitrary application of the law and deprives rights of their role as a ’firewall’ protecting individuals. But the debate on proportionality has tended to focus on the question of ‘how’ proportionality should be carried out. Much less attention has been devoted to the question of ‘who’.
This edited volume bring together scholars from a wide range of areas of international law to consider that question: whose interests are at stake when courts and other legal authorities apply the principle of proportionality? In so doing, this volume casts new light on the role which proportionality can play in international law, in shaping and modulating the power relations between the different entities governed by it.
This book offers a legal analysis of sharing of passenger data from the EU to the US in light of the EU legal framework protecting individuals’ privacy and personal data. It aims to situate this analysis with respect to the ever-growing policies of Global North countries to introduce pre-screening procedures in border control proceedings for the purpose of the fight against terrorism. By tracing the literature on the (in)securitisation and as such depoliticization of border controls through technology-led interventions, it explores the multiplicity of purposes that passenger data sharing entail and considers the question on the limitability of fundamental rights depending on its purpose.
This book argues that a view has taken root in Africa, which equates state-secularism to the aggressive removal of religion from the public sphere or even state ambivalence towards religious affairs. This view arises from a misguided interpretation of the practice of state-secularism particularly in France, Turkey and the US, which understanding is ill-suited for the sub-Sahara Africa’s state-religion because the region boasts of at least three major religious traditions, African religion, Islam and Christianity, and blanket condemnation of public manifestation of religion or ambivalence towards it may offend the natural flourishing of this trinity and more. The contribution holds that most applications of state-secularism in Kenya, Nigeria and Uganda favour the Christian faith, which during its tumultuous experiences in Europe survived the enlightenment, the reformation and like experiences socialised to co-exist with what are now called secular states. Additionally, due to the long history of Christendoms in Europe, Christian principles penetrated the colonial legal systems that were bequeathed to Africa at independence and the sustenance of the colonial legacy means that the Abrahamic faith has an upper hand in the state-religion relations’ contest. The obvious loser is African religion which has suffered major onslaughts since the colonial days.
Author: Jens Iverson
In Jus Post Bellum, Jens Iverson provides the Just War foundations of the concept, reveals the function of jus post bellum, and integrates the law that governs the transition from armed conflict to peace. This volume traces the history of jus post bellum avant la letter, tracing important writings on the transition to peace from Augustine, Aquinas, and Kant to more modern jurists and scholars. It explores definitional aspects of jus post bellum, including current its relationship to sister terms and related fields. It also critically evaluates the current state and possibilities for future development of the law and normative principles that apply to the transition to peace. Peacebuilders, scholars, and diplomats will find this book a crucial resource.
Volume IV: Prosecutor v. Sesay, Kallon and Gbao (The RUF Case) (Set of 3)
The Special Court for Sierra Leone was established through signature of a bilateral treaty between the United Nations and the Government of Sierra Leone in early 2002, making it the third modern ad hoc international criminal tribunal. It has tried various persons, including former Liberian President Charles Ghankay Taylor, for serious violations of international humanitarian law committed during the latter half of the Sierra Leonean armed conflict. It completed its work in December 2013. A new Residual Special Court for Sierra Leone, based in Freetown and with offices in The Hague, has been created to carry out its essential “residual” functions.
This volume, which consists of three books and a CD-ROM and is edited by two legal experts on the Sierra Leone Court, completes the set of edited Law Reports started in 2012. Together, the Law Reports fill the gap of a single and authoritative reference source of the tribunal’s jurisprudence. The law reports are intended for national and international judges, lawyers, academics, students and other researchers as well as transitional justice practitioners in courts, tribunals and truth commissions, and anyone seeking an accurate record of the trials conducted by the Special Court for Sierra Leone.

N.B.: The hardback copy of this title contains a CD-ROM with the decisions that are reproduced in the book and the trial transcripts.
The e-book version does not.