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Series:

Ignacio Adiego

This handbook provides a complete and updated view of our current knowledge about Carian, one of the Indo-European languages spoken in ancient Anatolia. The decipherment of the Carian alphabet has only recently made it possible to analyze Carian inscriptions and to classify the Carian language linguistically.
The book covers all major topics of research on Carian: the direct and indirect sources with an edition of the Carian inscriptions following a new classification system, the history of the decipherment, the Carian alphabet, and the phonological, morphological, lexical, and syntactic features of the language. It includes an annotated Carian glossary.
The volume concludes with a special appendix on Carian coins and legends by Koray Konuk that will be of particular interest to specialists in ancient numismatics.

Catalogue of the Western Asiatic Seals in the British Museum

Stamp Seals III: Impressions of Stamp Seals on Cuneiform Tablets, Clay Bullae, and Jar Handles

Terence Mitchell and Ann Searight

This volume publishes drawings of the impressions of stamp seals preserved on Babylonian and Assyrian cuneiform tablets, and other clay objects in the collections of The British Museum. The majority of these seals bears precise dates, ranging from the 9th to the 2nd centuries B.C.; represens the Neo-Assyrian, Neo-Babylonian, Achaemenian and Hellenistic periods; and are set out in chronological order so that the changes in seal design can be clearly seen. Among the images from the Hellenistic period are representations of zodiacal signs.
The volume also includes details of seal impressions on the handles of pottery jars from Palestine. Full bibliographical references to previous publications of the cuneiform texts are given, and the volume concludes with concordances and indices, including a pictorial index of all the seal images arranged typologically.

Series:

Aicha Rahmouni

This volume comprises an analysis of 112 divine epithets occurring in the alphabetic cuneiform texts from Ras Shamra and Ras Ibn Hani. It is intended to encompass all the epithets of the individual Ugaritic deities, semi-divine, and demonic beings, both good and evil, attested in the published texts. The epithets are profound expressions of the religious views of the ancient Ugaritians and their comprehension is essential for understanding the role, character, and status of the various deities in the Ugaritic pantheon. Particular attention has been paid to parallel divine epithets in Akkadian, biblical Hebrew, and classical Arabic.

Series:

Gábor Takács

This is the third and final volume of the Etymological Dictionary of Egyptian. It comprises the Egyptian words with initial m-. The amount of material offered, the extensive treatment of scholarly discussions on each item, and the insights into the connections of Egyptian and the related Afro-Asiatic (Semito-Hamitic) languages, including many new lexical parallels, will make it an indispensable tool for comparative purposes and an unchallenged starting point for every linguist in the field.
The reader will find the etymological entries even more detailed than those of the introductory volume, due to the full retrospective presentation of all etymologies proposed since A. Erman's time, and thanks to an extremely detailed discussion of all possible relevant data even on the less known Afro-Asiatic cognates to the Egyptian roots.

The Manasseh Hill Country Survey, Volume 2

The Eastern Valleys and the Fringes of the Desert

Series:

Adam Zertal

The book presents the results of a complete and detailed archaeological survey in the area of ancient Shechem and Samaria. This survey is being conducted since 1978, and it relates to some 400 square kilometers of the heartland of the central hill country of Israel/Palestine. It is a detailed and thorough archaeological and historical work, which deals with the most important area for biblical and other researches. This territory and its survey is a most valuable tool for every scholar involved in Bible, theology, Ancient Near Eastern history, and other schools concerned.

Series:

Geoffrey Khan

The Aramaic language has continued to be spoken in various dialects down to modern times. Many of these dialects, however, are now endangered due to political events in the Middle East over the last hundred years. This work, in three volumes, presents a description of one such endangered neo-Aramaic dialect, that of the Assyrian Christian community of the Barwar region in northern Iraq. It is a unique record of the dialect based on interviews with the surviving older generation of the community. Volume one contains a detailed grammatical description of the dialect, including sections on phonology, morphology and syntax. Volume two contains an extensive glossary of the lexicon of the dialect with illustrations of various aspects of the material culture. Volume three contains transcriptions of numerous recorded texts, including folktales, ethnographic texts, songs, and proverbs.

Ancient Mosaic Pavements

Themes, Issues, and Trends

Rachel Hachlili

This publication is engaged in issues, trends, and themes depicted on mosaic pavements discovered in Israel, the Gaza Strip and Petra (the provinces of ancient Palaestina Prima, Secunda and Tertia) with comparable floors in Jordan (Arabia). The majority of the mosaic pavements discussed in this study are dated to the 4th-8th centuries CE. Mosaic pavements were the normal medium for decorating the floors of synagogues, churches, monasteries, and chapels, as well as public and private buildings. Inscriptions found on many of the pavements commemorate the donors, refer to the artists, and sometimes date the mosaics. The ornamentation of the mosaics in this region is remarkable, rich, and varied in its themes and provides many insights into the contemporary artistic and social cultures.

Philo of Alexandria: On Virtues

Introduction, Translation, and Commentary

Series:

Walter Wilson

In the treatise On Virtues (part of his so-called Exposition of the Law), Philo of Alexandria demonstrates how Moses, his laws, and the nation constituted by these laws each embody certain widely-discussed moral values, specifically, courage (andreia), humanity (philanthropia), repentance (metanoia), and nobility (eugeneia). Although it makes extensive use of material drawn from the Pentateuch, what the treatise provides is far more than a commentary on scripture. Rather, it contributes to a sophisticated apologetic reconstruction of Jewish origins, idealized according to the principles of both Greek philosophy and Roman political culture. Guided by such principles, Philo endeavors to establish the moral, legal, and social status of Judaism within the Greco-Roman world.

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Edited by Juan Carlos Moreno García

Ancient Egyptian Administration provides the first comprehensive overview of the structure, organization and evolution of the pharaonic administration from its origins to the end of the Late Period. The book not only focuses on bureaucracy, departments, and official practices but also on more informal issues like patronage, the limits in the actual exercise of authority, and the competing interests between institutions and factions within the ruling elite. Furthermore, general chapters devoted to the best-documented periods in Egyptian history are supplemented by more detailed ones dealing with specific archives, regions, and administrative problems. The volume thus produced by an international team of leading scholars will be an indispensable, up-to-date, tool of research covering a much-neglected aspect of pharaonic civilization.

Psalm 18 in Words and Pictures

A Reading Through Metaphor

Series:

Alison Ruth Gray

In Psalm 18 in Words and Pictures: A Reading Through Metaphor, Alison Gray engages in an in-depth study of the figurative language of Psalm 18, demonstrating the necessity of a dynamic approach to metaphor interpretation within a given textual unit. As one of the longest and most elaborate in the Hebrew Bible, Psalm 18 provides fertile soil for studying the interplay between words and images. While previous studies of the Psalm have focused on questions of form, structure, or unity - as well the relation to its Doppeltext of 2 Samuel 22 - Alison Gray explores the ways in which a metaphor-oriented hermeneutic enriches the psalm’s translation and exegesis.