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In The Athenian Ephebeia and Citizen Training from Lykourgos to Augustus Thomas R. Henderson provides a new history of the Athenian ephebeia, a system of military, athletic, and moral instruction for new Athenian citizens. Characterized as a system of hoplite training with roots in ancient initiation rituals, the institution appears here as a later Lykourgan creation with the aim of reinvigorating Athenian civic culture. This book also presents a re-evaluation of the Hellenistic phase of the ephebeia, which has been commonly regarded as an institution in decline. Utilizing new epigraphic material, the author demonstrates that, in addition to rigorous military training, the ephebeia remained an important institution and played a vital and vibrant part of Athenian civic life.
Rights, Citizenship and Civil Discord
In the first century CE, Philo of Alexandria and Josephus offer vivid descriptions of conflicts between Judeans and Greeks in Greek cities of the Roman Empire over various issues, including the Judeans’ civic identity, the extent of their obligations to local cities and cults, and the potential security threat they posed to those cities. This study analyzes the narratives of these conflicts, investigating what citizenship status Judeans enjoyed, their political influence and whether they enjoyed the right to establish institutions for observing their ancestral worship. For these narratives to be understood properly, it should be assumed that many Judeans were already citizens of their cities, and that this status played a central role in those conflicts.
This work gives a detailed survey of the rise and expansion of Christianity in ancient Lycaonia and adjacent areas, from Paul the apostle until the late 4th-century bishop of Iconium, Amphilochius. It is essentially based on hundreds of funerary inscriptions from Lycaonia, but takes into account all available literary evidence. It maps the expansion of Christianity in the region and describes the practice of name-giving among Christians, their household and family structures, occupations, and use of verse inscriptions. It gives special attention to forms of charity, the reception of biblical tradition, the authority and leadership of the clergy, popular theology and forms of ascetic Christianity in Lycaonia.
In The Origin and Meaning of Ekklēsia in the Early Jesus Movement, Ralph J. Korner explores the ideological implications of Christ-follower associations self-designating collectively as ekklēsiai. Politically, Korner’s inscriptional research suggests that an association named ekklēsia would have been perceived as a positive, rather than as a counter-imperial, participant within Imperial Greek cities. Socio-religiously, Korner argues that there was no universal ekklēsia to which all first generation Christ-followers belonged; ekklēsia was a permanent group designation used by Paul’s associations. Ethno-religiously, Korner contends that ekklēsia usage by intra muros groups within pluriform Second Temple Judaism problematizes suggestions, not least at the institutional level, that Paul was “parting ways” with Judaism(s), ‘Jewishness’, or Jewish organizational forms.
This book explores how early Christian communities constructed, developed, and asserted their identity and authority in various socio-cultural contexts in Asia Minor and Greece in the first five centuries CE. With the help of the database Inscriptiones Christianae Graecae ( ICG), special attention is given to ancient inscriptions which represent a rich and valuable source of information on the early Christians’ social and religious identity, family networks, authority structures, and place and function in society. This collection of essays by various specialists of Early Christianity, Epigraphy, and Late Antiquity, offers a broad geographical survey of the expansion and socio-cultural development of Christianity/ies in Asia Minor and Greece, and sheds new light on the religious transformation of the Later Roman Empire.
In Private Associations and Jewish Communities in the Hellenistic and Roman Cities, Benedikt Eckhardt brings together a group of experts to investigate a problem of historical categorization. Traditionally, scholars have either presupposed that Jewish groups were “Greco-Roman Associations” like others or have treated them in isolation from other groups. Attempts to begin a cross-disciplinary dialogue about the presuppositions and ultimate aims of the respective approaches have shown that much preliminary work on categories is necessary. This book explores the methodological dividing lines, based on the common-sense assumption that different questions require different solutions. Re-introducing historical differentiation into a field that has been dominated by abstractions, it provides the debate with a new foundation. Case studies highlight the problems and advantages of different approaches.
Further Studies on Boiotian Inscriptions
In Epigraphica Boeotica II John Fossey continues to treat results of his nearly 50 years of research into the archaeology and inscriptions of Ancient Boiotia ( Epigraphica Boeotica I, Amsterdam, 1991). The first part of the volume discusses the relations between Boiotia and other parts of the Greek world as seen in acts of proxenia and agonistic victor lists. After a section on dedications both religious and civic, there follows a series of studies of ancient tombstones, many of them spolia used in more recent buildings, with prosopographic and onomastic commentary on the names contained in them. Discussion throughout features letter forms and one specific example of this is an epigramme by the Roman philhellene emperor Hadrianus. An unusual rupestral text concludes the volume.
New Research Perspectives
This book involves a new historiographical study of the Hellenica Oxyrhynchia that defines its relationship with fifth- and fourth-century historical works as well as its role as a source of Diodorus’ Bibliotheke. The traditional and common approach taken by those who studied the HO is primarily historical: scholars have focused on particular, often isolated, topics such as the question of the authorship, the historical perspective of the HO against other Hellenica from the 4th century BC. This book is unconventional in that it offers a study of the HO and fifth- and fourth-century historical works supported by papyrological enquiries and literary strategies, such as intertextuality and narratology, which will undoubtedly contribute to the progress of research in ancient historiography.
When one thinks of inscriptions produced under the Roman Empire, public inscribed monuments are likely to come to mind. Hundreds of thousands of such inscriptions are known from across the breadth of the Roman Empire, preserved because they were created of durable material or were reused in subsequent building. This volume looks at another aspect of epigraphic creation – from handwritten messages scratched on wall-plaster to domestic sculptures labeled with texts to displays of official patronage posted in homes: a range of inscriptions appear within the private sphere in the Greco-Roman world. Rarely scrutinized as a discrete epigraphic phenomenon, the incised texts studied in this volume reveal that writing in private spaces was very much a part of the epigraphic culture of the Roman Empire.
La Phrygie Parorée et la Pisidie septentrionale deals with the history, the historical geography and the cultural sociology of Phrygia Paroreios and Northern Pisidia during the Hellenistic and Roman periods (IVth cent. BC – IVth cent. AD). This region of inner Anatolia, mostly inhabited by Pisidians and Phrygians, faced gradually the settlement of Greek, Macedonian, Jewish, Thracian, Lycian and Roman colonists who deeply modified the local cultures and geopolitics. With an approach based on epigraphic, archaeological, literary and numismatic sources, this work is the first historical synthesis devoted to a region showing strong cultural identities, which makes it essential to the understanding of the Graeco-Roman East.

La Phrygie Parorée et la Pisidie septentrionale traite de l’Histoire, de la géographie historique et de la sociologie culturelle de la Phrygie Parorée et du Nord de la Pisidie aux époques hellénistique et romaine (IVe s. av. J.-C.-IVe s. ap. J.-C.). Cette région de l’Anatolie intérieure, surtout peuplée par les Pisidiens et les Phrygiens, eut successivement à faire face à l’installation de colons grecs, macédoniens, juifs, thraces, lyciens et romains qui modifièrent en profondeur les cultures et la géopolitique locales. Grâce à une approche fondée sur l’examen des sources épigraphiques, archéologiques, littéraires et numismatiques, cet ouvrage constitue la première synthèse historique sur une région aux identités culturelles marquées, essentielle à la compréhension de l’Orient gréco-romain.